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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing 
Thread started 18 Dec 2014 (Thursday) 13:38
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Squeezing the juice out with lightroom

 
Xerxes
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Location: Calgary, Canada
Post edited over 4 years ago by Xerxes.
     
Dec 18, 2014 13:38 |  #1

It's a little bit subjective, but in lightroom, after you have cropped and fixed composition, how do you go about identifying what changes need to be made based on elements in the photograph?

Using this simple example the elements are
1. The clouds
2. Rock Formations
3. Yellow grass
4. Trees groves
5. The house

How I have chosen to edit it:

IMAGE: https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7578/16025814586_72390a1cba_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/qq9u​m3  (external link) 20140914-IMG_2389 (external link) by czeylanicum (external link), on Flickr

and the Original:
IMAGE: https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7476/15431996993_d017030e8e_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/pvF2​4F  (external link) 20140914-IMG_2389-2 (external link) by czeylanicum (external link), on Flickr

As you can see I've dropped the highlights, increased the exposure, shadows and whites. Used split toning to make the sky more blue and the grass a little more yellow. On the tone curve I increased highlights and lights and decreased shadows and darks slightly. Also did a little bit of luminance sharpening. How would you have done it differently to squeeze the most out? Here is the raw file if anyone wants to try:
Raw file (external link)


What are some good resources for learning how to properly use lightroom to squeeze the juice without 'overcooking'? Two other questions- I edited this on a Benq 3200PT set on sRGB mode with 26% brightness. Is this correct or would it be better to use 'photo' mode? And is sRGB the correct colourspace to export or adobeRGB?



  
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Sdiver2489
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Post edited over 4 years ago by Sdiver2489.
     
Dec 19, 2014 11:24 |  #2

Aaron,

Well first of all let me comment on a few things

1. Focus - With landscapes like this you don't want to focus at infinity usually. That looks like what you did and because of that the first 30 ft of the picture are out of focus. You want to focus right around the hyperfocal distance which you can play with at www.dofmaster.com (external link)

2. You have a really nice lens, don't let your camera run the show for you in auto mode. First of all, this image would probably benefit a bit from a slightly smaller aperture...maybe around F7. Second of all, for some reason your camera was in spot metering for this picture. Perhaps you were trying to use this on the sky to make sure that stayed properly exposed but instead its probably underexposed by a stop or so.

In terms of the editing, its tough to do much with the yellow grass as much of the detail has been lost. The house is pretty small...you could saturate the red roof a bit more if you want to make it more of a focal point. IMHO the rocks are the star of the show here and I would have tried to get closer in on them.

I will sometimes correct for the atmosphere coloring by warming up objects in the distance a bit...your case isn't particularly bad though.

Lastly, its generally not suggested to put a horizon perfectly in the center of the photo. Now, as with all things, there are no real rules to this...however it is just a suggestion to make composition more exciting.

Oh, and sRGB is generally suggested to be what you work in unless you really know what you are doing.


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Canon 5D III, Canon 24-70L F4 IS, Canon 70-300L F4-F5.6 IS, Canon 100mm F2.8L IS Macro, Canon 35mm F2.0 IS, Canon 430EX II-RT, Canon 600EX II-RT

  
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Xerxes
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Dec 25, 2014 19:14 as a reply to  @ Sdiver2489's post |  #3

Thankyou for the response!
I thought infinity was hyperfocal, but I guess that is only at the lower apertures? Part of the reason I went with a large aperture was to achieve a fast shutter speed so that the landscape would be perfectly sharp, but it backfired with the grass.

Yes, my camera was permanently in spot metering for this trip. I think I overestimated the T5Is ability to pull detail out of shadow.
I guess in this case it is more composition that is lacking than lightroom skill.




  
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GeoKras1989
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Dec 26, 2014 01:14 |  #4
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I couldn't get to the raw file. Any tips?


WARNING: I often dispense advice in fields I know little about!

  
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tzalman
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Post edited over 4 years ago by tzalman.
     
Dec 26, 2014 05:53 |  #5

I thought infinity was hyperfocal, but I guess that is only at the lower apertures?

The hyperfocal distance is the distance at which the DoF will stretch from half the hyperfocal distance to infinity. It is, therefore, the focus distance which will produce the biggest DoF possible for that combination of focal length and aperture. If the focus point is less than the HD, the DoF won't reach infinity. If it is more than the HD, the near limit of the DoF will be further away from the camera.

The HD can never be infinity, although it approaches infinity as the aperture is opened.

For a 29 mm lens on 1.6 crop camera and an aperture of f/4.5, the HD is 52.5 feet and gives a DoF from 26.25 feet to infinity.

Part of the reason I went with a large aperture was to achieve a fast shutter speed so that the landscape would be perfectly sharp

Good idea, but 1/2500 was overdoing it. By using 1/320 and ISO 200 you could have used f/11 and had a HD of 21.5 feet (DoF = 11 feet to infinity) and a better exposure.


Elie / אלי

  
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Squeezing the juice out with lightroom
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