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Thread started 11 Aug 2014 (Monday) 22:28
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grungy industrial background for product photography

 
TTUShooter
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Aug 11, 2014 22:28 |  #1

I'm seeking suggestions for a grungy industrial type background for product photography shots. the items being photographed are small metal machined parts.

i am thinking something like weathered diamond plate or things of the like, but i'm drawing blanks on what else, and also where to get ahold of it.

Any ideas?

thanks in advance


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Scatterbrained
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Aug 11, 2014 22:37 |  #2

Maybe a grimy, beat up old workbench top? I can't imagine it would be too hard to find something like that. Any wooden work bench that 's seen serious use will not only have the dents, knicks and scratches to go with it, but oil and grease stains as well. Could be interesting. Or maybe a seriously well used stainless steel worktop from an old toolbox or work surface. Check the tools section of Craigslist, or the farm section. I'd imagine there are just as many people selling off old tools and shop equipment there as there are here.


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Clean ­ Gene
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Aug 11, 2014 23:02 |  #3

Have you tried visiting a junkyard, and just picking up whatever looks cool?




  
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TTUShooter
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Aug 11, 2014 23:06 |  #4

Clean Gene wrote in post #17090390 (external link)
Have you tried visiting a junkyard, and just picking up whatever looks cool?

not yet, in the brainstorming phase, that was on my list.


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farmer1957
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Aug 12, 2014 15:35 |  #5

TTUShooter wrote in post #17090351 (external link)
I'm seeking suggestions for a grungy industrial type background for product photography shots. the items being photographed are small metal machined parts.

i am thinking something like weathered diamond plate or things of the like, but i'm drawing blanks on what else, and also where to get ahold of it.

Any ideas?

thanks in advance

Product photography, comes with rules or possible customer satisfaction problems.
Just as much as you want to show the product you want to make sure the customer doesn't get confused.

Pretty much rule NO 1 is don't have anything else in the picture except the product....

The book Light science and Magic has helped me more in product photography then any other book i have bought.

What is the product you are wanting photograph ?

I do not know if reflective back grounds is the best idea.

Word reflective = polarized reflection and UV reflection and what images it will reflect like a mirror.

What lens and lighting are you plan on using?


Why are you using a cropped body on Product photography ?

If you have a example of what look you really want can you post a picture please.

Farmer




  
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Alveric
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Aug 12, 2014 15:48 |  #6
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farmer1957 wrote in post #17091721 (external link)
Product photography, comes with rules or possible customer satisfaction problems.
Just as much as you want to show the product you want to make sure the customer doesn't get confused.

Pretty much rule NO 1 is don't have anything else in the picture except the product....

The book Light science and Magic has helped me more in product photography then any other book i have bought.

What is the product you are wanting photograph ?

I do not know if reflective back grounds is the best idea.

Word reflective = polarized reflection and UV reflection and what images it will reflect like a mirror.

What lens and lighting are you plan on using?


Why are you using a cropped body on Product photography ?

If you have a example of what look you really want can you post a picture please.

Farmer

Well, it depends on what kind of shot he's after.

There're three main kinds of product photos:

1) Drop and shoot: the product alone in a clear and clean background. Your suggestions apply fully to this one.

2) Beauty shot: a more stylistic, heroic even, portrayal of the product (which seems to me is what the OP wants here). Whilst clutter is a no-no, the backgrounds and props do not need to be so clinical that it looks like a drop-and-shoot on steroids.

3) The illustrative image: the product may not even appear in this one. This is the kind of image that sells the idea or need for the product. A factory worker at the bench or even out in the field looking into the sun would be this kind of photo.


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Scatterbrained
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Aug 12, 2014 17:00 |  #7

farmer1957 wrote in post #17091721 (external link)
Product photography, comes with rules or possible customer satisfaction problems.
Just as much as you want to show the product you want to make sure the customer doesn't get confused.

Pretty much rule NO 1 is don't have anything else in the picture except the product....

The book Light science and Magic has helped me more in product photography then any other book i have bought.

What is the product you are wanting photograph ?

I do not know if reflective back grounds is the best idea.

Word reflective = polarized reflection and UV reflection and what images it will reflect like a mirror.

What lens and lighting are you plan on using?


Why are you using a cropped body on Product photography ?

If you have a example of what look you really want can you post a picture please.

