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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 31 Jul 2014 (Thursday) 08:23
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Indoor low light no flash cathedral lens?

 
Petie53
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Jul 31, 2014 16:48 |  #16

Think I will go all the way with the Sigma 200-500 F2.8!
$26 grand, 29", 35#. That should get some detail. :)

Guess it will come down to 2 lenses to be sure to have what I want. Going to try my 10-22 and 24-70 indoors at local large church to see how that works. Will use a monopod also for test.

Again thank you for all the great responses.
Oh and still think this is a great reason to get a 6D! ;)
Pete


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Absolutely ­ Fabulous
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Jul 31, 2014 16:57 |  #17

rivas8409 wrote in post #17068729 (external link)
Canon 200mm F/2L IS USM. Problem solved.

Details in high cathedral cielings? 200mm has some reach. CHECK!
Dark cathedrals, low light. F/2. CHECK!
F/2 still not fast enough? It's got at least a 4-stop IS! CHECK!
Look like a bada$$ with a white bazooka? CHECK!


But it's heavy!!!! That is what has stopped me buying one


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rivas8409
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Jul 31, 2014 17:41 |  #18

mwsilver wrote in post #17068866 (external link)
Only problem would be if the OP didn't wanted to carry around multiple lenses or the equivalent of small howitzer. This lens would certainly be great for details but would not be so great for the big picture. From the OP's original post it would seem he wants something wider. And of course at 5.6 lbs and $6000 it may not be a really good match for a 60D. :-)

From the OPs original post he mentions he wants reach for details. A few posts down he mentions the tall cathedral ceilings. I haven't read anything about "the big picture". Maybe I missed it.

Absolutely Fabulous wrote in post #17068942 (external link)
But it's heavy!!!! That is what has stopped me buying one

You mean the $6,000 price tag didn't? :lol:


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MalVeauX
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Jul 31, 2014 18:12 |  #19

Heya,

Unless you want to spend a lot of money and end up doing the same process, the simplest thing is to simply learn to do better post processing and handling of high noise and playing with dynamic range.

Focus on practicing exposing slightly to the right and using high ISO levels, higher than you're comfortable with. And then learning to process it and clean it up. Remember, it's not about what it looks like at 100% pixel peep. It's about what it looks like at actual view size (assuming you print, or assuming you are viewing in web media and not blown up to actual resolution).

This would be the case, even if you went to a 6D. It simply handles noise better. But you still will want to process the noise and learn to shoot lower light.

The best solution is a tripod.

The next best solution is high ISO and a 4 stop image stabilization lens and good post processing.

Very best,


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Absolutely ­ Fabulous
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Aug 01, 2014 03:33 |  #20

rivas8409 wrote in post #17069001 (external link)
You mean the $6,000 price tag didn't? :lol:


Nahhhh:p


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UKmitch86
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Aug 01, 2014 03:53 |  #21

rivas8409 wrote in post #17068729 (external link)
Canon 200mm F/2L IS USM. Problem solved.

Details in high cathedral cielings? 200mm has some reach. CHECK!
Dark cathedrals, low light. F/2. CHECK!
F/2 still not fast enough? It's got at least a 4-stop IS! CHECK!
Look like a bada$$ with a white bazooka? CHECK!

I'm getting thoroughly confused these days, not because I'm clueless, far from it, but because there seems to be a mantra being spread of, "oh, it's dark. You need a wide aperture". That makes absolutely no sense when creating the image is the first priority, and DoF is plainly the OPs requirement. He doesn't even need a wide aperture to start with for easier focusing in low light, he can just hyperfocal in a cathedral.

He needs a tripod or probably more practical, a keen eye to rest his camera somewhere that means he doesn't need to bring a tripod in.


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artyH
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Aug 01, 2014 10:01 |  #22

It depends on the cathedral. A slow zoom, even with IS won't do with the 60D when you are at the long end at F5.6, as at Notre Dame. You need a wide lens for some cathedrals, and a long one for others. You really need more than one lens, depending on the scenario and lighting.
What you need is a 17-135 F2 zoom, but this is a fantasy.




  
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mwsilver
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Aug 01, 2014 10:26 |  #23

artyH wrote in post #17070162 (external link)
It depends on the cathedral. A slow zoom, even with IS won't do with the 60D when you are at the long end at F5.6, as at Notre Dame. You need a wide lens for some cathedrals, and a long one for others. You really need more than one lens, depending on the scenario and lighting.
What you need is a 17-135 F2 zoom, but this is a fantasy.

