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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Weddings & Other Family Events Talk 
Thread started 17 Jun 2014 (Tuesday) 22:39
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Pre and Post Wedding Candid Shooting

 
rakesh
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Jun 17, 2014 22:39 |  #1

Hi

I've my first assignment of Pre and Post Wedding Candid Shooting for an India Client.

Also this is my first professional assignment aand before this I've worked on several small assignments but still not sure about following as Candid Photography is a special branch of photography.

Before I post my questions, I would like to specify the equipments I'm going to use :

5D Mark 3 Bodies : 2 Nos.
EF 70-200/2.8 IS2 Lens
EF 24-105/F4 Lens
EF 24-70/F2.8 Lens
EF 50/1.8 Lens

580/EX2 Flash
Custom made Diffuser for Flash (if needed)

Hence I need some help from all the experts :

1. What Metering works best - Spot, Center Weighted or Evaluative ?
2. Whether Zone Mode of Focussing is better or Single Point Focus Mode
3. Should I use Exposure Compensation to - side or + side

Also as most of the pre and post wedding shots will be outdoor hence answer on above is required and will help me definitely in achieving the desired goals.


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tim
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Jun 17, 2014 23:38 |  #2

Please don't take this the wrong way, but you really need to read a book on the basics of digital photographer to explain metering, focusing, and exposure. You have great equipment but that won't help if you don't understand the principles behind how to use it, and you need to build up experience. Don't forget to learn about histograms (google them) and the difference between EC and flash exposure compensation. EC and FEC work independently on Canon cameras, and you have to know how to balance flash with ambient light, both intensity, direction, and color.

To answer your questions though:
1) Single centre point
2) Single
3) Dark subjects usually require negative EC, light require positive EC. Mixed will need a little bit positive usually.


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rakesh
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Jun 18, 2014 01:24 |  #3

Tim

Thanks. Actually I'm am Nature Photographer and for the first time I'm doing Wedding Photography and i.e why I asked these questions.

Earlier for the same couple, I did some trial shots and most of them came out well but still I'm not happy with my results. May be I need to change my technique or some settings to get the best results.

Can you guide me to some link where I can find more info on this.


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memoriesoftomorrow
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Jun 18, 2014 01:30 |  #4

What is the process you go through at the moment when you take photographs of people? What mode are you using? Do you understand the principles of the exposure triangle? How to focus and how to expose are the basics to any type of photography. What is it about photographing people that you are finidng different from when you photograph an animal?


Peter

  
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rakesh
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Jun 18, 2014 01:47 |  #5

While shooting Animals, I depends on Evaluative Metering Mode and always shoot in Aperture Priority.

Recently when I did trial shoot, I used Spot Metering and Evaluative Metering both and with multiple focusing points.

Whjile shooting People, we have to be more accurate in getting the skin tones, ambience and lighting.

For trial shoot, I didn't used Tripod but fr final pre and post wedding shoots, I'm going to use tripod at maximum with Wimberley head.


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tim
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Jun 18, 2014 03:24 |  #6

Don't use spot metering, use partial or eval. Weddings have extremes in terms of exposure, black and white. I expose for the face and if there's a white dress it falls where it falls.

Tripods don't work for portrait photography generally, they're too restrictive, they're slow, and they put a barrier between you and the subject. Maybe for family formals at a wedding, nothing else. If your shutter speed's so low you need a tripod you're doing it wrong. In 100+ weddings I've only ever used at tripod about ten times, for family formals when it suited me.

You really need to go out with a portrait or wedding photographer to learn this stuff. The technical stuff is going to be the least of your problems.


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scorpio_e
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Jun 18, 2014 06:15 |  #7

1. What Metering works best - Evaluative
2. Single Point Focus Mode
3. Should I use Exposure Compensation to - side or + side. I do not do this.

Good luck getting candids *LOL* As soon as you raise the camera,people tend to pose. I have done quite a few Indian events. Have fun


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memoriesoftomorrow
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Jun 18, 2014 06:23 |  #8

1. I ignore the camera's metering and use turn liveview on and off to set exposures
2. Single point (often on servo)
3. I don't use EC


Peter

  
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mclaren777
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Jun 19, 2014 10:49 |  #9

memoriesoftomorrow wrote in post #16978921 (external link)
1. I ignore the camera's metering and use turn liveview on and off to set exposures

What percentage of shots does LV represent when shooting with your Canon cameras?


