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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 06 Aug 2014 (Wednesday) 06:16
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Is image stabilisation really important for sports photography?

 
DreDaze
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Aug 06, 2014 12:09 |  #16

i would think that 400mm would be way too long for any snowboarding shots...but then i'd probably think 100mm would be too long for that as well...i guess i'm thinking more scenic shots with snowboarders in them...but just to frame a 6' tall snowboarder at 400mm, you'd have to be 110 ft away in portrait orientation, and 160 ft away for a regular orientation....that seems way to far for me, and if you're on a mountain with others, there's a good chance someone else comes shooting in between the two of you.

oh, and like others, i find IS is good at stabilizing the viewfinder, even when the shutter speed is fast enough to stop any shake


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Aug 06, 2014 21:28 |  #17

Hi Everyone!

Wow! I'm amazed by the amount of people here who are willing to share so much knowledge and information to a newbie!

Thank you all for your contributions, I really do appreciate it!

I'm so glad I found this website, it's been very informative and has helped me a LOT!

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bobbyz
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Aug 06, 2014 21:47 |  #18

Both surfing and snowboarding don't require high ISOs so any camera even older 1dmk2 would do fine. You don't need no IS for these either. And I have had both 300mm f2.8 IS and 500mm f4 IS for sports. 500mm with 1.4xTC was go to lens for surfing. Wish I had 600mm f4.

Snowboarding you probably need strobes and wider lens not long.


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deanedward
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Aug 06, 2014 21:58 |  #19

To an extent, IS may also come in handy for sports photography by helping you (the photographer) in terms of keeping things steady. While the general rule is to keep shutter speeds high, there are also some action photos shot with lower/slower shutter speeds to show subject motion (such as panning among other things) and you'll find IS very useful for that.


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Aug 07, 2014 05:52 |  #20

Scott M wrote in post #17080098 (external link)
While the Tamron 150-600mm telephoto intrigues me, it's added size over the 100-400L is an issue in my particular case.

I was thinking of hiring one, but this description put me off -

Of course it's tempting to compare this lens with more expensive super-telephotos, and of course by those standards it's going to come up a bit short. The autofocus is slow, and capturing fast-moving subjects could be tricky. In poor light the AF has a tendency to hunt, even with static subjects: this is a lens which really likes contrasty targets. And whilst its images are quite sharp over most of the zoom range, sharpness does fall off beyond about 500mm.

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Tapeman
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Aug 07, 2014 09:14 |  #21

IMO IS never hurts. I never turn it off. However you can still get great photos without it. Fast moving subjects (like sports) need a high shutter speed to freeze action and IS matters less.

I'd recommend IS if you can afford it, chances are sports is not all will you shoot.


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Aug 07, 2014 15:12 |  #22

hollis_f wrote in post #17081561 (external link)
I was thinking of hiring one, but this description put me off -


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Frank I am glad that you posted this. I was supposed to order a 100-400 for next weekend (16/17th) for an airshow from them, but have been procrastinating. They have only just got these in, and I have been wanting to try one, so the Tamron is now ordered for next week. I'll let you know what I think of it. I hope it will be as good as the 100-400's I have rented in the past.

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Talley
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Aug 07, 2014 15:17 |  #23

Even though your at high shutter the IS helps keeping the lens stabilized and it helps the autofocus out by jumping around less.

I watched a video of a Canon tech explaining that once.


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Aug 07, 2014 15:27 |  #24

95% of the time IS is OFF on my 70-200 when shooting sports. The only time I really turn it on is for non action shots of people on the bench, in the penalty box, or someone in the stands. For players moving across the floor, the extra delay it causes in getting a focus lock and shutter release is not worth missing peak action. Cameras I shoot with are 1D4 and 5D3. If you cant keep an AF box on a subject at 200mm without IS engaged, you really should be working on your shooting technique IMHO.


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soccersnaps
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Aug 07, 2014 15:55 |  #25

there are also some action photos shot with lower/slower shutter speeds to show subject motion (such as panning among other things) and you'll find IS very useful for that.

I would recommend turning is off for panning, you want to introduce blur or oof background in an image and is will try to counter that.


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hollis_f
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Aug 07, 2014 16:16 |  #26

soccersnaps wrote in post #17082573 (external link)
I would recommend turning is off for panning, you want to introduce blur or oof background in an image and is will try to counter that.

Au contraire. If your lens has dual–mode IS then panning shots are a lot better if done using mode 2 IS.


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Aug 07, 2014 16:21 |  #27

soccersnaps wrote in post #17082573 (external link)
I would recommend turning is off for panning, you want to introduce blur or oof background in an image and is will try to counter that.

Most lenses have two IS modes, mode one for twin axis stabilisation and mode two for single axis stabilisation. The second works extremely well for panning. The only IS lens I have used is the Canon 100-400 L IS, but it worked exceptionally well. The panning mode seems to work no matter what direction you are actually panning in. It seems to allow a major axis of motion while stabilising the lens in the other direction. I used the lens for shooting airshows, both with the camera held horizontal and vertical and also while following aircraft that had motion in both the vertical and horizontal planes. I even managed shots hand held of a Sea King Helicopter at 400mm and 1/80. The IS works very well for this.

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Aug 07, 2014 19:17 |  #28

Probably a bit against the grain here but towards the end of last year I started a little research on IS for my photography needs. I am primarily a wildlife photographer using a Canon 800 F5.6 L IS both hand held and off a tripod.
I have found that I can acquire subjects quicker and track them better with the IS turned off, giving me a higher keeper rate. Naturally IS a a great tool to have in reserve when there is not enough light, but that is where it stays "In Reserve" for emergency use only.
All 4 of my IS capable lenses now have this function turned off and I am liking the results, so much so that (except for 1 minute or so) I have yet to use IS this year.
Try turning it off and see how you get on, after all for sports you are going to want at least 1/500 sec so IS isn't going to be much help on any lens, well it certainly isn't on mine!


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bobbyz
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Aug 07, 2014 19:55 |  #29

Personally I never seen IS help me track better in the VF. Now when using 700mm on tripod for wildlife yes but not at 300/400mm f2.8 for sports.


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soccersnaps
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Aug 20, 2014 19:41 |  #30

i have to admit, some tests i did with my 400 f2.8 at brands hatch recently were mode1 or off, i never tried mode2. i did prefer the motion blur with is off......i don't normally do motor sport but will try mode 2 next time out.
not sure johnf3f, like you most of my sport is carried out at high shutter speed so IS is not used, but when panning lower shutter speeds are needed to blur the background and i can see now maybe mode 2 is worth trying, i will give it a go.
i guess its easy to fall into the trap of what is normal for the sports we may shoot, soccer maybe golf, hockey etc, but overlook what is good for other sports.


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Is image stabilisation really important for sports photography?
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