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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos The Business of Photography 
Thread started 03 Dec 2014 (Wednesday) 20:43
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POLL: "Is a too large flash drive (i.e., 4GB drive when you're only delivering 20 photos) a problem?"
Yes
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No
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USB Drive Sizes - Is too big a problem?

 
JacobAllison
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Dec 03, 2014 20:43 |  #1

I'm looking to start offering USB drives instead of printed CD's to my customers when delivering their photos.

My only concern is that all of these drives start, at the smallest, at 1gb, and most are 2 or 4 gb!

I think that if I deliver a customer with 20 photos, about 250MB (With some of the extra content I put on), which only takes up 1/4 of the drive or worse, their reaction is going to be that they didn't get their monies worth out of it.

What's your opinion? Am I overthinking this?

If it is a marketing problem, do you think adding a hidden file to take up extra space is better than getting smaller drives? (Not that I've found anyone selling small drives!)

What do you deliver your finished photos in?


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sandpiper
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Post edited over 4 years ago by sandpiper.
     
Dec 03, 2014 21:13 |  #2

How do you describe your packages?

The normal way of managing client expectations is to tell them in advance what they will be getting for their money. So, if you describe a package as consisting of a 1 hour shoot and 20 images supplied on a USB stick, why would they feel that they aren't getting their moneys worth, when you supply 20 images, even if there is still 2-4 Gb unused on the stick. I presume you do packages which offer more images, so it isn't surprising that you carry USB sticks large enough for those jobs as well.

I don't see how a customer would feel short changed unless you originally stated more images would be provided than you eventually supplied.

If you want to be certain, promise 15 images and deliver 20, then they will feel that they have received a bonus and extra free images.




  
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JacobAllison
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Post edited over 4 years ago by JacobAllison.
     
Dec 03, 2014 21:31 |  #3

sandpiper wrote in post #17310032 (external link)
How do you describe your packages?

The normal way of managing client expectations is to tell them in advance what they will be getting for their money. So, if you describe a package as consisting of a 1 hour shoot and 20 images supplied on a USB stick, why would they feel that they aren't getting their moneys worth, when you supply 20 images, even if there is still 2-4 Gb unused on the stick. I presume you do packages which offer more images, so it isn't surprising that you carry USB sticks large enough for those jobs as well.

Yup, this is exactly my model. 1 hours shoot + 20 finished digital images.

If you want to be certain, promise 15 images and deliver 20, then they will feel that they have received a bonus and extra free images.

This is a great idea! I do try to do some 'extra' work on whichever photo I think is the best, or send it to my digital artist to get some artistic work done.


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gonzogolf
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Dec 03, 2014 21:42 |  #4

I agree with Sandpiper sbout delivering more than you promise but disagree sbout lowering the client's expectations In order to exceed them. If you sre shooting 200 snd delivering 20, they are slready wondering where the other 90 perent of the imsges are going. Stick with promising 20 snd giving them a few extra. That way you don't open the door to the "I want to see the rest of them conversation:




  
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bubbygator
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Dec 03, 2014 21:44 |  #5

For my amateur sharing of jpg's with family/friends, I use Microsoft OneDrive. I upload the pics to a public folder (that others can access only if they have the right link), then I "share" it with myself. OneDrive sends me an email linking to that folder. I then forward that email to whoever I want to have access. They can view or download the pics. After about a month, I delete the folder - if anyone didn't do the download, they have to contact me to get it put back up.

I'm not saying this would be good for business, but it sure solved the "usb problem" for me.


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thegunner
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Dec 03, 2014 21:45 |  #6

if anything, i'd think of it as getting a free USB drive :p




  
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JacobAllison
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Dec 03, 2014 21:58 |  #7

gonzogolf wrote in post #17310114 (external link)
I agree with Sandpiper sbout delivering more than you promise but disagree sbout lowering the client's expectations In order to exceed them. If you sre shooting 200 snd delivering 20, they are slready wondering where the other 90 perent of the imsges are going. Stick with promising 20 snd giving them a few extra. That way you don't open the door to the "I want to see the rest of them conversation:

I've already published my 2015 pricing guide, so I don't want to change it now. =) But, I meant offering 20 (which is in my pricing guide) but including one or two extra if I like them well enough.

