Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 31 Dec 2014 (Wednesday) 22:26
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Is a Canon EOS Rebel T5 a good camera to begin with to use for professional photography?

 
jessiekins
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
Avatar
68 posts
Likes: 6
Joined Dec 2014
     
Jan 01, 2015 22:53 |  #16

linnjo wrote in post #17360482 (external link)
It's not the exact same camera, but it's one of the starter cameras:

I had the Canon EOS 550D and a 18-55mm lens for the longest time, and I think it produced some good images, and it's definitely good enough when you're getting started. After a while I got the 50mm 1.4 to get more DOF and better portraits. And after who knows how long I felt like I had outgrown my 550D, because I felt like it was limiting my options, so I moved on to a 5D mk II.

If you don't mind me sharing, these were taken with the 550D and 18-55mm. Not exactly portraits, but an example of something your gear could produce:

QUOTED IMAGE

Linnjo:
Thank you for input. How haunting and thoughtful these images are. I love the second image--Oh his glistening, sad eyes! It makes me wonder. Thank you.


Jessica Rose

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
jessiekins
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
Avatar
68 posts
Likes: 6
Joined Dec 2014
     
Jan 01, 2015 23:03 |  #17

Intheswamp wrote in post #17360548 (external link)
Remember that with your T5 you will have a 1.6 crop factor to contend with. A 100mm will give you a 160mm perspective...a 50mm will give you an 80mm.......a 200mm will give you a 320mm....etc.,. Crop cameras are favored for enhancing the reach of zooms and for magnification of macros but can be excellent for portraits, etc., too. The problem with crop cameras is that wide angle lenses suffer from also being lengthened....a 20mm becomes 32mm....a 28mm becomes a 45mm...etc., so you lose the really "wide angle" view of some lenses.

The Canon 85mm f1.8 non-L is a very good, sharp and affordable lens that is often recommended for portrait work. You can pick them up refurbished on Canon's website for prices that gravitate around $300 (depending on current sales). I just looked at it looks like that model is currently out of stock. The refurbed lenses from Canon are great deals, though you might have to check all along before you find the lens that you're looking for in stock...they come with a 1-year warranty just like new lenses do. Canon refurb lens link (external link). But, the 85mm on a crop camera results in a field of view equivalent to a 135mm.

When buying Canon lenses, they build them with two different mounts. EF-S lenses are designed for (and work properly) on crop cameras but not full-frame cameras. EF lenses, on the other hand, will work fine on either crop or full-frame cameras. One of the finest crop-camera lenses is the EF-S 17-55 f2.8....very sharp and fast. I keep one on my T2i (550D) all the time. I recently purchased a 6D and I'm using a Tamron 28-75mm f2.8 on it...it's a pretty good lens and seems to do a decent job but I'm looking for something else for that camera...maybe something longer. The image quality of the EF-S 17-55 f2.8 makes it the only crop-lens that I own. Other lenses (I don't own a lot of them) are all EF lenses so they can work on either camera.

Look at the pictures that you have taken and note the focal length that they were shot at...this might point to the fact that a nice, sharp prime might be worth considering. The EF 50mm f1.8 is highly affordable and is a nice, low-light lens....and using the crop-factor of your camera puts you into the 80mm range. :)

Naturally, moving into the "L" glass class of lenses brings enhanced (most of the time) image quality and build quality...but at much enhanced pricing, too.

Use the camera you have for now, it is quiet capable...as you shoot and start settling into *your* way of seeing and shooting you will start gravitating to the lenses that will work for you style.

Best wishes,
Ed

Intheswamp/Ed:

What is a prime lens? I don't understand this term. Wow, your intelligence in the field astounds me. I am somewhat envious! Thank you. I want a very sharp and fast lens--I will look into the Canon 85mm. I already feel a longing for the EF-S 17-55 f2.8 haha! The price tag saddens me! Especially because I'm in college, so it's quite hard to buy lenses... I will get there.

Thank you. :-)


Jessica Rose

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
LevelPebble
Member
Avatar
62 posts
Gallery: 11 photos
Likes: 24
Joined Dec 2014
Location: Michigan, USA
     
Jan 01, 2015 23:07 |  #18

jessiekins wrote in post #17361483 (external link)
LevelPebble: What is a prime lens? What is the difference between that and my 18-55mm lens?
Best,
Jessica

Your 18-55 lens is a zoom lens. It can be used at any focal length between 18 and 55 mm. You can zoom in to make your subject appear larger or zoom out to make it appear smaller.

