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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Critique Corner 
Thread started 25 Oct 2014 (Saturday) 20:37
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I need some help

 
jlstan
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Oct 28, 2014 16:21 |  #16

Christopher Steven b wrote in post #17238159 (external link)
I'd also work on ensuring that your subjects look like they have their eyes open. 3/4 of your subjects here are squinty. 2/4 look to me like their eyes are closed. Did you check your shots on scene to make sure all was well ?

This shot was one of the shots when they were goofing around a bit(the kids) the sun was also not in my favor. I am quite new to portrait and still have a lot to learn. I have no studio and do all my shooting outdoors so at times I have to use what mother nature has offered.

All the comments help me learn. Thanks for that.




  
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jlstan
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Oct 28, 2014 16:31 |  #17

riveragaryj@juno.com wrote in post #17238216 (external link)
Looks like their Christmas card is done......

Can you explain...I don't understand your reason for this comment




  
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jlstan
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Oct 28, 2014 16:37 as a reply to  @ jlstan's post |  #18

They were wanting a JD theme so as long as the comments are flowing give me some more on this shot


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CanonVsNikon
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Oct 28, 2014 17:03 |  #19
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Like I said, watch your backgrounds. The tractor is distracting. If you wanted the tractor to be included than make it more prominent in the scene. Otherwise leave it out




  
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jlstan
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Oct 28, 2014 17:44 |  #20

CanonVsNikon wrote in post #17238299 (external link)
Like I said, watch your backgrounds. The tractor is distracting. If you wanted the tractor to be included than make it more prominent in the scene. Otherwise leave it out

Yes I wanted it in the scene...so your saying bring it closer to the subject or increase depth of field?




  
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skidzam
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Oct 28, 2014 18:40 |  #21

Every time I take a shot, I ask myself, "Where is the light?" My goal is to put the greatest amount of light on the my subject, not a supporting element. Because the tractor is so bright and distracting, my eye is immediately drawn to it, not the family.




  
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jlstan
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Oct 28, 2014 18:49 |  #22

skidzam wrote in post #17238486 (external link)
Every time I take a shot, I ask myself, "Where is the light?" My goal is to put the greatest amount of light on the my subject, not a supporting element. Because the tractor is so bright and distracting, my eye is immediately drawn to it, not the family.

I ask myself that same question when I shoot. The problem I was having is I did not want to shoot into the sun and when the sun was at my back the family was squinting which is the reason for me moving them further from the tractor into the shade and using fill light. I should have killed some of the ambient light and relied more on the fill light or waited for more of an overcast day. When it is bright out how do you overcome squinting during a portrait shot?




  
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skidzam
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Oct 28, 2014 19:16 |  #23

"When it is bright out how do you overcome squinting during a portrait shot?"

Since I'm not a pro, I never take portraits at this time. I wait for less harsh light. I also don't use front light because it's too flat. I use side light so squinting is not an issue.

If you want to use front light, and this wouldn't be easy to do with children, first pose your subjects and ask them to turn their only heads away from the light. Set your camera factors and take a couple of test shots to make sure everything is as you want it. A fast shutter speed is essential. Then tell your subjects to smile and at the count of three, turn towards you...snap. If you're fast enough, you can capture the shot before they squint. It'll work with adults, but I don't know about kids.




  
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jlstan
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Oct 28, 2014 19:30 as a reply to  @ skidzam's post |  #24

The hard part for me is setting a time with a person to meet a week in advance just to arrive on that day to harsh light which was not in the forecast.




  
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skidzam
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Oct 28, 2014 19:42 |  #25

"The hard part for me is setting a time with a person to meet a week in advance just to arrive on that day to harsh light which was not in the forecast."

I know, that's what separates the pro from the hobbyist. I can choose a time, a pro can't.

The only other thing you could have done is to set your exposure for the tractor and use some fill light on them. They would be underexposed, but you could lighten them in PS.




  
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bob_r
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Oct 28, 2014 22:52 |  #26

jlstan wrote in post #17238373 (external link)
Yes I wanted it in the scene...so your saying bring it closer to the subject or increase depth of field?

Why? Were you taking a picture of the tractor or the family? I could see using the tractor as a prop with the family on it, but not just as another subject to compete for the viewer's attention.

jlstan wrote in post #17238509 (external link)
I ask myself that same question when I shoot. The problem I was having is I did not want to shoot into the sun and when the sun was at my back the family was squinting which is the reason for me moving them further from the tractor into the shade and using fill light. I should have killed some of the ambient light and relied more on the fill light or waited for more of an overcast day. When it is bright out how do you overcome squinting during a portrait shot?

You are correct to have the sun at your subjects' backs or move them into the shade. You don't want your subjects staring into the sun.
In your last image, it looks like the sun was still hitting the boy's face and the top of the girl's head. You don't want them in dappled shade, you want them in solid shade.

I think the second image is still much better than the first one.


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dballphotography
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Oct 29, 2014 04:53 |  #27

The second image is much better than the first, if the sun is bright as bob_r says you want the sun behind or to the side, ideally look for a shady spot where the light is softer. That tractor was a no no... really doesn't need to be in the scene. When doing outside portraits I would usually spot meter for the subjects, make sure they are exposed well.


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