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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 20 Sep 2014 (Saturday) 11:27
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Thinking of selling my 100-400 and getting the Tam 150-600

 
Snydremark
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Sep 28, 2014 10:18 |  #76

pknight wrote in post #17181605 (external link)
...

"Even" pknight? Not sure what that means, but this is good advice nonetheless. My decision was to sell the 100-400, since the shortcomings of the Tamron were easy to correct to my satisfaction, while pulling on the front element of the Canon did nothing to extend its focal length.

That was pretty much all that meant; I think the OP ought to try both before getting rid of one since the performance and satisfaction with each one is going to vary from photographer to photographer.


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
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Tom ­ Reichner
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Sep 28, 2014 10:26 |  #77

Sibil wrote in post #17181664 (external link)
Who?

Refer to the link I provided in post # 15 of this thread.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
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rndman
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Sep 28, 2014 10:37 |  #78

I did the same. Sold my 100-400 in March. Put-in my pre-order(s) for Tamron.
I got it around June/July..
And I am happy with my decision..


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davebreal
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Sep 28, 2014 23:55 |  #79

Scrumhalf wrote in post #17167764 (external link)
I'm with Tom. EJ Peikers' word is gold in my book.

What would Dave Blinder's word be worth?

Tamron SP 150-600mm VC

500mm focal length, 1/500 F/9.0 ISO 200. Canon 7D.

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davebreal
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Sep 28, 2014 23:57 |  #80

If a person needs to rely on a teleconverter to reach past 600mm, I'd spend the money on a class on wildlife tracking and behavior instead.


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Limbwalker
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Sep 30, 2014 10:06 |  #81

My personal experience with now two 100-400L lenses vs. my newly acquired 150-600 Tammy ...

One of the 100-400's I tried was very poor while the other was razor sharp. I'd put the 150-600 real, real close to the sharper of the two 100-400's I've shot. As in, I can't tell the difference.

I was shopping for a good used 100-400 yesterday when I came across a 150-600 in the store. I figured it was fate, so I bought it and later took it to the zoo to try it out.

I'm very pleased with the results. I am no longer shopping for a 100-400.


Shoot first and ask questions later.

  
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Philihase
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Sep 30, 2014 15:51 |  #82

davebreal wrote in post #17183151 (external link)
If a person needs to rely on a teleconverter to reach past 600mm, I'd spend the money on a class on wildlife tracking and behavior instead.


http://en.wikipedia.or​g/wiki/Goldcrest (external link)


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Tanglefoot47
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Sep 30, 2014 16:59 |  #83

MalVeauX wrote in post #17181591 (external link)
Heya,

It depends on what you're shooting and what you want to do with the image at the end of the day (print or not). To me, not crazy. But then again, I went with the Tamron for the 600mm. Because I only basically shoot it at 600mm. Why else get that length right? I too shoot wildlife with that lens pretty much exclusively.

The Canon 400 is going to focus a little faster, so if you combine the new 7D2 with the Canon 400, you get higher ISO performance and the robust autofocus of the 7D2, and the speed of focus from the 400. That means you can do more action wildlife, like the beginnings of birds in flight. But, reach limited. I find you still have to be pretty close to get decent frame fillers. Otherwise, you're always heavy cropping even at 400mm on APS-C. So if you want to focus on action, the 400 is probably worth keeping.

The 600 is optically as good, frankly in my book. But that's just my experience. 600mm F8 on the Tamron is a staple for me. People forget it's a $1k lens, not a $6k lens. They try to say it's bad, but they're not putting it in context. It's 600mm that is quite decently for only $1k. But it doesn't focus as fast. It's fast, but it's not lightning like the Canon whites can be. That extra 200mm does make a difference though. Significantly. So if you do a lot of wildlife that isn't super fast (like not shooting King Fishers in flight), then you probably will enjoy the 600mm with its VC more. More pixels on target. The nice ISO performance on the 7D2 will just help you keep shutter speeds high, which is very useful at 600mm + APS-C factor. I try to keep my shutter over 1/1000s frankly when I shoot mine. Even for still wildlife.

So two tools for two jobs.

I shoot my 600 on APS-C for most wildlife. I keep a 200 F2.8 on my other APS-C for the action wildlife at closer range.

Optical quality aside, these were off the hip as I was trying to get the images before some stupid tourists were walking up on the bird, here's 400mm vs 600mm in terms of real world difference in terms of pixels on target, from the same location, probably 80~100 feet away from this blue heron:

QUOTED IMAGE
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/nUm5​9S  (external link) IMG_6338 (external link) by Mwise1023 (external link), on Flickr

QUOTED IMAGE
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/obLz​x9  (external link) IMG_6343 (external link) by Mwise1023 (external link), on Flickr

This is still not a frame filler, even at 600mm and APS-C. Still takes a lot of reach to fill a frame. So I totally know what you mean by never having enough reach.

I use my 600mm with a 2.0x TC sometimes (live view focuses fine). For 1200mm. This is what I do with that:

QUOTED IMAGE
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/padB​gm  (external link) IMG_0666 (external link) by Mwise1023 (external link), on Flickr

Obviously not as optically good with the TC, pretty soft. But my point is the reach in terms of figuring out if you want more reach or not. 1200mm lets you really get close from far away. It costs you though.

I just don't have the budget for $3k~6k lenses. So this is from the point of view of being ok with a lesser lens, in the $1k ballpark.

I find cropping a 400mm shot is not as good as a straight up 600mm shot, as pixels on target matter. This is why I ended up on the Tamron, and didn't stay with the Canon 400's. But I also do not really shoot "action" wildlife.

Food for thought.

Very best,

Very good points and where I live I see a lot of eagles but 75% of the time they are very long shots




  
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Thinking of selling my 100-400 and getting the Tam 150-600
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