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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 12 Dec 2014 (Friday) 01:07
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Ilford Delta 3200 Film 35mm

 
jkdjedi
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Dec 12, 2014 01:07 |  #1

Found the old Pentax SLR in the garage and am now curious about film photography again. I went gung-ho and went for the exotic Delta 3200 blk n Wht film. My question is (I'm sending this to Darkroom.com for developing) can I really shoot at any ISO above 400 or should I just keep it consistent so all my shots are metered at 3200? My Pentax stops at 1600 so I'll be using an Android app to meter the light. (it works, already went through a roll of color 200iso film metered with the app with great results)


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rrblint
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Dec 12, 2014 01:27 |  #2

jkdjedi wrote in post #17327773 (external link)
Found the old Pentax SLR in the garage and am now curious about film photography again. I went gung-ho and went for the exotic Delta 3200 blk n Wht film. My question is (I'm sending this to Darkroom.com for developing) can I really shoot at any ISO above 400 or should I just keep it consistent so all my shots are metered at 3200? My Pentax stops at 1600 so I'll be using an Android app to meter the light. (it works, already went through a roll of color 200iso film metered with the app with great results)

I'm not sure exactly what you are asking but Delta 3200 is a great film. It's actual ISO is about 1000 but with certain developers(esp. Microphen or DD-X) it can be shot up to 12,800 with surprisingly good results. It really shines at 3200 though.


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titi_67207
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Dec 12, 2014 03:17 |  #3

Use it at the same ISO during all the film shots. This could be 800, 1600 or 3200 Iso. Specify to the lab the ISO speed you used. The ISO rating on the box is more a marketing value...

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jkdjedi
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Post edited over 4 years ago by jkdjedi.
     
Dec 12, 2014 09:42 as a reply to  @ titi_67207's post |  #4

Thanks! ^

I'm planning on using film and scanning to digital for Adobe editing. I hear film still can't be beat in the dynamic range department and am curious if scanned digital files from film retain that dynamic range. I'm thinking of jumping into the Darkroom idea with 2 feet but am exploring the scanned to digital option right now.


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Dec 12, 2014 09:49 |  #5

When you shoot fast film they have a much steeper gamma than slower films(this can also be effected by developer, temp and agitation) it is doubtful you will see much of an improvement or the improvement you would get from shooting the zone system with large format film.

When you pushing film you are under exposing and over developing so you are increasing the contrast and wiping out the delicate tones in the middle that are part of a full range image.




  
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TooManyShots
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Dec 12, 2014 09:55 |  #6
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I don't know but I think you should have used a more standard speed film. And to expose at box speed. If the film speed is ISO 400, meter the shot at ISO 400. Also, you have to stick one exposure speed in the entire roll because during development the entire roll would be developed under the same speed. People generally exposed the film 1 stop slower in order to improve the shadow details. Many medium speed films (ASA 400) can be pushed to 800 or even 1600. Frankly, I won't exposed a 3200 speed film at 400. You would probably kill the shadow and mid tone tonality that way. Maybe even leading to overexposure.


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Dec 12, 2014 10:36 |  #7

TooManyShots wrote in post #17328231 (external link)
I don't know but I think you should have used a more standard speed film. And to expose at box speed. If the film speed is ISO 400, meter the shot at ISO 400. Also, you have to stick one exposure speed in the entire roll because during development the entire roll would be developed under the same speed. People generally exposed the film 1 stop slower in order to improve the shadow details. Many medium speed films (ASA 400) can be pushed to 800 or even 1600. Frankly, I won't exposed a 3200 speed film at 400. You would probably kill the shadow and mid tone tonality that way. Maybe even leading to overexposure.

I'll take your advise and shoot the whole roll at the same ISO, maybe 1600, we have a weird thing called clouds and rain here in the desert at the moment so it seems that the stars are lined up for some great photos today! (I find it interesting that for shadow detail with film underexposing helps, thanks for the tip).


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TooManyShots
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Dec 12, 2014 10:46 |  #8
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jkdjedi wrote in post #17328288 (external link)
I'll take your advise and shoot the whole roll at the same ISO, maybe 1600, we have a weird thing called clouds and rain here in the desert at the moment so it seems that the stars are lined up for some great photos today! (I find it interesting that for shadow detail with film underexposing helps, thanks for the tip).


Is not exactly underexposing. Is generally you expose the shadows correctly. In another words, meter the shadows and to apply 2 stops underexposures...in order to correctly render the shadow tonality. The mid tone and highlight should take care of themselves, hopefully. Now, if you meter a mid tone area and underexposing it by 2 stops, you would get too much contrast and maybe losing shadow details entirely.


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airfrogusmc
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Post edited over 4 years ago by airfrogusmc.
     
Dec 12, 2014 10:49 |  #9

Yeah really ya have to shoot the roll at the same ISO for consistent results.

One reason the zone system works so well with sheet film is you control all that because you are shooting and processing one sheet at a time.

If you over expose you push the toe up higher on the film curve and push the shoulder up to high to still get separation in the highlights. Some of that can be controlled through processing but you have still moved the toe up to high depending on how much you over expose. And if you under develop to much you will get real muddy blacks.




  
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jkdjedi
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Dec 12, 2014 10:56 |  #10

TooManyShots wrote in post #17328301 (external link)
Is not exactly underexposing. Is generally you expose the shadows correctly. In another words, meter the shadows and to apply 2 stops underexposures...in order to correctly render the shadow tonality. The mid tone and highlight should take care of themselves, hopefully. Now, if you meter a mid tone area and underexposing it by 2 stops, you would get too much contrast and maybe losing shadow details entirely.

I think I get what your saying, so if I meter the shadow at say f8 then the entire pic as a whole should be shot at f11? unless of course the entire scene was the shadow.. :)


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TooManyShots
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Dec 12, 2014 11:10 as a reply to  @ jkdjedi's post |  #11
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Forgot to mention that since your Pentax does not have spot metering, there is no way you can meter just the shadows. In this case, you have a lot of guess works to do here. The Pentax would only give you an average exposure setting on the over entire scene. If the scene has too much either shadows or the mid tone or highlights, it will obscure your reading. If I were you, I would just meter the ground and to add 1 stop underexposure. In most cases, the ground is more or less at zone 4, unless it is brightly lit with either natural or artificial lighting.


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number ­ six
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Dec 13, 2014 14:24 |  #12

TooManyShots wrote in post #17328339 (external link)
Forgot to mention that since your Pentax does not have spot metering, there is no way you can meter just the shadows.

He didn't say what model Pentax - the ancient Pentax Spotmatic had spot metering only...

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jkdjedi
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Post edited over 4 years ago by jkdjedi.
     
Dec 21, 2014 17:59 as a reply to  @ number six's post |  #13

Sorry guys, out holiday shopping..It's the Pentax ME SUper. I seem to have the worst luck with cameras, I took two frames and the dang shutter/mirror locked on me, unspooled the film to check if anything was wrong with the shutter itself in the back and all seemed okay, found a fix on the net though the day after, slamming the camera on your palm will somehow dislog the stuck whatever on the inside of the camera, it worked. so I have two frames to send to the lab, sigh...

(thinking of sticking to digital after that fiasco)


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Ilford Delta 3200 Film 35mm
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
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