Farmer

There's more to product photography than just drop shots. ;)


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Aug 12, 2014 17:23 |  #8

Scatterbrained wrote in post #17091934 (external link)
There's more to product photography than just drop shots. ;)

exactly


Are you shooting them at the shop they are made in, or are they giving them to you to shoot in a studio environment?

With product photography, I like to convey the feeling/identity of the company or product you are shooting, or follow their marketing treatment. For example, if the company is a machining/manufacturin​g company, the pieces in a pile of metal chips almost always looks good.


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Aug 12, 2014 23:32 |  #9

steelbluesleepr wrote in post #17091986 (external link)
exactly


Are you shooting them at the shop they are made in, or are they giving them to you to shoot in a studio environment?

With product photography, I like to convey the feeling/identity of the company or product you are shooting, or follow their marketing treatment. For example, if the company is a machining/manufacturin​g company, the pieces in a pile of metal chips almost always looks good.

I am not going to disagree with you guys but i have had some buyers try to pull a fast one on me.
I own a machine shop, I did a product photo on top of a 40,000 $ CNC. Computerized controlled mill.

The customer bought the product that was sitting on the CNC and then demanded everything in the picture. As in the CNC too,

I refunded the customers money with in 10 minutes of receiving payment from the customer and found out he wanted everything in the picture.

I don't know what else to say except that I only photograph the product and try to have zero props or other items in the picture.

Farmer




  
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steelbluesleepr
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Aug 12, 2014 23:35 as a reply to  @ farmer1957's post |  #10

that's what a contract is for.


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Aug 13, 2014 00:06 |  #11

farmer1957 wrote in post #17092649 (external link)
I am not going to disagree with you guys but i have had some buyers try to pull a fast one on me.
I own a machine shop, I did a product photo on top of a 40,000 $ CNC. Computerized controlled mill.

The customer bought the product that was sitting on the CNC and then demanded everything in the picture. As in the CNC too,

I refunded the customers money with in 10 minutes of receiving payment from the customer and found out he wanted everything in the picture.

I don't know what else to say except that I only photograph the product and try to have zero props or other items in the picture.

Farmer

Haven't you ever heard the phrase "accessories not included"? Products are shot with props all the time. When you go to the grocery store, you don't expect to get the cooler and ice when you buy beer, just because the photo shows the beer in a cooler full of ice do you?


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Tom ­ Reichner
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Aug 13, 2014 00:22 |  #12

The OP never said he/she was doing these shots for commercial purposes, yet it seems that almost everyone who has responded has assumed that advertising or commercial usage is to be the intended use of the photos.

I myself have photographed numerous products just because I wanted to be creative and make cool-looking photos of products, even though I have no affiliations with the manufacturers, and no interest in ever marketing or selling the products or my photos of them.

Anyway, I think that expanded metal could be used effectively as a background for the items the OP is interested in photographing. It gets rusty right away, and he/she could experiment with different looks by using different things behind the expanded metal, such as shiny stainless steel, flat black foam core board, etc.

Here's a link to expanded metal images, in case the OP is not familiar with it:
http://www.google.com …kQ_AUoAg&biw=12​87&bih=941 (external link)

The photos all show shiny, unrusted metal, although in reality, any time I go to a steel supply yard to buy it, it is generally rather rusty (even though it is brand new, and even though it has never been outside in the weather).


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
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Jeff ­ Colburn
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Aug 13, 2014 18:26 |  #13

Depending on what you're shooting, you could try green screen, then you can use anything for a background.

Have Fun,
Jeff


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Dec 03, 2014 22:51 |  #14

What I would do - for whatever it's worth - is use something not metal or metal-oriented as the background. Try lining up some grungy, well-used pallets, pull the best-looking pieces off, glue them together and create a simulated workbench (think 'grandpa's workbench'). Use some used motor oil in places as a stain. Dark walnut stain in areas, as well. Don't be afraid to mess it up a little.
Whatever you do, don't put any kind of semi-gloss or gloss finish on it. Just rub one application of linseed oil into it, and leave it at that.

The idea is not only creating a faux location, but also a contrast where the well-used space almost pales in comparison to the shiny, freshly machined objects.



  
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Jan 02, 2015 20:26 |  #15

I had an idea to make it look like a machinist is working on the next product. Get some junk metal to cut up or grind. Buy a cheap grinder, or borrow one from a friend, cheap used one on craigslist...... Try positioning the product on the diamond plate or bench and for the background try to have a workshop type scene with a person cutting or grinding the scrap metal to make sparks. This would give the effect that he is maybe cutting out another part.


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