Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 30 Dec 2014 (Tuesday) 13:55
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Light Meter?

 
davdgreat
Junior Member
26 posts
Joined Nov 2011
Location: Chicago
     
Dec 30, 2014 13:55 |  #1

So I have been working in a studio for a few months and on location and see some people using a light meter... What benefits does one of those offer that you can not get from the camera's TTL light meter or trail and error?

All help is appreciated.

Thanks,
Dave


-= davdgtreat photos =-
Body: Canon 5dm3, Canon 50D glass: Canon 24-70L 2.8, 70-200 L 2.8, 28-135, 50/1.8II flash: 600EX-RT, 580exII
website: davdgreat.smugmug.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
windpig
Chopped liver
Avatar
14,801 posts
Gallery: 5 photos
Likes: 1122
Joined Dec 2008
Location: Just South of Ballard
     
Dec 30, 2014 13:59 |  #2

When shooting manual it gets you close faster, makes for a quicker starting point.


Would you like to buy a vowel?
Go ahead, spin the wheel.
flickr (external link)
I'm accross the canal just south of Ballard, the town Seattle usurped in 1907.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
TerryMiller
Senior Member
323 posts
Gallery: 9 photos
Likes: 84
Joined Sep 2013
     
Dec 30, 2014 14:04 |  #3

You can see the relative intensity of each light. For example you could set the rim to f4 at a chosen shutter speed and ISO while setting the key to f5.6. That may speed up your set up. It may confuse things. I have one and use it initially but end up adjusting the lights later


my gear: T4i - EF-s 17-55, Ef-s 55-250 is stm, EF-S 10-22 usm, ef 100mm 2.8 macro

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Wilt
Reader's Digest Condensed version of War and Peace [POTN Vol 1]
Avatar
41,503 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 2456
Joined Aug 2005
Location: Belmont, CA
     
Dec 30, 2014 14:08 |  #4

An 'incident' meter reads the light falling onto the scene, whereas a reflected meter reads the light which is reflected by items in the scene.

There is only ONE amount of light falling onto the scene, but the reflected light is greater for a white object and lesser for a black object...two different readings. So 'subject failure' can fool a reflected light meter, whereas 'subject failure' never fools an incident light meter.


You need to give me OK to edit your image and repost! Keep POTN alive and well with member support https://photography-on-the.net/forum/donate.p​hp
Canon dSLR system, Olympus OM 35mm system, Bronica ETRSi 645 system, Horseman LS 4x5 system, Metz flashes, Dynalite studio lighting, and too many accessories to mention

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Alveric
Goldmember
Avatar
4,598 posts
Gallery: 38 photos
Likes: 1051
Joined Jan 2011
Location: Canada
Post edited over 4 years ago by Alveric.
     
Dec 30, 2014 14:11 |  #5
bannedPermanent ban

Spot on exposures every time: no guesswork, no chimping, no time wasted, no clients getting antsy, no 'oh $#¡+' moments when downloading the photos, and no time wasted 'fixing it' in post. 'Nuff said.


'The success of the second-rate is deplorable in itself; but it is more deplorable in that it very often obscures the genuine masterpiece. If the crowd runs after the false, it must neglect the true.' —Arthur Machen
Why 'The Histogram' Sux (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
gonzogolf
dumb remark memorialized
29,120 posts
Gallery: 7 photos
Likes: 1129
Joined Dec 2006
     
Dec 30, 2014 14:28 |  #6

A flashmeter would be pointless for ETTL, as pointless as using ETTL in a studio. But if you are serious about actual studio work a flashmeter is an essential tool.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
davdgreat
THREAD ­ STARTER
Junior Member
26 posts
Joined Nov 2011
Location: Chicago
     
Dec 30, 2014 15:03 |  #7

Thanks everyone for the replies.. Very helpful.. If you have any links to recommended ones and why that would be great!!! Thanks again!


-= davdgtreat photos =-
Body: Canon 5dm3, Canon 50D glass: Canon 24-70L 2.8, 70-200 L 2.8, 28-135, 50/1.8II flash: 600EX-RT, 580exII
website: davdgreat.smugmug.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
DC ­ Fan
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
5,881 posts
Gallery: 3 photos
Likes: 49
Joined Oct 2005
     
Dec 30, 2014 16:34 |  #8

davdgreat wrote in post #17357814 (external link)
Thanks everyone for the replies.. Very helpful.. If you have any links to recommended ones and why that would be great!!! Thanks again!