Sometimes even getting 20 unique photos for a customer can be a challenge in a one-hour shoot, though!

bubbygator wrote:
For my amateur sharing of jpg's with family/friends, I use Microsoft OneDrive. I upload the pics to a public folder (that others can access only if they have the right link), then I "share" it with myself. OneDrive sends me an email linking to that folder. I then forward that email to whoever I want to have access. They can view or download the pics. After about a month, I delete the folder - if anyone didn't do the download, they have to contact me to get it put back up.

I'm not saying this would be good for business, but it sure solved the "usb problem" for me.

I do also offer an online gallery for customers - actually, it's they way they order prints. I use shootproof along with ProDPI, when they come to pick up the CD with photos, in the folder is also a thank you letter, some business cards, a coupon, and a card with a link to their personal web gallery. They can then use that to order additional prints, all I have to do is approve the order and make sure everything is A-ok, and they get them in the mail 2-3 weeks later with no further input from me.


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MattPharmD
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Dec 04, 2014 08:23 |  #8

I agree with it seeming like getting a new drive. If you can get a good deal on bigger drives, that would actually be a good deal. Get them personalized with your company (or name) and it will seem like a cool gift.


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koolcreation
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Dec 04, 2014 10:16 |  #9

I recently delivered some photos on a thumb drive. I ordered some 2gb customized ones the company I used upgraded to 4gb ones. Which I did not mind at all. The photos filled up less than half of the drive, they really didn't feel any type of way that the drive wasn't full.


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Christopher ­ Steven ­ b
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Dec 04, 2014 15:43 |  #10

A drive for 20 photos ? Why not just provide a download link to a private gallery containing the photos ? This has the advantage of extra traffic on your site from those clients who may find your gallery system the best way to share their photos. I don't know--it just feels like overkill to provide a usb key for 20 photos.

That said--if you feel like packaging your product like this helps with sales, go for it.

I don't understand why you would fill the usb key up with a hidden file. Are clients paying you for your vision and skill or are they paying you by the megabyte ?



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JacobAllison
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Dec 04, 2014 16:59 |  #11

Thank you for your suggestions!

My thoughts with the 'drive is too big' were coming from an idea of thinking how I feel when I get a big box shipment from somewhere and there's just this little item taped to the inside somewhere. Kind of that, 'really'? feeling.

I don't have any problem with being wrong here.

The reason I'm looking to also give out USB drives in addition to my online galleries is because I'm planning to put together some 'extras'... I'm not sure what these are, but I want them to be things which both get out the name of my studio as well as give the customer the feeling they've got some added value, without costing me much in terms of time. Possibly a slideshow or something.

Also, CD's are out because the local NEX only sells two laptop models that even have CD/DVD drives anymore! The internet on the base here is pretty sketchy too, so I feel it would just be less hassle overall for my customers to get a USB drive that they can plug in and 'bam', there are all their photos in both facebook and full sizes.


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gonzogolf
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Dec 04, 2014 18:15 as a reply to  @ JacobAllison's post |  #12

I just doubt any client is going to say wow a 4 gig drive for half a gig worth of images.




  
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the ­ flying ­ moose
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Dec 04, 2014 19:35 |  #13

Our local mall Santa photographer offers 4gb USB drives for a small cost instead of printing out photos. I've gotten 3 Santa photos on a 4gb drive and didn't think anything of it.




  
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memoriesoftomorrow
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Dec 04, 2014 22:13 as a reply to  @ JacobAllison's post |  #14

Do realise that your product is the actually the data and not the delivery medium?


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Wallace ­ River
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Post edited over 4 years ago by Wallace River.
     
Dec 05, 2014 05:22 |  #15

I use 256 mB USB sticks....the smallest I could find, to save $$. Customers love them. I think if I used 4 gB ones they'd think it a bonus. (excuse the cat hair on my scanner bed ;) )


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USB Drive Sizes - Is too big a problem?
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