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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 25 Sep 2014 (Thursday) 17:02
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Very First Impressions of the 6D

 
DuncRS
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Sep 27, 2014 16:12 |  #16

My very limited knowledge but I will give it a go
In raw you can do so much more to the pic than you can in JPEG only problem with raw are the file size as they are huge, but I have my 6d now set to raw and trying to get to grips with it all
As for ddp4 its ok for a free one as I also have it and used it before I got my free Lightroom 5 and must say Lightroom 5 is great and quite easy to work with and has more features
Sure someone will come along and go into much more detail for you but give raw a go and have a play in ddp4 and see how you get on and if you like it then you will find Lightroom 5 even better to get on with




  
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skifastbadly
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Sep 27, 2014 16:15 |  #17

SHIF.ski wrote in post #17180789 (external link)
Here is a great web-based user guide for this camera:

http://kenrockwell.com …/6d/users-guide/index.htm (external link)

Stick to Ken's suggestions until you get the hang of it.

Cheers,
-S

Thanks. Very helpful.

I note you're located on the Wasatch Back...I lived in Park City for 9 years, hence my handle......


Canon AE1 Canon Elan IIe Canon Elan 7e
Canon 6D
Canon 28-70L (non IS)
Canon 70-200L (non IS)

  
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kjonnnn
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Sep 27, 2014 17:47 |  #18

I went from ae-1 to canon 10s then to digital. If youre jumping from an Elan to a 6D, was it unexpected youve missed ALOT in between?




  
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skifastbadly
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Sep 27, 2014 18:32 |  #19

kjonnnn wrote in post #17180914 (external link)
I went from ae-1 to canon 10s then to digital. If youre jumping from an Elan to a 6D, was it unexpected youve missed ALOT in between?

Not at all. It was fully expected. That's why I'm asking questions here and reading books and watching videos on YouTube.

So far, so good.


Canon AE1 Canon Elan IIe Canon Elan 7e
Canon 6D
Canon 28-70L (non IS)
Canon 70-200L (non IS)

  
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kjonnnn
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Sep 27, 2014 23:15 |  #20

skifastbadly wrote in post #17180974 (external link)
Not at all. It was fully expected. That's why I'm asking questions here and reading books and watching videos on YouTube.

So far, so good.

Great. the best thang of jumping from film to digital is you can experiment to your heart's delight with NO film expenses. lol




  
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Krichton
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Sep 28, 2014 03:03 |  #21

ECF is gone due to a marketing issue. Perhaps no one cares about using their eyeball to control the focus point.




  
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rrblint
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Sep 28, 2014 08:43 |  #22

Krichton wrote in post #17181492 (external link)
ECF is gone due to a marketing issue. Perhaps no one cares about using their eyeball to control the focus point.

Can you give me a source on that?


Mark

  
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rgs
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Sep 28, 2014 16:56 |  #23

skifastbadly wrote in post #17180729 (external link)
Thanks all. Two more quick questions: Until I get this thing down and really start to get serious about the processing, is there any advantage to shooting RAW over JPG? And, since I was provided with a copy of Digital Photo Professional 4.0, how much better is the $140 Lightroom?

Yes there are several advantages to RAW over JPEG.


  1. Backward compatibility. If you shoot JPEG now you will regret it after you learn to use RAW. You will have lots of images, some very good ones, from which you cannot extract the best print because you only have JPEG to work with.
  2. RAW has the kind of flexibility you are familiar with from color neg film. JPEG is like the chrome strait jacket.
  3. Your DPP install will do a good, basic job of converting RAW right out of the box. You don't have to wait until you have developed significant RAW skills.
  4. If you keep your RAW files, you can always go back to the beginning and try again - like a negative.
Now, as to LightRoom, the big advantage is the ease with which you can do non-destructuve editing. Initially the way LR handles files can seem less than intuitive but, once you get it, you will understand that with LR you never have to touch your camera original. Your "negatives" are secure as they are with film. All your edits are "soft-saved" in LR's database without changing the original RAW. When you "export" (the LR equivalent of "save"), you save a copy - your original is again untouched. You can make DPP do all this but you will have to give it some thought and it requires some extra steps, LR does it by design.

