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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 14 Sep 2014 (Sunday) 12:03
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Too Much ISO? Equestrian Event

 
Bogino
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Sep 14, 2014 12:03 |  #1

Was shooting these riding shots in TV mode (Canon 60D). Indoor arena and setting was at 1/320 and ISO of 2000 and 2500. Is TV still the best option for this type of event or should I be using a different Mode? I'll be shooting again today during part 2 of the event. Thank You.


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JeffreyG
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Sep 14, 2014 12:31 |  #2

That looks to be indoors, so I suspect the lighting is generally close to even around the ring. In such situations, there really isn't much to be gained by using an auto exposure mode. You might as well just use M mode, set up the exposure once and then forget it.

If the lighting is not even or changing, you will want to use an auto-metered mode like Av, Tv or M mode with auto-ISO selected.

In low light action shooting, I like M-mode with auto ISO (provided your 60-D will do this). You select the largest aperture your lens has, the minimum shutter speed you need for the shot, and then the camera will give you the minimum ISO to get the picture.

Av and Tv both require that you select the minimum ISO for the darkest possible shot you will take. Otherwise each mode will do something you don't like, Tv will run into the aperture limit of the lens and start to underexpose and Av will start to select too slow of shutter speeds.

When I am scratching for every bit of light, I really do not want to pick the safest (*highest) ISO and then have the camera meter stoppoing down the lens and wasting the light.


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digital ­ paradise
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Sep 14, 2014 12:52 |  #3

1/320 is a tad slow. You can see a bit of motion blur on there horses feet if you want to freeze everything. Some blur can have a really good effect so it is up to you.

I prefer M or Av mode to Tv. Like Jeffrey said you have to careful to pay attention to shutter speeds in Av. At those distances you can shoot with your lens pretty much wide open. Higher ISO these days is not an issue with correct exposure. Even ⅓ stop over or a bit more more makes noise minimal and easy to clean up after in PP. On a few occasions I had to shoot 12,800 with my 7D.


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Bogino
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Sep 14, 2014 13:00 as a reply to  @ digital paradise's post |  #4

The arena is indoors. I'm using a Canon 70-200mm 1:4 L lens. I've picked 1 single spot to shoot from so am not moving around or anything. The riding routine is about 3 minutes and I know the routine so I just sit and wait to pick my "moments" to shoot. For today I'll set ISO on Auto ISO as suggested and use either AV or M mode and try to maintain F stop somewhere around f8 - f11. and hopefully get my shutter speed correct.


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Sep 14, 2014 13:03 |  #5

Honestly f11 is far to small in indoor conditions for a moving animal unless you're ok with the ISO going right up to its highest. Sure f11 gives you a nice depth of field (esp on a larger animal like a horse) and is plenty sharp enough, but its just not going to be very practical.

I'd suggest 1/500sec as the slowest shutter speed in an ideal situation. Aperture wise I'd drop right down to f5.6, maybe f8 if you've got enough light/ISO.

I'd shoot in manual or aperture priority mode - leave ISO high or on auto and keep that shutter speed up to 1/500sec or faster.


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JeffreyG
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Sep 14, 2014 13:06 |  #6

If you are worried about too high of an ISO, why would you stop down to f/8-f/11? I suspect that is way too small of an aperture for indoor equestrian.

My suggestion would be to place the camera in M mode and select f/4 and 1/800. Then adjust the ISO manually until you can place white tones on the far right of the histogram. Look for some white pants on a rider or something and use those to adjust exposure.

Only change ISO to 'auto' if you note that the light is significantly different in various parts of the arena, which is not likely.


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DC ­ Fan
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Sep 14, 2014 13:07 |  #7

Bogino wrote in post #17153660 (external link)
Was shooting these riding shots in TV mode (Canon 60D). Indoor arena and setting was at 1/320 and ISO of 2000 and 2500. Is TV still the best option for this type of event or should I be using a different Mode? I'll be shooting again today during part 2 of the event. Thank You.

Everything depends on light and equipment.

For indoor available light photography a f/2.8 lens is a better choice. Demonstrated:

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Camera Maker: Canon
Camera Model: Canon EOS REBEL T2i
Lens: 70-200mm
Image Date: 2012-06-01 10:55:02 (no TZ)
Focal Length: 144.0mm
Aperture: f/2.8
Exposure Time: 0.0031 s (1/320)
ISO equiv: 6400
Exposure Bias: +0.33 EV
Metering Mode: Matrix
Exposure: shutter priority (semi-auto)
White Balance: Auto
Flash Fired: No (enforced)
Orientation: Normal
Color Space: sRGB


Regardless of lens, you will find that a very high ISO will be needed for a useful exposure in indoor arena light.

High ISO noise can be controlled with noise reduction (external link) software. The most accurate exposure settinga can be avchieved with the use of a light meter to get a incident reading (external link) in the same light where the show is being held.



  
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Sep 14, 2014 13:16 |  #8

Remember you can deal with noise in editing - and much of the noise in a shot vanishes when properly resized for net display or when printed. Motion blur from a too slow shutter speed you can't solve - its there and you can't remove it.*

*ok in theory you can but you are either looking at:

a) Being exceptionally lucky that there is an area to clone the sharp detail from to copy it over in the shot

b) Ages (hours) of digital painting to restore the soft area - at which point you might as well just be a painter not a photographer.

So to all practical intents its impossible to fix.


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digital ­ paradise
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Sep 14, 2014 15:42 |  #9

You will have a tough time keeping your ISO down while maintaining a fast enough shutter speed at f f8 to 11. You will have to give in to one or the other.

12,800. 7D with a 300 f4 set at f4. Shutter was about 1/420 to 500 and I was maxed out. Still had some motion blur in the feet and hands. Leaned that day why everyone used to talk about fast lenses. What I would have given for one more stop LOL. I have a 2.8 tele zoom now.

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Sep 14, 2014 18:14 |  #10

OP there is another reason (apart from letting in extra light) why you should use a wider aperture (f/2.8-f/4). That is to reduce depth of field and separate your subject from the background. Compare your shots to those posted by Digital Paradise and DC Fan and you will see that the blurred background is less distracting. You would really only want the background in focus if you were trying to capture a specific background detail, such as a sponsors logo.


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Sep 15, 2014 06:21 |  #11

Dan Marchant wrote in post #17154240 (external link)
OP there is another reason (apart from letting in extra light) why you should use a wider aperture (f/2.8-f/4). That is to reduce depth of field and separate your subject from the background. Compare your shots to those posted by Digital Paradise and DC Fan and you will see that the blurred background is less distracting. You would really only want the background in focus if you were trying to capture a specific background detail, such as a sponsors logo.

This advice would be OK for the OP's first shot, but not the second. Using a narrow DoF (f2.8) on the second shot would mean getting the horse's head or the rider in focus - but not both.


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ejenner
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Sep 15, 2014 12:37 as a reply to  @ hollis_f's post |  #12

This is why I never use Tv - I always want control over aperture.

Also looks like the OP could have exposed to the right a bit more with an ISO of 3200 instead, even if he wanted to use f8.


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Too Much ISO? Equestrian Event
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