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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Macro Talk 
Thread started 19 Aug 2014 (Tuesday) 08:44
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damn what went wrong here? (i.e what settings should i use?)

 
rasseru
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Aug 19, 2014 08:44 |  #1

canon 600D, i wasnt using live mode - and ended up with these over exposed blurry images

IMAGE: http://s30.postimg.org/noxu32k1t/damn.jpg


what setting should i have been using for a lovely sunny day? ive since been mucking about and dont know what setting it was on. the flash was on.

is there a standard mode people use for macro? (i always use a manual type but dont understand them fully yet so i try all of them out, still finding it hard to navigate the menu system - only had a camera 3 weeks)


newbie alert - cheers!



  
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dustyporch
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Aug 19, 2014 08:56 |  #2

The overexposed is probably because of the sync speed of the popup flash. What would happen is this:

If you are in Av mode, the correct ambient light exposure is 1/1000th, f4, iso100 (just a guess). The popup flash requires a shutter speed of 1/200th of a second (or slower) to work. When you take the photo, the shutter speed reverts to 1/200th as required by the flash, and BANG. Instant overexposure.

To fix this you can:
- use Tv mode, setting the shutter to 1/200th or slower.
- use Av mode, and stop down until the shutter speed gets to 1/200th
- use an external speedlight flash, which has High Speed Sync and can overcome the 1/200th limitation
- turn off the flash

I've simplified some things here to make the explanation more clear... but that is the basic problem.

Note: When this is about to happen, your camera will blink the shutter speed on the screen when you half-press the shutter. Kind of a warning, although it can be hard to notice.


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dustyporch
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Aug 19, 2014 08:58 |  #3

Oh, blurry. It looks to me like you are too close, and are inside the lens' minimum focusing distance.


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rasseru
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Aug 19, 2014 09:14 |  #4

nah they were quite a few good ones in focus, dustyporch :] there were about 50 different photos of loads of great bugs :/

i thought i should always have the flash on, ive seen macro videos and people always seem to use it..

so, do you think TV mode would be good, there was a spider spinning a web, legs moving, and i caught a flying beetle, several flying insects, or just lose the flash?

100mm canon macro lens btw




  
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rasseru
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Aug 19, 2014 09:15 |  #5

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spider spinning web. what setting would you use?



  
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jt354
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Aug 19, 2014 09:38 |  #6

If you're shooting macro with flash, it is best to use Tv or manual mode to lock shutter speed at maximum sync speed (1/200 or 1/250 depending on your camera). In Tv the camera will stop down the aperture as necessary to maintain that shutter speed, resulting in maximum depth of field (which can often be desirable for macro). In manual mode you will have to pay attention to varying light conditions if using only the pop-up flash, adjusting aperture accordingly. Manual with auto-ISO would be a good compromise as the sensor gain will self-adjust to help maintain proper exposure.


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rasseru
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Aug 19, 2014 09:40 |  #7

ill go try catch some more and report back :]




  
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rasseru
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Aug 19, 2014 10:24 |  #8

my paper cup diffuser was letting light out, but that shouldnt explain the blurryness should it?

or is that just part of the learning process - lots of blurry shots and a few good ones? i.e. wind/hand shake...

does the 100mm IS lens make a big difference with sharp vs blurry shots because of hand shake at such short distance?




  
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timrocks311
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Aug 19, 2014 19:23 |  #9

rasseru wrote in post #17105352 (external link)
does the 100mm IS lens make a big difference with sharp vs blurry shots because of hand shake at such short distance?

i think so. i have the 100L with IS and bought it over the standard 100 because i knew i'd mostly hand hold. i feel like i can shot down to 1/60 and keep it sharp. i think most of the problem with macro is not necessarily hand shake but missed focus.

that being said, it does look like your first image is hand shake. the spider is quite good except for his legs getting in the way. also the flash is a bit harsh on him. i was having trouble with overexposure from too direct of a flash that i feel wasn't diffused properly.


