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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 22 Jul 2014 (Tuesday) 07:00
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Whats your photography skill level ?

 
iamascientist
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Jul 23, 2014 14:23 |  #31

I think there's like 86 levels, level 42 is especially difficult but there's a code to warp straight to level 60, I'm still trying to figure it out.




  
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STIC
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Jul 23, 2014 18:39 as a reply to  @ iamascientist's post |  #32
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Some great comments here...

I guess it's all relative, really...

I got into photography simply because I liked to see drag racing images, so took my own with instant cameras. I splashed out many moons ago now, when I was feeling flush and brought my first SLR (a Pentax P30T). I shot a lot of film, and most of it was not that good, but I developed a love of automotive photography and this led to me become a part time motorsport/automotive photographer, and from this, I also developed a writing career...

I moved into Digital in a similar fashion, starting with a Sony cyber shot (can you believe 2.1MP was impressive once?) and progressing up to the current 7D (hope to have a 5Diii shortly) and it's led me to work as an automotive journalist in several fields, a performance mag editor, a writer/photographer for a local paper and also got me into graphic design and document layout...

Despite all this, my camera is almost always on aperture priority and despite owning a 580EXII for years, I have no real idea about flash, or lighting for that matter...

I have no formal training so I often don't even know what other photographers are talking about when describing settings or such.

I am light years ahead of where I started out in some areas, and not even at beginner level in others; so, i'm a beginner who's had a somewhat career (which makes me a professional as I was paid to do it) who is still learning the ropes in many aspects of photography...

I don't think this helped answer the questions, did it?

:rolleyes:


7D MarkII l 50 1.8 STM l15-85 IS USM l 100-400 IS L l 2x converter l 580EX II l Wireless remote l A computer l Some software l A vehicle to get me around...;)

  
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jcolman
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Jul 23, 2014 19:07 |  #33

I've been making my living creating images in either video, film or digital photography for over 40 years. I guess that makes me a professional. However sometimes I still feel like an amateur when I can't quite create the image I see in my mind that I want to produce.

So even us "old time pros" still struggle with photography from time to time.


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Clean ­ Gene
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Jul 24, 2014 01:21 |  #34

DC Fan wrote in post #17048177 (external link)
Photographers can never expect to control a situation

I don't agree with that. Granted, it largely depends on what kind of work one tends to do, but people who do more contrived kinds of photographs are largely gonna have a greater degree of control in some aspects. If you're dealing with natural light, you can't control the sun. If you're deliberately setting up artificial lighting, then you should absolutely be expected to control the lighting.




  
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Clean ­ Gene
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Jul 24, 2014 01:29 |  #35

yogestee wrote in post #17048515 (external link)
I've had this discussion with a friend who does some amazing work especially social documentary photography throughout Asia. He has won many awards in Europe, USA and Australia. In fact I'd put him up against Steve McCurry anytime. His work is so good.

He is a very humble kinda guy. His philosophy is he only shows his best. He culls heavily and never lets anyone see his bloopers, and by his own admission has many. He just happens to be in the right place at the right time.

http://paulwager.photo​shelter.com/#!/portfol​io/G0000QnY9DbY14O8 (external link)

Check him out.

In my experience, no one just consistently "happens" to be at the right place at the right time. I see that as being lucky, and people tend to not be consistently lucky unless they're putting in a buttload of hard work. It's easy to be lucky once or twice, but I guarantee that the people who are consistently lucky are making the odds work in their favor.




  
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KCY
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Jul 24, 2014 09:03 |  #36

there is a mathematical function that you can tell you how good you are unfortunately it is not a linear function, here is the plot of it though :lol:
http://www.photography​blogger.net …es-of-a-photographer.jpeg (external link)


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airfrogusmc
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Jul 24, 2014 09:35 |  #37

Clean Gene wrote in post #17052383 (external link)
In my experience, no one just consistently "happens" to be at the right place at the right time. I see that as being lucky, and people tend to not be consistently lucky unless they're putting in a buttload of hard work. It's easy to be lucky once or twice, but I guarantee that the people who are consistently lucky are making the odds work in their favor.

Bresson called it a developed instinct and it seems the well prepared get lucky consistently.

Some great words by Meyerowitz in this movie trailer (great movie BTW) and sums up why when I'm not working professionally I love this type of work that is about making some kind of visual sense out of chaos.
It says poster removed but just push play. It plays....
http://www.traileraddi​ct.com/everybody-street/trailer (external link)




  
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Van ­ Gogh
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Jul 24, 2014 12:22 |  #38

KCY wrote in post #17052851 (external link)
there is a mathematical function that you can tell you how good you are unfortunately it is not a linear function, here is the plot of it though :lol:
http://www.photography​blogger.net …es-of-a-photographer.jpeg (external link)

Haha I have to say that graph is actually quiet accurate. :D


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memoriesoftomorrow
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Jul 24, 2014 13:27 |  #39

What's your photography skill level?

