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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Macro Talk 
Thread started 24 Sep 2014 (Wednesday) 12:23
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shortest macro lens

 
Archibald
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Sep 25, 2014 00:05 |  #16

LV Moose wrote in post #17175730 (external link)
Well if achieving a flat field of focus has nothing to do with the curvature of the elements, they've found a different way to bend light.

Magnetism maybe?

The flatness of field and all other optical properties depend on the optical design of the lens. The optical design includes the curvature of all the elements and their spacing. But the curvature of the front element tells you nothing about how flat the field of a complex camera lens is. (It might be different if it is a simple single-element lens, but I don't think any camera lens uses such a simple design.)


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LV ­ Moose
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Sep 25, 2014 00:36 |  #17

Archibald wrote in post #17176281 (external link)
Magnetism maybe?

Not in prosumer lenses, which is what we're talking about.

Archibald wrote in post #17176281 (external link)
The flatness of field and all other optical properties depend on the optical design of the lens. The optical design includes the curvature of all the elements and their spacing. But the curvature of the front element tells you nothing about how flat the field of a complex camera lens is.

I wasn't talking about just the front element; I always used the plural.

Anyway, I think we've strayed just a little from the topic. ;)

I'm done.


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Sep 25, 2014 00:49 |  #18

Just to add some more info- shortest focal length macro lens I've seen is the Tokina AF 35mm f/2.8 AT-X Pro DX.
Regarding DOF- whilst it is technically true that DOF is the same for macro lenses of varying focal lengths at the same mag and aperture, The OOF elements are more recognisable in short focal length lenses and so give the impression of greater DOF. The converse is also true- you get dreamy bokeh with long focal length macro lenses.
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Sep 25, 2014 06:58 |  #19

LV Moose wrote in post #17176315 (external link)
I wasn't talking about just the front element; I always used the plural.

Anyway, I think we've strayed just a little from the topic. ;)

I'm done.

Ouch. Neither did I. In fact what I meant to say was "the curvature produced by the elements" I wasn't talking about the physical shape of the glass I don't know (or really care) how it's done.


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Sibil
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Sep 25, 2014 08:29 as a reply to  @ LordV's post |  #20

Thanks for all the replies and feedback.




  
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Sep 25, 2014 09:56 |  #21

Sorry, guys, the front element part came from the link that was supplied.


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Sep 25, 2014 13:02 |  #22

LordV wrote in post #17176327 (external link)
Just to add some more info- shortest focal length macro lens I've seen is the Tokina AF 35mm f/2.8 AT-X Pro DX.

Brian, I did some reading on this lens and it seems to be a unique macro lens. I couldn't find out if it is just for the crop sensors, or if it would work with a full frame camera. Do you know?




  
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Sep 26, 2014 05:47 |  #23

LordV wrote in post #17176327 (external link)
Just to add some more info- shortest focal length macro lens I've seen is the Tokina AF 35mm f/2.8 AT-X Pro DX.
Regarding DOF- whilst it is technically true that DOF is the same for macro lenses of varying focal lengths at the same mag and aperture, The OOF elements are more recognisable in short focal length lenses and so give the impression of greater DOF. The converse is also true- you get dreamy bokeh with long focal length macro lenses.
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Sep 26, 2014 10:43 |  #24

Sibil wrote in post #17175283 (external link)
For better DOF, unless I am misguided. And, smaller work envelope on the table.

Have you considered the TS-E90 with a couple of extension tubes? The short native MFD means that it'll get you in the 'macro window' and, whilst not increasing DoF, will allow you to put the plane of focus where you want it which is often what you need.
At MFD it'll give just over .4x with a 12mm tube, .6x with 25mm and 75x with 37mm. 50mm does get you just a tad off 1:1 but the span of available focus (MFD-inf) is just a little too tight to be practical in most aspects.

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Sep 26, 2014 13:15 as a reply to  @ Canon Bob's post |  #25

^^^^
Thanks. Something to think about.




  
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Sep 26, 2014 13:41 |  #26

Sibil wrote in post #17177237 (external link)
Brian, I did some reading on this lens and it seems to be a unique macro lens. I couldn't find out if it is just for the crop sensors, or if it would work with a full frame camera. Do you know?

It's made for crop sensor only, but like nearly all 3rd party lenses it uses the EF mount not the EFS so it will fit to fullframe bodies. Far as I recall it can actually do a good covering of a fullframe sensor as well; far better than most would expect. I think its also pretty safe on most (other than mount type, many EFS lenses can have recessed elements that hit the mirror when it flips up) fullframe bodies; but be careful/test it out/research that element yourself.

It's a very neat little lens and I do like it a lot. For close-up work and general shooting its a neat little lens, however its got some fallbacks.

1) It's AF is macro style - its a little noisy and slower than ideal. Very usable, but not lightning fast nor quiet; its also not HSM/USM so you can't use the focus wheel without setting it to manual (and its got an odd system for that - there is no switch, instead you push the focus ring forward to lock it into AF or pull it back for manual).

2) It's aperture is only f2.8 - now that is good but most 35mm are getting into f1.4 territory or wider - can be a light gathering limitation in comparison to regular 35mm lenses.

3) It's working distance at 1:1 is impractical. You're so close that you will be overshadowing the subject with yourself, camera and lens - which makes lighting a tricky aspect (workable if you've the right gear, but not ideal).


Personally I love it for being a little macro lens for the macro addict and doing good close-up work. I can throw it on and indoors or outdoors don't have to worry about being too close to anything. It will do macro in a pinch too if I get close and position my flash right.


For this kind of work that hte OP proposes though I wouldn't use it.
In fact for things that don't actually require macro magnifications a regular telephoto lens can often be superior because you shoot from further away which helps increase depth of field; without having to resort to focus stacking. IF you've limited space though I'd say look to at least 60mm or longer macro lenses - its a more workable distance to use and gives you more ability to easily setup good lighting for the subject.


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Sep 29, 2014 17:20 as a reply to  @ Overread's post |  #27

^^^^^
Thanks for sharing your experience with the lens, and the suggestions.




  
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Archibald
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Sep 29, 2014 18:14 |  #28

Overread wrote in post #17179112 (external link)
In fact for things that don't actually require macro magnifications a regular telephoto lens can often be superior because you shoot from further away which helps increase depth of field

So you want to use a tele to increase DOF ... and the OP wants to use a wide angle to increase DOF ...


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Japers
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Oct 06, 2014 19:53 |  #29

Sony makes a Sony 30mm macro lens. My wife had one for her Alpha camera.


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shortest macro lens
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