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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Nature & Landscapes 
Thread started 12 May 2014 (Monday) 13:11
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Help with lightning

 
xarik
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May 12, 2014 13:11 |  #1

I think this is the right thread, I would like to shoot lightning. Do you guys just set your cameras up by a window and underexpose and do a long exposure with ND filters? How do you shoot lightening? Where do you put your camera? I Have a 5D and a t3i so clearly I can't be sitting in rain shooting :P. I would absolutely love to be able to shoot lightening over lake Michigan, but I would need a tarp to put over my camera and me and that would hardly work. Let me know your process and any suggestions :)


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h14nha
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Jun 02, 2014 15:08 |  #2

http://www.ebay.co.uk …ss_RL&hash=item​27c10f2601 (external link)

Have a look at this, hope it helps............


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gonzogolf
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Jun 02, 2014 15:15 |  #3

A lightning trigger is a handy tool. If you have a fairly active cell you can do as you mention and just take time exposures and capture the bolt or multiple bolts as they appear.




  
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Shawnc
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Jun 02, 2014 15:53 |  #4

You don't have to be "In the Storm" to capture lightning. All the lightning I have captured has been from a distance at night with a medium to long lens. So rain is not the gravest concern. I set my shutter for a 30 sec exposure and let the camera capture what ever happens. You can get a pretty good idea where the strikes have been hitting and aim your shot there and pray for more. I've inly had one close call, but one is enough...


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MalVeauX
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Jun 02, 2014 19:01 |  #5

xarik wrote in post #16899340 (external link)
I think this is the right thread, I would like to shoot lightning. Do you guys just set your cameras up by a window and underexpose and do a long exposure with ND filters? How do you shoot lightening? Where do you put your camera? I Have a 5D and a t3i so clearly I can't be sitting in rain shooting :P. I would absolutely love to be able to shoot lightening over lake Michigan, but I would need a tarp to put over my camera and me and that would hardly work. Let me know your process and any suggestions :)

Heya,

I capture lightning where/when I can. I do 10 second exposures where possible, and just hope to get lucky (no triggers for me). Last time I did it, I set my camera to F8 in relatively dark skies (sun just went down, been dark about an hour), 10 seconds, ISO 400. Exposed and just did a few. Captured some neat lightning. Also did it outside with less time, like 3 second exposures. I just did a few (continuous) until I captured some lightning. I found I was using telephoto ranges for a lot of it, as the storms I was capturing were rather far away. When it's right over my head, the lightning is awesome, but the hail and rain is not so awesome to stand in.

Very best,


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xarik
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Jun 02, 2014 21:26 |  #6

Thanks for the responses everyone! :)

I posted this in another spot and got a similar answer and I haven't had the chance to try this out yet.

I'm wondering if I shoot a 5D with a 28-70mm F2.8 L, would it be bad to shoot it near the 28 or 35mm mark to get a rather wide shot. I don't want an image of just the bolt, I want the scenery and then I want the lightening in the background, but I don't want it to be too small :).

When shooting at a 10 or 30 second exposure, do you under expose in hopes to get the lightening to expose the frame properly?


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Photo123abc
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Jun 03, 2014 06:35 as a reply to  @ xarik's post |  #7

You should go for 24mm, I use 14mm and its not too wide for lightning because you never know where its gonna strike. You can always crop it a bit. ;)
I usualy take 2-5 second exposures.


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gonzogolf
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Jun 03, 2014 09:54 |  #8

Use the focal length that lets you frame the shot as you want it to look. Obviously wider gets you more sky and that may improve your odds, but what good is catching a strike in a shot where you dont like the composition?




  
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Help with lightning
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