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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Critique Corner 
Thread started 22 Aug 2014 (Friday) 10:07
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How do i make realistic scratches?

 
GotNoCents
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Aug 22, 2014 10:07 |  #1

Hello, i am quite the novice at this. any constructive criticism about this picture will be greatly appreciated! Specific tips about the scratches would be great! thanks =)

P.S. this is my second post because...i mistakenly posted this under the People section as well. Sorry mods, please be kind enough to delete that thread for me...

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IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/oRqe​sL  (external link) Cher (external link) by TheLonelySoul (external link), on Flickr

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joedlh
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Aug 22, 2014 19:22 |  #2

Off hand, I don't think you'll have great success in finding a scratch expert on this forum. It's a pretty esoteric area. You might be the pioneer. You might have more success if you found a scratchable surface and captured real scratches.

Beautiful model, by the way.


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Editing ok

  
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Tiberius
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Aug 22, 2014 20:02 |  #3

I'd start by finding pictures of actual scratched paint. You might then be able to composite those scratches in.


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Dave3222
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Aug 22, 2014 20:46 |  #4

You didn't mention what editor you use. If you have Photoshop, there are many free brushes you can download that may enable you to get the realistic look you desire. Here's just one:
http://www.soultravelm​ultimedia.com …hotoshop-scratch-brushes/ (external link)




  
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GotNoCents
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Aug 22, 2014 22:00 |  #5

thanks for the tips guys!

Dave - i'll definitely try those out =D


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cmh512
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Aug 24, 2014 11:58 |  #6

In part the scratches don't look real because the model's hand is not in a scratching position. Her fingernails need to be touching the surface, not the pads of her fingers.


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GotNoCents
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Aug 25, 2014 07:35 |  #7

cmh512 wrote in post #17114750 (external link)
In part the scratches don't look real because the model's hand is not in a scratching position. Her fingernails need to be touching the surface, not the pads of her fingers.

noted! thanks!


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sandpiper
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Aug 25, 2014 09:23 |  #8

cmh512 wrote in post #17114750 (external link)
In part the scratches don't look real because the model's hand is not in a scratching position. Her fingernails need to be touching the surface, not the pads of her fingers.

Yeah, also the scratches look wrong to me too. Each scratch is a lot of fine scratches together, as if you had taken a pen and scribbled side to side. Some of the scratches are even V-shaped, where you appear to have reversed direction, and the scratch for the middle finger continues over the top of the finger !! A single fingernail wouldn't produce so many fine scratches, all following different paths, it would be a single wider scratch with ragged edges. If there were to be a secondary scratch it would be parallel, as the nail is moving in a specific direction.

The best technique would be to find a suitably shaped tool to actually scratch an old piece of wood with four scratches (don't do one for the thumb, it is all but impossible to have the thumb at an angle where it would scratch, and if it did it would be a very fine line - the thumbnail is edge on when the fingernails are flat) then get your model to dig her nails in at the end of the scratches. If you don't want to scratch the same piece you use in the shot, just blend the scratches in when you edit.




  
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GotNoCents
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Aug 25, 2014 23:14 |  #9

sandpiper wrote in post #17116350 (external link)
Yeah, also the scratches look wrong to me too. Each scratch is a lot of fine scratches together, as if you had taken a pen and scribbled side to side. Some of the scratches are even V-shaped, where you appear to have reversed direction, and the scratch for the middle finger continues over the top of the finger !! A single fingernail wouldn't produce so many fine scratches, all following different paths, it would be a single wider scratch with ragged edges. If there were to be a secondary scratch it would be parallel, as the nail is moving in a specific direction.

The best technique would be to find a suitably shaped tool to actually scratch an old piece of wood with four scratches (don't do one for the thumb, it is all but impossible to have the thumb at an angle where it would scratch, and if it did it would be a very fine line - the thumbnail is edge on when the fingernails are flat) then get your model to dig her nails in at the end of the scratches. If you don't want to scratch the same piece you use in the shot, just blend the scratches in when you edit.

will remember this when i try it the next time! thanks for the tips :)


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Abu ­ Mahendra
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Aug 25, 2014 23:25 |  #10
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GotNoCents wrote in post #17111302 (external link)
Hello, i am quite the novice at this. any constructive criticism about this picture will be greatly appreciated! Specific tips about the scratches would be great! thanks =)

P.S. this is my second post because...i mistakenly posted this under the People section as well. Sorry mods, please be kind enough to delete that thread for me...

QUOTED IMAGE
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/oRqe​sL  (external link) Cher (external link) by TheLonelySoul (external link), on Flickr

Forget the scratches. Focus on the beautiful facial features of the model. Gorgeous.




  
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Clean ­ Gene
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Aug 29, 2014 03:19 |  #11

Abu Mahendra wrote in post #17117943 (external link)
Forget the scratches. Focus on the beautiful facial features of the model. Gorgeous.


No offense, but that's a little bit like watching an early cut of Mulholland Dr and saying, "forget the weirdness, focus on those actresses' boobs. So awesome."

Not that I'm trying to put this photographer on David Lynch's level, but the point still stands. If this photograph was primarily ABOUT the model being gorgeous, then he/she wouldn't be focusing so much on the scratches.

Not that there's even anything wrong with simply focusing on the facial features of a gorgeous model. If that's what you do, then okay. That's what you do. I just don't really see the merit in looking at a photographer who wants to go one way and then saying, "screw that, do something else entirely." I mean, I love Ansel Adams' work, but if I ever find myself telling a Nan Goldin to be an Ansel Adams, then I think I'm critiquing wrongly.




  
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How do i make realistic scratches?
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