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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Food Photography Talk 
Thread started 29 Apr 2014 (Tuesday) 10:27
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Canon DSLR Choice for Professional Food and Product Photography

 
dcooper
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May 16, 2014 09:01 |  #16

timbop wrote in post #16907368 (external link)
Have to say that I don't see FF as being the most important thing. 90TS-E, absolutely. Lighting, absolutely. I don't think the body is as important, but that may just be me. After taking care of the important things, get whatever camera you can afford

Thank you for all of your informative replies.

Thanks Scatterbrained and timbop,
I have a set of Strobe lights, grips, diffusers in my home Studio. I'm pretty knowledgeable when it comes to lighting, I think.

Regarding the 90mm TS-E, I have a few questions please. Do you think a Tilt Shift lens is essential for Product photography or can Focus stacking software and Photoshop Transform do a decent job? I presume that not all kinds of Products need to be photographed with a Tilt shift lens or could it be the only lens I may need to use?
I have done an online course with a Pro recommending the 45mm TS-E, why is the 90mm preferable in your opinions?

Buying some decent glass was my next task alongside the camera choice.

D




  
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breal101
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May 16, 2014 10:38 |  #17

dcooper wrote in post #16908377 (external link)
Thank you for all of your informative replies.

Thanks Scatterbrained and timbop,
I have a set of Strobe lights, grips, diffusers in my home Studio. I'm pretty knowledgeable when it comes to lighting, I think.

Regarding the 90mm TS-E, I have a few questions please. Do you think a Tilt Shift lens is essential for Product photography or can Focus stacking software and Photoshop Transform do a decent job? I presume that not all kinds of Products need to be photographed with a Tilt shift lens or could it be the only lens I may need to use?
I have done an online course with a Pro recommending the 45mm TS-E, why is the 90mm preferable in your opinions?

Buying some decent glass was my next task alongside the camera choice.

D

Here's my 2 cents. I shoot food and have both the 45 and 90mm TS-Es. I use the 45 more than the 90, sometimes with the 1.4 TC. The reason is that the 90 puts the camera too far away from the camera to effectively hold reflectors or gobos. You can fix those on stands but it's faster to just hold one in if you want variations on their effect. Also when shooting overheads the 90 puts the camera too high and I have to stand on something in order to view. I'm over 6 feet tall.

It depends on the size of the plate as well. If you shoot full plates the 45 and the 1.4 TC will get the job done with little distortion to the plate. If you like to go in close on the food then the 90 may be a good choice.

For products one reason a TS-E is preferable is that it allows for the camera to see the top of a box/bottle etc. without distortion from the higher angle. So to answer the question of being essential, I would say no, but it is very handy.

EDIT: On the camera a 5Dc would probably work but shooting tethered with EOS utilities, the 5Dc is no longer supported on OSX Mavericks. I have no idea about Windows OS. I'm using a 5DII.


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Scatterbrained
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May 16, 2014 11:42 |  #18

dcooper wrote in post #16908377 (external link)
Thank you for all of your informative replies.

Thanks Scatterbrained and timbop,
I have a set of Strobe lights, grips, diffusers in my home Studio. I'm pretty knowledgeable when it comes to lighting, I think.

Regarding the 90mm TS-E, I have a few questions please. Do you think a Tilt Shift lens is essential for Product photography or can Focus stacking software and Photoshop Transform do a decent job? I presume that not all kinds of Products need to be photographed with a Tilt shift lens or could it be the only lens I may need to use?
I have done an online course with a Pro recommending the 45mm TS-E, why is the 90mm preferable in your opinions?

Buying some decent glass was my next task alongside the camera choice.