While you're at it, why not make it a 16-300mm, (like the new Tamron) but f/2 and IS! If you're going to fantasize you might as well go all the way. :cool:


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Aug 01, 2014 18:47 |  #24

OP, coming from a 60D just six months ago I can certainly say that upgrading to a 6D was the best high ISO upgrade I could have made, having L glass already, for the money.


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Aug 01, 2014 19:30 as a reply to  @ mickeyb105's post |  #25

^This. I too came from a 60D and it seems shooting at 12800 on the 6D is like what shooting at 1600 was on the 60D.




  
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Petie53
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Aug 01, 2014 19:54 as a reply to  @ MalVeauX's post |  #26

A big Thank You to MalVeauX and UKmitch86 for stating what should have been obvious and common sense to me but wasn't. Being relatively new to this, it just had not sunk in that having a really wide aperture lens does not make it better in many or maybe most low light usages. I still need to use larger aperture settings for most of my shots. Duh!! :)
Ok - so my current lenses should be fine for what I plan to do. Will try to improve my monopod usage as far as stabilization.
Quick question - if using an IS lens on a monopod, what stabilization setting should I use? Setting 1 is all direction stabilization and mode 2 I believe is mostly vertical to allow panning so thinking mode 1.


Pete
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gocolts
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Aug 01, 2014 20:34 |  #27

6D + 16-35 f/4L is the best combo/cost ration for such a task. You'll have to consider if the investment in gear would be worth it.




  
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Aug 01, 2014 22:33 |  #28

Petie53 wrote in post #17067909 (external link)
I have a 60D and my only low light type lens is my 24-70 F2.8L.
What would you recommend for indoor no-flash usage in cathedrals and other large room low light usage? Would think I would need a zoom and maybe my current 24-70 is the best available range. Was wondering if a prime like an 85 with a 1.8 or better F stop would be better - loose the zoom though. Have been in some large cathedrals and sometimes I really need some reach to get details. What would you use?
Probably the best answer is to get a 6D! :)
Pete

Note that you may not be allowed to use either a tripod or a monopod inside a Cathedral.

60D and Cathedrals? Here's what works for me. I have used the Canon EF 28mm f/1.8 USM very successfully for handheld situations. If you look at the photos in the album linked below, you can click on "Info" to get basic shooting info.

Basilica, Washington, DC
http://grahamglover.ze​nfolio.com/p34082360 (external link)

This was done with ISO 3200, 1/50s, f/3.2.

IMAGE: http://grahamglover.zenfolio.com/img/s4/v62/p1119055286-4.jpg

Here's a link to a bunch of my work, hosted on Zenfolio. You'll see a variety of Cathedrals here with photos taken with various cameras. For the XSi and 60D handheld, the 28mm works great. In one of the recent albums, NYC July 2014, I have a few interior shots of St. Patrick's taken with the 5DM3 and the EF 50mm f/1.4 USM. The 28mm for crop and 50mm for full frame are great lenses for inside a Cathedral if you can't use a tripod.

http://grahamglover.ze​nfolio.com/f593136965 (external link)

Lastly though, you can use almost anything today. Here's one from the Franciscan Monastery in DC. It was taken with a Canon ELPH 330 on a railing using ISO 3200, 1/15s, and f/4.5. Yes, that's a "cheap point and shoot".

Hope this helps!

IMAGE: http://grahamglover.zenfolio.com/img/s10/v102/p148745222-4.jpg

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DreDaze
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Aug 01, 2014 22:51 |  #29

work on your handholding technique, and use a telephoto with IS...you should be able to handhold some pretty low shutter speeds...like 1/25 at 250mm or even slower...it may take 3 or 4 shots, but one should work out...instead of your 24-70f2.8, maybe the tamron VC version? it would allow you to handhold for 3 stops or so


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viperbass
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Aug 05, 2014 18:50 |  #30

On my last trip yo Europe I used a Canon 28 1.8 for my lowlight shots. It did a great job on my 60D.

Some churches/museums do not allow flash photography, so a fast lens is a must.
For $450 or so the 28 1.8 is a good buy for a prime that can be used on FF if you eventually upgrade.




  
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Indoor low light no flash cathedral lens?
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