Good enough that people will buy what I sell I guess... or perhaps... able to consistently deliver what people hire me to deliver.


Peter

  
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Phoenixkh
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Jul 24, 2014 13:44 |  #40

I decided to get serious about photography fairly recently. I had a plan and been slowly working on it since I bought my first decent digital camera in 2010, i.e., the G12. I learned a lot with that little camera, thanks to it and also to the crew here at POTN. In addition, I bought and read quite a few books. Reading has always been a hobby of mine and the books I purchased have been instructive.

I'm now shooting a DLSR and it really depends on the day whether I feel content with my journey or not. I have some photographs of which I am very fond, but there are times when I cannot get the camera to match what I see in my head.

Overall, I'm quite pleased I took up photography.

Edit: I just realized I didn't give myself a skill level. ;) Not good enough to feel I've arrived but certainly better than when I started out.


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RRS tripod and monopod | 580EXII | Cinch 1 & Loop 3 Special Edition | Editing Encouraged

  
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frankchn
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Jul 25, 2014 00:13 |  #41

Very bad, compared to what my gear can do.




  
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Brain ­ Mechanic
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Jul 25, 2014 00:20 |  #42
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Skill level I am???? Who knows! I just like what I do and thats all there is to it! Some may like it too others not....thats life righ there.


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Clean ­ Gene
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Jul 25, 2014 03:29 |  #43

airfrogusmc wrote in post #17052907 (external link)
Bresson called it a developed instinct and it seems the well prepared get lucky consistently.

Some great words by Meyerowitz in this movie trailer (great movie BTW) and sums up why when I'm not working professionally I love this type of work that is about making some kind of visual sense out of chaos.
It says poster removed but just push play. It plays....
http://www.traileraddi​ct.com/everybody-street/trailer (external link)


Yeah, that's sort of what I meant. It SEEMS that the well-prepared get lucky consistently, but perceptions can be deceiving. It's not luck at all. Brilliant and spectacular and fascinating potential images happen all the time, that stuff is not rare in the least. It's just that it first requires learning to see it in the first place and then learning to capture it. And from what I can tell, THAT is the hard part. The people who are "well-prepared" and who do the work and have "developed" their instincts, totally seem to keep getting lucky, but it's not luck at all. It's an absolute assload of hard freaking work.

Anyway, there's one particular comment in there that struck my attention. He says something like, "there's studio photography and street photography. Some people want to pretend that life is like a movie, while street photographers say, 'show me.'"

At first that comment struck me as elitist as hell. As if it was dismissing studio (or contrived) photography as somehow being lesser. And it was also a little bit personally stinging, since nearly all of what I shoot is contrived or manipulated to some degree (either I'm posing a subject or constructing a scene or manipulating the light). But then I stopped and thought about it for a minute and was like, "wow, in a way he's totally freaking right."

Someone very recently asked me why I shoot what I shoot and why I shoot like I shoot. I didn't know. I'm not there yet. I'm still at the level where I know I can make cool images and I'm starting to develop a style, but I'm still a long way from piecing it all together and knowing what all of it is about and what it all means. The guy mentioned that I rarely shoot people, I almost totally focus on organics, and I have zero interest on whether what I'm shooting is pretty or grotesque. Like, why do I do that instead of photographing buildings or forks?

And I didn't really know, but I gave an educated guess. I think that I shoot what I shoot because I gravitate to disorder and chaos. I focus on the organic rather than the synthetic because organic things are more often chaotic and disordered and I am fascinated by getting structure out of disorder and chaos and am fascinated by making something ugly look good.

And like...Meyerowitz is right. Do you know who I have the utmost respect for? Street photographers. Do you know what I rarely ever do? Street photography. I think it might be because we're both kind of doing the same thing. We're trying to get order out of chaos. Some make the order, some find the order, but both are gravitating towards chaos and disorder and trying to make sense out of it. It's just that street photographers need to have a developed enough eye to see that when it happens. Whereas someone like me is more like, "crap, I can't see that. Screw it, I'll just make something." We're both sort of doing the same thing. But I sort of have to fabricate things because I'm not that good at seeing what's already there. Other people don't have to fabricate things, because their visual eye and developed instinct gives them so much stuff to shoot that they don't have to resort to fabricating it.