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memoriesoftomorrow
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Jun 19, 2014 11:09 |  #10

mclaren777 wrote in post #16981428 (external link)
What percentage of shots does LV represent when shooting with your Canon cameras?

100% of everything but a portion of the reception. It is the ONLY way I shoot for the vast majority of the day. At the reception I also use an AV technique I came up with for part of the time which basically turns a 5D MKIII with on camera flash (bounced) into a giant point and shoot. AV mode, spot metered and exposure locked on skin tones with ETTL and FEL +0.7. I still ignore the needles etc when shooting that way. In fact using back button focus I have a thumb slide I do across two buttons which means I just point and shoot. Makes life so much easier.

As a result of both techniques I use I'd have no issues supplying SOOC images.


Peter

  
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highway0691
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Jun 20, 2014 06:34 |  #11

memoriesoftomorrow wrote in post #16981465 (external link)
100% of everything but a portion of the reception. It is the ONLY way I shoot for the vast majority of the day. At the reception I also use an AV technique I came up with for part of the time which basically turns a 5D MKIII with on camera flash (bounced) into a giant point and shoot. AV mode, spot metered and exposure locked on skin tones with ETTL and FEL +0.7. I still ignore the needles etc when shooting that way. In fact using back button focus I have a thumb slide I do across two buttons which means I just point and shoot. Makes life so much easier.

As a result of both techniques I use I'd have no issues supplying SOOC images.

Just a point on the Live View usage. I also find it very useful in some situations, my big issue with it however is it takes a few seconds before the next shot can be taken. It's a bit slow for me for the most part of the day. Unless you lock in the settings using LV and then go back to shooting through the viewfinder, Still not sure about that either.


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NewCreation
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Jun 24, 2014 05:55 |  #12

memoriesoftomorrow wrote in post #16981465 (external link)
100% of everything but a portion of the reception. It is the ONLY way I shoot for the vast majority of the day. At the reception I also use an AV technique I came up with for part of the time which basically turns a 5D MKIII with on camera flash (bounced) into a giant point and shoot. AV mode, spot metered and exposure locked on skin tones with ETTL and FEL +0.7. I still ignore the needles etc when shooting that way. In fact using back button focus I have a thumb slide I do across two buttons which means I just point and shoot. Makes life so much easier.

As a result of both techniques I use I'd have no issues supplying SOOC images.

Hey Peter,
Just a quick question. The two buttons you're pressing with your thumb are focus and exposure lock, correct? If so, any reason you're not using 1/2 shutter button press to lock? Just trying to understand what you're accomplishing.


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memoriesoftomorrow
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Jun 24, 2014 06:15 |  #13

NewCreation wrote in post #16991093 (external link)
Hey Peter,
Just a quick question. The two buttons you're pressing with your thumb are focus and exposure lock, correct? If so, any reason you're not using 1/2 shutter button press to lock? Just trying to understand what you're accomplishing.

I prefer to back button focus. When I press the shutter I only have to worry about timing the moment at that point. Just how I prefer to shoot.


Peter

  
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NewCreation
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Jun 24, 2014 06:28 |  #14

memoriesoftomorrow wrote in post #16991110 (external link)
I prefer to back button focus. When I press the shutter I only have to worry about timing the moment at that point. Just how I prefer to shoot.

I prefer bbf as well. I was just wondering if you're locking exposure when you speak of a two button thumb slide. Sorry I wasn't clear with my question.


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memoriesoftomorrow
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Jun 24, 2014 06:33 |  #15

NewCreation wrote in post #16991121 (external link)
I prefer bbf as well. I was just wondering if you're locking exposure when you speak of a two button thumb slide. Sorry I wasn't clear with my question.

Because I'm spot metering and locking exposure on skin tones whilst in AV mode. With ETTL at around +0.7 / +1 it means that the exposures come out pretty much bang on (providing you bounce the flash in the right direction). Lock exposure / get focus at the same time leaves just the timing for the shot itself. It also means I can pretty much do all three simulaneously. also using BBG means I can use the DOF preview button easily to switch to servo on the fly.


Peter

  
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Pre and Post Wedding Candid Shooting
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