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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Macro Talk 
Thread started 18 Dec 2014 (Thursday) 06:30
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Cooling insect for macro photography?

 
orionmystery
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Dec 18, 2014 06:30 |  #1

What do you think? Is it okay to do this? Will you do it?

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tandemhearts
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Dec 18, 2014 06:42 |  #2

Cooling is a established technique for storing and transporting insects from the field into research labs. If the insect is common and is gathered from an area that allows it, I see no problem.




  
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Lester ­ Wareham
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Post edited over 4 years ago by Lester Wareham with reason 'iphone factor'.
     
Dec 18, 2014 06:59 |  #3

I know some pros recommend it, personally I don't like it and see it as not a lot different from shooting dead specimens.
1) the position and attitude of the subject will most likely not be natural.
2) there is a real chance of overdoing the chilling and killing the specimen
3) whilst it is constrained it is not hunting for food, breeding, defending territory etc, so this may impact on survivability in a Darwinian sense.
4) it may standard practice in research but so is killing and dissecting (often the only way to ID to species level). The point is there are a lot more photographers than researches.

A small illustration of the power of disturbance is my local patch which is bog. The reserve managers have repaired the boardwalk and now it is safe for dog walkers to go around with their pets.
Unfortunatly they let their dogs swim in the bog pools also. This of course kills the dragonfly nymphs. There has been a dramatic drop in number of some species that were once common there.
Whilst this would be insignificant for the odd dog going for a splash there are probably hundreds a week.


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Post edited over 4 years ago by Dalantech.
     
Dec 18, 2014 07:00 |  #4

Nope -totally unethical to risk harming a subject for a photo and I have zero respect for the photographers who do it. Refrigerating something to cool it down simple means that the shooter was too lazy to set their alarm and get out early with the camera. Nature slows down most critters anyway, and if you find something lethargic early in the morning and feed it you might end up with a shots like these:

IMAGE: https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8627/16015710561_e4f5588083_b.jpg

IMAGE: https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8584/15889384135_396a76b470_b.jpg

IMAGE: https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3895/14601028789_a8cbc8b272_b.jpg

Much better than a still life photo of an insect that is probably dead because someone put it in the fridge...

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orionmystery
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Dec 18, 2014 09:29 |  #5

Thanks for your input, guys.

Lester, I think you summed it all up nicely!


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LordV
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Dec 19, 2014 01:07 |  #6

Tricky subject. I would not do it as a lot of the fun of macro for me is in the hunt for subjects and trying to get the photograph.
However I can appreciate if done correctly it should not harm the subject and obviously makes getting a shot a lot easier.

One thing I do do for example is trap insects that are in the house - try to feed them to keep them occupied and then photograph them before releasing them outside. I'm not sure if "ethically" this is much different to cooling them down.

Brian V.


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orionmystery
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Dec 19, 2014 01:40 |  #7

Thanks for your input, guys.

I guess cooling insect is not so bad if you are really careful and know how long they should be kept in the cooler/friedge without any harm.

But still, I won't do it.

A friend of mine brought up this point:

We do it as it's better for identification than killing and pinning. The native bees for ID we do, wake up and resume normal nesting behaviour and foraging within 2-5 mins.


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midwestusa4x4
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Dec 21, 2014 00:01 |  #8

I personally do not like to disturb bugs or animals in their natural surroundings. Part of the fun for me is the 'hunt' and trying to find insects in their natural environment and then trying to quickly decide how to get the best shot possible. I am not much of a morning person, but I have found that mornings lend themselves to some spectacular shots, with a combination of the morning sun, dew, and subjects that tend to move slower after a long cool night.


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Dec 21, 2014 00:21 |  #9

Here in Calgary, the bugs die by the hundreds of millions when the first frost comes, usually in September. Compared to that carnage, it does not seem so bad to cool a grasshopper to take its picture.

However, I have found it is by no means easy to make a good photo of a bug that has been cooled down. I'm still working on that part. For now, I'm not sure it is worth it.

Lester, I agree that dogs and their walkers do a lot of damage to our natural areas. The authorities in the areas I have visited won't do anything except put up signs. At one particular natural area, I suggested to a guy walking his dog that he should leash the dog. He asked me why. I told him the signs said so. He laughed, saying he had been walking his dog without a leash for 30 years without problem. And I think that is pretty well how it is in many if not most natural places.


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alann
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Dec 26, 2014 23:43 |  #10

I may be a stick in the mud but, I do not think it is the correct thing to do.


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Dec 28, 2014 14:41 |  #11

Wish I could chill my kids to get them to sit still for a family photo... :)


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Jan 03, 2015 18:10 |  #12

Get a grip...their bugs. :twisted:


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Keith ­ Newton
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Jan 07, 2015 22:30 |  #13

I've only done it a couple of times. both were Moths which flew into the road ahead of my truck. I hit the brakes and swerved to miss running over them, then backed up to see what I could get. I probably got 20 horrible shots of a Regal Moth trying to kill itself by flying up, then crashing back down into the road and or truck. I think she had already spent her eggs. I only found one later, and her abdomen was not full. If I had not cooled her down, It would have been a wasted chance.

Otherwise, I always try to capture images of critters doing what they do naturally wherever I find them. Sometimes that can be pretty hard to get close enough, and I have to use Mojo, but I can't talk about that. ha




  
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Jan 08, 2015 04:13 |  #14

Keith Newton wrote in post #17371680 (external link)
I've only done it a couple of times. both were Moths which flew into the road ahead of my truck. I hit the brakes and swerved to miss running over them, then backed up to see what I could get. I probably got 20 horrible shots of a Regal Moth trying to kill itself by flying up, then crashing back down into the road and or truck. I think she had already spent her eggs. I only found one later, and her abdomen was not full. If I had not cooled her down, It would have been a wasted chance.

Otherwise, I always try to capture images of critters doing what they do naturally wherever I find them. Sometimes that can be pretty hard to get close enough, and I have to use Mojo, but I can't talk about that. ha

LMAO! :lol:

Granted it's just a bug, and granted millions die each and every day. But I just can't see harming something to take a photo -call it bad karma. Just because people starve every day that's no justification to let it happen, or be the reason for it -see the difference? I've often wondered if people were kinda late to take Colony Collapse Disorder seriously because they're just bugs...

Talk to you later, I have to go spray my lawn for mosquitoes...  :p


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Cooling insect for macro photography?
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