The Polaris SPD100 (external link) is a reasonably priced and effective unit that can be found at a discount price through an eBay vendor. As with other lighting equipment, it depends on a skilled and experienced user to get the maximum results, although it's easy to get incident readings (external link) with this meter.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
kjonnnn
Goldmember
1,204 posts
Likes: 86
Joined Apr 2005
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Post edited over 4 years ago by kjonnnn. (2 edits in all)
     
Jan 01, 2015 16:46 |  #9

A handheld light meter measures the light that FALLS ON a subject.
An in-camera meter measure the light that is REFLECTED FROM a subject.

Say you're taking a photo of someone wearing a sweater. A hand held light meter would measure the light that falls on the person. That measurement would be the same no matter the color or reflectiveness of the sweater. In other words, you'd get the same measurement of light (and camera setting), whether the person had on a black sweater, a white sweater, or a orange sweater.

On the other hand, a in-camera meter, measures the light REFLECTED FROM the subject, and would give different readings if the subject had a white sweater vs. a black sweater vs. an orange sweater, or even backlit. Thats why they say camera meters can be fooled.

https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=XfnOqEoiVRc (external link)

https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=1Xs3u2vn6AU (external link)

https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=_8bmCsoWIQU (external link)

https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=iR5frW5-onE (external link)




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
SkipD
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
20,476 posts
Likes: 154
Joined Dec 2002
Location: Southeastern WI, USA
     
Jan 01, 2015 17:40 |  #10

kjonnnn wrote in post #17360966 (external link)
A handheld light meter measures the light that FALLS ON a subject.
An in-camera meter measure the light that is REFLECTED FROM a subject.

The first part of the statements above is true ONLY if the handheld meter is configured as an incident meter. Most handheld meters that I have ever used or seen can be configured as either incident or reflected light meters.


Skip Douglas
A few cameras and over 50 years behind them .....
..... but still learning all the time.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Wilt
Reader's Digest Condensed version of War and Peace [POTN Vol 1]
Avatar
41,503 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 2456
Joined Aug 2005
Location: Belmont, CA
     
Jan 01, 2015 23:42 |  #11

I own three 'hand held' meters...


  1. One is a reflected lightmeter that is about 50 years old.
  2. One is a spotmeter with flash metering capability
  3. One is a incident meter which can be converted to reflected light or spot readings with the right accessory mounted.


...only ONE of which can do incident light readings

'hand held' ≠ 'incident' necessarily!

You need to give me OK to edit your image and repost! Keep POTN alive and well with member support https://photography-on-the.net/forum/donate.p​hp
Canon dSLR system, Olympus OM 35mm system, Bronica ETRSi 645 system, Horseman LS 4x5 system, Metz flashes, Dynalite studio lighting, and too many accessories to mention

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
v35skyline
Goldmember
3,572 posts
Likes: 16
Joined Apr 2007
Location: San Diego, CA
     
Jan 02, 2015 00:48 |  #12

davdgreat wrote in post #17357814 (external link)
Thanks everyone for the replies.. Very helpful.. If you have any links to recommended ones and why that would be great!!! Thanks again!

Try to find a used Sekonic l-358.


X100s | X-Pro1 | X-T1 | XF 14 | XF 18 | XF 35 | XF 56 | XF 60 | XF 10-24
Gear List & Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
RicoTudor
Senior Member
Avatar
621 posts
Likes: 356
Joined Jul 2014
Location: Chicago, IL
     
Jan 02, 2015 01:18 |  #13

I find a flash meter useful to establish the key/fill ratio in casual shooting situations (portrait), but then adjust the overall energy setting using the "blinkies"—gotta love digital for that. For complex tabletop, I use the blinkies for every light separately, and composite the frames: I'm then free to adjust the ratios in post.


Canon, Nikon, Contax, Leica, Sony, Profoto.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
flowrider
Goldmember
Avatar
3,585 posts
Gallery: 124 photos
Best ofs: 6
Likes: 784
Joined Dec 2009
Location: 604
     
Jan 02, 2015 02:20 |  #14

DC Fan wrote in post #17357964 (external link)
The Polaris SPD100 (external link) is a reasonably priced and effective unit that can be found at a discount price through an eBay vendor. As with other lighting equipment, it depends on a skilled and experienced user to get the maximum results, although it's easy to get incident readings (external link) with this meter.

I have this light meter and it's great for the price.


~Steve~
~ My Website-stevelowephoto.com (external link) ~ Facebook (external link)
Feedback Feedback Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
yendikeno
Senior Member
Avatar
359 posts
Gallery: 24 photos
Likes: 89
Joined Feb 2005
Location: Southern California
     
Jan 02, 2015 23:54 |  #15

v35skyline wrote in post #17361609 (external link)
Try to find a used Sekonic l-358.

Agreed. Bought one new quite some time ago, and love it.


_____________
Regards,
AZFred

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

2,783 views & 4 likes for this thread
Light Meter?
FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is OverTheHill
699 guests, 274 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.