LR also make really good photographic sense after you learn it. And you'll be surprised at how precise some of the controls are - especially compared to what is available in a darkroom. It can be a a precise tool after you begin to understand it. Worth every penny (and I don't even like Adobe).

The biggest challenge with a printer is getting a color balanced work flow. I would not be too concerned with that until the camera and LR are pretty well learned. First photo printer, if it's still being made, get a Canon ip4920. Prints very nice photos and is also a good office printer. Only has 5 carts (CMYK and pigment black for text). It's also a good general purpose printer. I now use a Canon PRO100 but the little ip4920 is a good start. The PRO 100 might also be a good start for you and they're not very expensive. I have never liked HP for photos.

Hope this helps. It's a long but pleasant journey you beginning. I came to digital a bit late after years of using 4x5 and 6x7 film. For color, digital is a dream. For B&W, I much prefer film. Digital B&W almost offends me.

Canon 7d MkII, Canon 50D, Pentax 67, Canon 30D, Baker Custom 4x5, Canon EF 24-104mm f4, Canon EF 100mm f2.8 Macro, Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5, 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di VC

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watt100
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Sep 29, 2014 05:44 |  #24

SHIF.ski wrote in post #17180789 (external link)
Stick to Ken's suggestions until you get the hang of it.

Cheers,
-S

impossible to kill kenny (and his bad advice)




  
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Gobeatty
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Sep 29, 2014 08:35 |  #25

I had and am still having a similar experience to the OP. I'm an old film shooter and and the cameras were so much simpler, even the pro cameras.

I'm two-three years with digital now (we has point and shoots but we never took them seriously) and I originally chose Fuji due to the traditional appearance and controls of the camera. I basically wanted my FE-2 with digital film and call it a day. Didn't work out so well and I'm enjoying the 6D and recently acquired Olympus EM-10.

For me, one goal with digital is to get the complication out of the way of the shooting experience. If I'm stuck on menu diving to adjust the camera, I'm dead as a living breathing photographer.

Some keys to this for me have been:

1-Many menu settings are set once and forget. You may later decide on a different preference, but they are not settings you would be changing while out shooting.

2-Getting used to input dials in place of shutter speed dial and aperture ring. These are configurable regarding what dial does what and which direction they go so I set mine to feel most like my old Nikons.

3-Adjustable ISO. Now, this is different from film but is so worth learning. Imagine your film camera but you can change from iso 100 to iso 1600 at a snap. And ISO can be set to auto to allow the camera to change it. At first, to reproduce more closely film shooting, I would always set ISO manually - just like choosing my film. I'm using auto ISO more these days especially since higher ISO on the 6D is so clean. I am stingier with it on the Olympus but it's fine up to 3200.

4-If you don't want to fool with RAW processing, then consider Ken Rockwell's suggested settings for People and Things. I have them set to C1 and C2 on the mode dial and they work just fine. Putting them on the dial means I can just look down (no menu :-)) and know if I'm shooting normal or vivid. I can crop and edit the JPEGS on my iPad and this works for me.

5-The Q button is your friend quick white balance and bracketing can be set here.

6-MyMenu is your friend. I put things like card formatting and adjusting back screen brightness there. Manual WB is there too.

7-Consider RAW. It can offload from your mind while shooting all of the JPEG settings - white balance, saturation, contrast, noise reduction, sharpening, etc since you decide all of these later. Again though, thus is where Ken's settings, at least as a starting point, can be helpful if you are shooting JPEG. Note with digital you don't need to bother with white balance filters like we did in the film days. Some photographers still use these rather than do it digitally, but I'd rather not bother and lose light to the filter in the process.

I'm at a point now where shooting feels a lot like the old days but I still may get a split image screen for my 6D. I miss old skool manual focusing.


