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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 09 Jun 2014 (Monday) 20:39
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AF questions

 
mamaof2
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Jun 09, 2014 20:39 |  #1

I have a question on AF (FIY I own a T4i and very new to all this)

1. Do you recompose when you are taking pics or do you select your focal point each time (mine has a wheel where I can tell it where to focus on)? Explain why please.


Jessi
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PhotosGuy
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Jun 09, 2014 22:09 |  #2

When you're shooting what?
I prefer to pick a focus point. If you're shooting at a small # f-stop, recomposing can be a problem.
Focus-Recompose, or...?


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Tedder
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Jun 10, 2014 00:00 |  #3

I do sometimes one, sometimes the other. Under certain circumstances (especially when you're dealing with narrow depth of field) the focus-and-recompose method can cause you to miss focus.


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tonylong
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Jun 10, 2014 00:57 |  #4

I'd say it depends. I've done my share of focus/re-composing, as long as the aperture is narrow enough to not skewer things, but I do prefer to pick the focal point closest to my subject, and then there is only a minor amount of re-composing to get the framing right.

However, in lower light, especially with the older cameras I shoot with, using the "outer" focus points can be, well, not-so-good, and there I pretty much stick to the center focus point.

Sometimes, though, relying on the Center Point AF can throw the composition off, requiring a lot of cropping. Not my preference, because that would tend to lead to sticking with small prints.


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mamaof2
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Jun 10, 2014 11:21 |  #5

If I am focusing and recomposing... My question is..some times im pointing at something I want in focus say the persons eyes ..but the outside lights light up showing those are the point of focus not the middle focal point...so how do I make that work?
Hope this makes sense..

Is there a setting I should set my camera at? I did a factory reset so right now my camera is set like you would get it out of the box other then I selected AF one shot.

last question...when I was taking pics the other day a ton of my shots were way over exposed..thoughts on this? (i can post pic if you need to see)


Jessi
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gonzogolf
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Jun 10, 2014 11:27 |  #6

Generally I only focus and recompose when the spread of the focus points wont cover what I want to focus on.




  
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morph2_7
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Jun 10, 2014 12:15 |  #7

gonzogolf wrote in post #16963218 (external link)
Generally I only focus and recompose when the spread of the focus points wont cover what I want to focus on.

This brings up a new question, I wonder why camera companies cluster the AF points right in the center of the frame? It doesn't matter if there are 50 or more AF points if they cover the same area (more or less) as 9 AF points. Why not spread them closer to the edge of the frame?




  
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tonylong
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Jun 10, 2014 14:54 |  #8

mamaof2 wrote in post #16963209 (external link)
If I am focusing and recomposing... My question is..some times im pointing at something I want in focus say the persons eyes ..but the outside lights light up showing those are the point of focus not the middle focal point...so how do I make that work?
Hope this makes sense..

Is there a setting I should set my camera at? I did a factory reset so right now my camera is set like you would get it out of the box other then I selected AF one shot.

Check your camera manual for "AF Points". You can set the camera to use "All AF Points", which is what happens when you shoot in the Auto/Green Box modes. But frequently, that doesn't work well, so many of us shoot using a selected focus point. The Center AF point tends to be the most accurate/reliable, but feel free to choose an outer point when it suits the composition and the light allows you to get the AF!

last question...when I was taking pics the other day a ton of my shots were way over exposed..thoughts on this? (i can post pic if you need to see)

Well, we are all learning to take photos! Learning to get a good exposure is a key to that! Of course, if you shoot in the Auto/Green Box modes (or one of the semi-auto modes) then the camera will do its best to get a "good" exposure, and if the light is right, then our cameras can do a pretty decent job! This is why you see some phone/point & shoot photos that look pretty good!

But when you get "serious" about your photography, you want to take more control of what your camera is doing. The challenge is to do that without ruining your photos, but rather to improve them!

Here's a fun quick read:

https://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=414088


Tony
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mamaof2
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Jun 10, 2014 15:14 |  #9

tonylong wrote in post #16963625 (external link)
Check your camera manual for "AF Points". You can set the camera to use "All AF Points", which is what happens when you shoot in the Auto/Green Box modes. But frequently, that doesn't work well, so many of us shoot using a selected focus point. The Center AF point tends to be the most accurate/reliable, but feel free to choose an outer point when it suits the composition and the light allows you to get the AF!

Well, we are all learning to take photos! Learning to get a good exposure is a key to that! Of course, if you shoot in the Auto/Green Box modes (or one of the semi-auto modes) then the camera will do its best to get a "good" exposure, and if the light is right, then our cameras can do a pretty decent job! This is why you see some phone/point & shoot photos that look pretty good!

But when you get "serious" about your photography, you want to take more control of what your camera is doing. The challenge is to do that without ruining your photos, but rather to improve them!

Here's a fun quick read:

https://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=414088

Thanks for the link Ill check it out. Right now I shoot in AV


Jessi
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tonylong
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Jun 10, 2014 15:58 |  #10

mamaof2 wrote in post #16963667 (external link)
Thanks for the link Ill check it out. Right now I shoot in AV

Av lets you set a "fixed" aperture, but it doesn't control your exposure. It automatically follows the camera's metering.

So, when shooting in any of the "Creative" modes (Av, Tv, P or M) you should learn how to "see" the light of a scene, to learn from experience 1) what metering mode might be most useful and 2) how to adjust your exposure to adapt to the lighting of your scene as well as the metering of the camera. For P, Av and Tv modes you can use the camera Exposure Compensation control to either "boost" your exposure or lower it...look in your camera manual to get the specifics of how to do that.


Tony
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Tony Long Photos on PBase (external link)
Wildlife project pics here (external link), Biking Photog shoots here (external link), "Suburbia" project here (external link)! Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood pics here (external link)

  
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kfreels
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Jun 11, 2014 03:53 |  #11

morph2_7 wrote in post #16963320 (external link)
This brings up a new question, I wonder why camera companies cluster the AF points right in the center of the frame? It doesn't matter if there are 50 or more AF points if they cover the same area (more or less) as 9 AF points. Why not spread them closer to the edge of the frame?

As you get closer to the edge of the frame you get more distortion from the lenses which can really screw up you focus accuracy.


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PH68
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Jun 11, 2014 04:23 |  #12

For a fast (low number) f-stop I always choose the focus point and don't recompose as the depth of field can be very narrow. So focus needs to be accurate.

For slower f-stops, such as f/8 or f/16, I might recompose if I'm in a rush... as the depth of field is large enough that the point of focus might be making little difference.

Generally though I always choose a single most appropriate focus point.


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morph2_7
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Jun 11, 2014 10:40 |  #13

kfreels wrote in post #16964703 (external link)
As you get closer to the edge of the frame you get more distortion from the lenses which can really screw up you focus accuracy.

Thanks.




  
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