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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 24 Jul 2014 (Thursday) 18:53
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How to light black people?

 
quadwing
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Jul 25, 2014 20:41 |  #46

Aressem wrote in post #17056082 (external link)
The same place CRC got his 14-1200mm f1.2 IS III :p

Tack sharp at 1.8.


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Jul 25, 2014 21:05 |  #47

pwm2 wrote in post #17054542 (external link)
Pitch black costume + skin.
White dress + skin.
Easy to lose the structure of either the black or the white cloth - or skin.

So one of the reasons why a number of people wants Exmor-class dynamic range from their sensors.

I've run into this a couple of times. It can be tricky to correctly expose a person with dark skin, without blowing out the highlights and losing details in a wedding dress. More dynamic range definitely goes a long way, as its very hard to use a flash to light a persons skin, without also lighting the dress.


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Jul 25, 2014 23:31 |  #48

Aressem wrote in post #17056082 (external link)
The same place CRC got his 14-1200mm f1.2 IS III :p


Jeez, this Canon 14-1200mm f/1.2L IS III must weigh about 1000 lbs! :)


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Jul 26, 2014 09:23 |  #49

With only one light, place the darker person closest to it. After metering....


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Jul 27, 2014 18:20 |  #50

someone0 wrote in post #17054263 (external link)
IDK, I'm not a pro but isn't normally if you are to shoot in the snow, you would over expose by about 2 stops. Shooting dark skin subject I would have thought it goes the other way. That said, if you use a light meter, wouldn't that solves your problem? Another thing is, I think dark skin subject when lit properly, it show the dimention very well. Meaning having at least a few light sources to create both hard and soft light. The soft light would make a fill-in, while hard light create dramatic shadow.

My earlier comment was based on using an Incident (Hand held) Light Meter, not a Reflective (i.e. in Camera) Meter.

With DSLR, it's often as simple as reviewing the shot and dialing E.C.

The OP achieved some very nice results. I think he has found this added challenge was a bonus.


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Jul 28, 2014 19:32 as a reply to  @ CanonCameraFan's post |  #51

To the OP who asked how to "light" rather than how to "expose" here is a quote from http://portraitlightin​g.blogspot.com …-6-darker-skin-tones.html (external link)

"Defining Form with Shadow and Highlight

On light skin, the specular highlights ride on top of the glowing skin (diffuse highlight). These specular patches may enhance form, but that are not usually the primary feature that defines form and depth. On light skin, it is the difference in the areas of diffuse highlight and the surrounding shadows that give the face form.

With extremely dark skin, shadows and diffuse highlights may be so dark that distinguishing between them becomes difficult. At this extreme, form is rendered by the differences between the specular highlights and the surrounding areas, both shadow and diffuse highlight. Simply, or perhaps over-simply put, with light skin you create form and depth with shadows. With dark skin, you do so with highlights."


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kfreels
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Jul 29, 2014 08:04 |  #52

The only problem I've ever run into with darker skinned people is the greater contrast from hot spots. People of all skin colors have various ranges of oil to their skin which reflects more light, but as a person's skin gets darker, the contrast with the hot spots gets greater and it stands out more. With people with oily skin, you can work with the person to help tame it with things like powder, make-up, etc, and/or use broader and more even lighting.


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How to light black people?
FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
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