6D | 35 f2 | 50 1.8 | 85 1.8 | 28 - 135 f3.5 - 5.6 | 70-210 f4

  
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InfiniteDivide
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Oct 01, 2014 01:14 |  #26

Congratz on the 6D. Check out youtube videos for everything you want to learn, and follow along.

If you like manual focusing I highly recommend the EG-S screen for your viewfinder.
Best upgrade you can do for thin dof and fast primes.

For prints, try Snapfish, they often send out great promo email deals on prints.
Just signup for free, upload your photos, wait for a good deal, and print them all at once.


James Patrus
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For Sale:Canon 16-35mm f4 IS l Do you enjoy Super Famicom games? (external link) PM me directly.

  
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chungdynasty
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Oct 01, 2014 16:36 |  #27

skifastbadly wrote in post #17180729 (external link)
DuncRS: I got no 'free stuff' I bought from Amazon. I do have a $200 rebate coming, maybe that's why.
jabtas: Thanks for that, I'll have to figure that one out. I have lots of time.
Stevewf1: I thought about that. No matter how crappy the printer is at the local Walgreens, it's gotta be better than my HP "Photosmart" which should be called "Photocrap" because even with the photo paper the output is junk. Yes, it is my first foray into serious digital. But I've been shooting film for 30 years so I wanted something that 1) had full format and 2) would use my L lenses (which relates back to 1).

Thanks all. Two more quick questions: Until I get this thing down and really start to get serious about the processing, is there any advantage to shooting RAW over JPG? And, since I was provided with a copy of Digital Photo Professional 4.0, how much better is the $140 Lightroom?

raw pictures give you lots more freedom to edit and colour grade the photo but the files are a lot bigger and its very time consuming to convert them into files you can send to people or just to upload on the internet. The software canon came with is fine if you're new to all this, once you get better you can change to lightroom but make sure to get a decent SD card especially if you want the option to shoot video something like a Lexar 400x or 600x they're not too expensive but they can handle pretty much whatever you do with that camera.

Also make sure to check out the wifi thats built in. You can send photos directly to your phone or use your smart phone as a shutter or adjust things like iso, shutter speed and aperture right from the phone and even frame a shot with the phone.




  
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convergent
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Oct 02, 2014 03:26 |  #28

Congrats on the purchase. I think you will learn the camera much quicker than processing. With film, the lab did all the processing. With digital, it's all you! I highly recommend Lightroom, and invest in learning it. I went to some Ed Pierce seminar early on and bought some of his DVDs that got me started. There are many good learning tools and videos for Lightroom. That will be the area that will greatly impact your images, since the photography part you already know.


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stevewf1
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Oct 02, 2014 03:32 |  #29

You don't have to shoot RAW right now. It isn't like JPEGs are all going to be a worthless waste of time. If a JPEG comes out looking pretty darn good, I'm not sure there's a whole lot more where RAW will help - or if it would be worth the effort.

Actually, to start, I'd just shoot JPEG until you get the hang of using the camera and look at your shots using something like Irfanview. You'll be more able to quickly see where you're going wrong, or right. You're not going to be able to truly judge your photos by looking at them on the LCD screen.


Steve

  
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texaskev
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Oct 02, 2014 03:37 |  #30

skifastbadly wrote in post #17180729 (external link)
DuncRS:

Thanks all. Two more quick questions: Until I get this thing down and really start to get serious about the processing, is there any advantage to shooting RAW over JPG? And, since I was provided with a copy of Digital Photo Professional 4.0, how much better is the $140 Lightroom?

Shooting RAW is a huge advantage over JPG. The amount of latitude in exposure adjustment and other adjustments is huge over JPG.

I'd say that Lightroom is a much more versatile tool for post processing when compared to DPP 4.0.

Just my .02


Canon 1DX II, 1DX, 11-24 F4 L, 100 F2.8 L, 16-35 F2.8 L II, 17-40 F4 L, 24-70 F2.8 L II, 24-105 F4 L II, 70-200 F2.8 L II

  
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