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orionmystery
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Aug 20, 2014 01:59 |  #10

Most of us that shoot with flash tend to use 1/200 or 1/250, F11 - 16, ISO100/200 (typical full flash setting). http://orionmystery.bl​ogspot.com …photography-3-things.html (external link)

However, I enjoy doing natural light macro as well, mostly with tripod but not always:
http://orionmystery.bl​ogspot.com …g-with-natural-light.html (external link)


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rasseru
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Aug 20, 2014 05:06 |  #11

timrocks311 wrote in post #17106299 (external link)
i think most of the problem with macro is not necessarily hand shake but missed focus.



the focus was quite (low?) so i had a great depth of field, and its not just this shot, there were about 50 like it - i know what you mean when you have 1mm DOF and the bugger moves, but this wasnt like that, everything, even a leaf, was overblown and blurry, even at half focal length (correct terminology?)

timrocks311 wrote in post #17106299 (external link)
that being said, it does look like your first image is hand shake.

argh i want the IS model now!




  
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rasseru
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Aug 20, 2014 05:08 |  #12

orionmystery wrote in post #17106804 (external link)
Most of us that shoot with flash tend to use 1/200 or 1/250, F11 - 16, ISO100/200 (typical full flash setting). http://orionmystery.bl​ogspot.com …photography-3-things.html (external link)

However, I enjoy doing natural light macro as well, mostly with tripod but not always:
http://orionmystery.bl​ogspot.com …g-with-natural-light.html (external link)

thankyou for that - i'll read it when my brain has woken up, had a late night last night :]




  
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wayne9999
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Aug 22, 2014 23:38 |  #13

rasseru wrote in post #17106937 (external link)
the focus was quite (low?) so i had a great depth of field, and its not just this shot, there were about 50 like it - i know what you mean when you have 1mm DOF and the bugger moves, but this wasnt like that, everything, even a leaf, was overblown and blurry, even at half focal length (correct terminology?)

argh i want the IS model now!

I'm surprised nobody else has commented on this, and you certainly don't want to take my word for anything. I thought that a lot of people don't use/need/want IS for macro though. At least that's what I remember from reading a lot of back posts on the topic, but someone can correctly if I am remembering wrong.




  
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Archibald
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Aug 23, 2014 00:13 |  #14

Hi, Rasseru.

There are lots of ways to shoot a macro photograph, and most are going to give crappy results. If you are keen on the subject, then spend some time reading about macro. You will learn lots about it and your pics will improve a lot.

The main technical problems in macro are lighting, DOF, getting sharp focus, and camera/subject movement.

You can solve the DOF problem by setting your lens to f11 or f13.

Stopping down like that reduces the light hitting the sensor. In full sunlight (no flash), and an appropriate ISO, you can usually still get a good shutter speed to freeze motion sufficiently and get good captures.

Alternatively you can use flash. Flash provides lots of light and stops motion (because the light of the flash is a very short burst). Just make sure, as others have mentioned, that you don't get excessive ambient light. Check your settings before shooting, and also check the EXIF afterwards, and make sure they are right if you are trouble-shooting.

Flash provides the best and easiest way to ensure a good exposure and no subject/camera blur. But flash makes a harsh light. I would ignore that for now, while you are troubleshooting. But eventually you will want to diffuse the flash. And that is a whole new topic that could fill many pages.

Apart from all this, focus needs to be right. You want your focus to be right on the eyeballs of the subject. For small subjects waving in the wind, and a handheld camera, that can be very hard to achieve. So shoot lots of pics of the exact same scene, maybe even 50 or 100, and select the ones that are sharpest in the place where they need to be.

You could also set up your tripod (ask the bug to wait), and use Liveview to get dead sharp focus on the eyes. By the time you are set up and in range of the bug, pushing the tripod legs back and forth a quarter of an inch here and there, the bug is long gone. Ha ha. This technique is not good for living bugs. It is great for shooting things that don't move, though.

Auto focus can be real useful for macro shots where you are not too close to the subject. But if you are real close to your subject, AF can work at cross purposes and should be turned off.

IS can be very useful IMO for macro shots, but at close range its usefulness is limited.

Macro is great fun and you can get some super pics. But as with everything else, you need to practice, review, learn, analyze a bit, and repeat. Then you too will get great closeup shots.


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damn what went wrong here? (i.e what settings should i use?)
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