D

I prefer to get the perspective right in camera, as well as being able to control the plane of focus rather than have to stop the lens all the way down (and still not get everything sharp). I prefer a longer focal length for perspective reasons as 45mm can still see you in too close and result in some perspective distortion. Of course, you can use them with teleconverters; so a 45mm with a 1.4 and 2x teleconverter set will be pretty versatile. Personally, I use and adapted view camera. ;) Much more fine control than a TS-E lens, but very bulky and slow working. Not something I'd recommend for food. :oops::lol:

As far as 90mm putting the camera too far away I say bah. :lol: You shouldn't be using the shutter button for this kind of work anyway, that's what tethered shooting is for, or at least a shutter remote. :cool: I shoot tethered either into a tablet or into my Note (phone) wirelessly via DSLRController and the TPLink wireless router. Works great, and I can make adjustments to modifiers/flags/reflec​tors while watching the resultant changes on the screen. Beats walking back and forth to the camera to see if I got it right.


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breal101
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May 16, 2014 11:57 |  #19

Scatterbrained wrote in post #16908771 (external link)
I prefer to get the perspective right in camera, as well as being able to control the plane of focus rather than have to stop the lens all the way down (and still not get everything sharp). I prefer a longer focal length for perspective reasons as 45mm can still see you in too close and result in some perspective distortion. Of course, you can use them with teleconverters; so a 45mm with a 1.4 and 2x teleconverter set will be pretty versatile. Personally, I use and adapted view camera. ;) Much more fine control than a TS-E lens, but very bulky and slow working. Not something I'd recommend for food. :oops::lol:

As far as 90mm putting the camera too far away I say bah. :lol: You shouldn't be using the shutter button for this kind of work anyway, that's what tethered shooting is for, or at least a shutter remote. :cool: I shoot tethered either into a tablet or into my Note (phone) wirelessly via DSLRController and the TPLink wireless router. Works great, and I can make adjustments to modifiers/flags/reflec​tors while watching the resultant changes on the screen. Beats walking back and forth to the camera to see if I got it right.

Have you ever tried to shoot an overhead of a 12" plate with a 90mm lens? I say bah to you right back. I do shoot tethered with the CamRanger to a MacBook Pro. I'm talking about framing the initial shot without using live view.

As for the view camera to shoot food, FoodGuy uses one with a MF back as his primary tool. ;) He seems pretty successful as a NYC food photographer.


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Scatterbrained
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May 16, 2014 12:48 |  #20

breal101 wrote in post #16908818 (external link)
Have you ever tried to shoot an overhead of a 12" plate with a 90mm lens? I say bah to you right back. I do shoot tethered with the CamRanger to a MacBook Pro. I'm talking about framing the initial shot without using live view.

As for the view camera to shoot food, FoodGuy uses one with a MF back as his primary tool. ;) He seems pretty successful as a NYC food photographer.

I keep a step ladder.:D But it's also why I pointed out that a 45mm TS-E is plenty capable when paired with a set of TCs. The OP asked about food and small products. They are not the same and are not shot the same. Small products can be anything from a wedding ring or lipstick tube to a box of cereal. All of which will require different set ups than a plate of food. ;) There was no specification as to what "small products" meant.
My recommendation of the 90mm over the 45mm or 100mm macro was as a one lens option. If the budget only allowed me one lens it would be the 90mm; now if Canon would just update it so it works like the 24 and 17. . . . . . ..


Oh I know, but then that requires a MF back. :oops::lol: With a 35mm camera on a view camera you're limited to much longer focal lengths as the shorter ones (like say, 105mm) will want to focus inside of the camera body. :confused: A MF back is on my list. ;)


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dcooper
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May 17, 2014 05:39 |  #21

Thank you Scatterbrained and beal101 for both of your very helpful answers.




  
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fiveFPS
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Dec 26, 2014 03:13 as a reply to  @ dcooper's post |  #22

Dccoper. If you ever find yourself photographing macro food. You can get a set of extension tubes. It's a great investment ranging $30-100. You will have to focus in manual but it really brings the food to life size.

Post some of your food photos. I'm sure we all would love to see them.


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Canon DSLR Choice for Professional Food and Product Photography
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