But it all kind of ties together, I think. The head of the photo department at my school freaking loves my images. I'd wager to say that out of all of the students he considers me one of his favorites (in terms of images, I suck as an actual student) because he's called me out on that publicly in front of my peers (which I have a problem with, but that's another matter). What does he shoot? Largely street photography. His photography is nothing like mine. But I'm freaking fascinated by what he does, he sees big potential in what I do. I don't think that's an accident. It's way too easy to say that I love his work because I don't do that kind of stuff, and that he loves my work because he doesn't do that kind of stuff. But that's ignoring that on some level it's kind of the same thing. Street photographers take the mundane and chaotic bustle of everyday life and inject it with order, while I look at stuff like an ear of corn or a pile of intestines and say, "I'm gonna make this look good." Despite being on opposite ends of a spectrum, there's a very big commonality there which ties together. Things that seem completely different can absolutely totally relate to each other.




  
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Rushmore
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Jul 25, 2014 10:47 |  #44

I'm a proffessional beginner


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airfrogusmc
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Jul 25, 2014 10:56 |  #45

Clean Gene wrote in post #17054807 (external link)
Yeah, that's sort of what I meant. It SEEMS that the well-prepared get lucky consistently, but perceptions can be deceiving. It's not luck at all. Brilliant and spectacular and fascinating potential images happen all the time, that stuff is not rare in the least. It's just that it first requires learning to see it in the first place and then learning to capture it. And from what I can tell, THAT is the hard part. The people who are "well-prepared" and who do the work and have "developed" their instincts, totally seem to keep getting lucky, but it's not luck at all. It's an absolute assload of hard freaking work.

Anyway, there's one particular comment in there that struck my attention. He says something like, "there's studio photography and street photography. Some people want to pretend that life is like a movie, while street photographers say, 'show me.'"

At first that comment struck me as elitist as hell. As if it was dismissing studio (or contrived) photography as somehow being lesser. And it was also a little bit personally stinging, since nearly all of what I shoot is contrived or manipulated to some degree (either I'm posing a subject or constructing a scene or manipulating the light). But then I stopped and thought about it for a minute and was like, "wow, in a way he's totally freaking right."

Someone very recently asked me why I shoot what I shoot and why I shoot like I shoot. I didn't know. I'm not there yet. I'm still at the level where I know I can make cool images and I'm starting to develop a style, but I'm still a long way from piecing it all together and knowing what all of it is about and what it all means. The guy mentioned that I rarely shoot people, I almost totally focus on organics, and I have zero interest on whether what I'm shooting is pretty or grotesque. Like, why do I do that instead of photographing buildings or forks?

And I didn't really know, but I gave an educated guess. I think that I shoot what I shoot because I gravitate to disorder and chaos. I focus on the organic rather than the synthetic because organic things are more often chaotic and disordered and I am fascinated by getting structure out of disorder and chaos and am fascinated by making something ugly look good.

And like...Meyerowitz is right. Do you know who I have the utmost respect for? Street photographers. Do you know what I rarely ever do? Street photography. I think it might be because we're both kind of doing the same thing. We're trying to get order out of chaos. Some make the order, some find the order, but both are gravitating towards chaos and disorder and trying to make sense out of it. It's just that street photographers need to have a developed enough eye to see that when it happens. Whereas someone like me is more like, "crap, I can't see that. Screw it, I'll just make something." We're both sort of doing the same thing. But I sort of have to fabricate things because I'm not that good at seeing what's already there. Other people don't have to fabricate things, because their visual eye and developed instinct gives them so much stuff to shoot that they don't have to resort to fabricating it.

But it all kind of ties together, I think. The head of the photo department at my school freaking loves my images. I'd wager to say that out of all of the students he considers me one of his favorites (in terms of images, I suck as an actual student) because he's called me out on that publicly in front of my peers (which I have a problem with, but that's another matter). What does he shoot? Largely street photography. His photography is nothing like mine. But I'm freaking fascinated by what he does, he sees big potential in what I do. I don't think that's an accident. It's way too easy to say that I love his work because I don't do that kind of stuff, and that he loves my work because he doesn't do that kind of stuff. But that's ignoring that on some level it's kind of the same thing. Street photographers take the mundane and chaotic bustle of everyday life and inject it with order, while I look at stuff like an ear of corn or a pile of intestines and say, "I'm gonna make this look good." Despite being on opposite ends of a spectrum, there's a very big commonality there which ties together. Things that seem completely different can absolutely totally relate to each other.

I'd say not elitist and he is not making a judgement just saying some like the control of the studio and some prefer the chaos of the street. If there is a red car in the lot you can try and call it green all day long but it is still red. I also prefer when doing my own work to work in the chaos. A nice break from what I do to feed the family.




  
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