A prime lens has a fixed focal length; the only way to get your subject smaller or larger is by physically moving closer of farther away with your feet. Because prime lens have no moving parts, they generally have better optical performance. The trade off is that they are much less versatile than zooms.

My recommendation is to use the 18-55 lens you have and maybe purchase the EF 50 f 1.8 I mentioned earlier (it is a prime and very affordable) The 55-250 would only be of use if you were planning on taking pictures from subject far away. This advice is based on your statement that you were interested in portrait type photography.


Motorsports Photographer for ARCA at Flat Rock/Toledo Speedway

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
jessiekins
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
Avatar
68 posts
Likes: 6
Joined Dec 2014
     
Jan 01, 2015 23:09 |  #19

PineBomb wrote in post #17361255 (external link)
Just shoot as much as you can with that camera. It's definitely capable of doing the photos you want, and you'll learn a lot from it. I think you'll find that the limitations associated with an entry-level camera are often not identified and appreciated until you've had a good deal of practice, so there's no reason to rush to the next step. One example is that manual operation of a Rebel is more cumbersome than with other models, but if you're not shooting in manual mode, then it isn't a limitation for the time being.

The sooner you begin to learn to shoot with flash, the better. Many photographers shy away from it, but it will improve your portrait work. In fact, I recommend that you get a speedlite before seeking out other lenses, and visit the flash and studio lighting forum here for tons of great tips. Canon speedlites are expensive, but there are more affordable options. Many here like the YongNuo offerings. The lens suggestions in this thread are good, but without knowing what size your home studio will be I can't really recommend a suitable focal length (e.g., in a confined space, an 85mm lens may be too long). Your 18-55mm will be a good start for now.

I shoot in manual mode. I learned how to adjust my aperture, ISO, and shutter speed. I sometimes shoot in AUTO ISO because I find the lighting can be tricky. I will do some lurking in this forum, thank you for the tips. :-)


Jessica Rose

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
PineBomb
I have many notable flaws
Avatar
2,470 posts
Gallery: 92 photos
Likes: 1190
Joined Apr 2014
Location: Austin, Texas
     
Jan 01, 2015 23:14 |  #20

Jessica, a zoom lens has a variable focal length like your 18-55mm, while a prime lens has a fixed focal length that does not zoom (e.g., the 50mm 1.8, 50mm 1.4, 50mm L, 85mm 1.8, etc.).

I used to shoot the 17-55 2.8, and it is indeed a very good lens. You can find them used between $500-$600. There are 3rd party alternatives to consider, but opinions on them differ.


-Matt
Website (external link) | flickr (external link) | instagram (external link) | street portrait project on instagram (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
LevelPebble
Member
Avatar
62 posts
Gallery: 11 photos
Likes: 24
Joined Dec 2014
Location: Michigan, USA
Post edited over 4 years ago by LevelPebble. (2 edits in all)
     
Jan 01, 2015 23:40 |  #21

Here is the type of picture I normally take using a Canon T1i with the same 18-55 lens that you have. I have used that lens for the last 3 years and just last week decided to upgrade.

This was taken with the lens nearly zoomed in to the maximum of 55 mm. If I decided that I shoot at this distance a lot, I could use a 50 mm prime lens instead.

Compare to a picture below I took a couple seconds later that was zoomed out without changing my position.

PHOTOBUCKET EMBEDDING IS DISABLED BY THIS MEMBER.
Photobucket sends ads instead of embedding photos from their free galleries.
Click the link (if available) below to see the image in a gallery page.

http://i202.photobucke​t.com …1/indyrand/IMG_​9522-2.jpg (external link)
on photobucket

Motorsports Photographer for ARCA at Flat Rock/Toledo Speedway

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
LevelPebble
Member
Avatar
62 posts
Gallery: 11 photos
Likes: 24
Joined Dec 2014
Location: Michigan, USA
Post edited over 4 years ago by LevelPebble. (5 edits in all)
     
Jan 01, 2015 23:58 |  #22

Here is the same shot taken zoomed out (@ 32 mm) Since I had a zoom, I didn't have to move, but just zoomed out. Had I wanted to, I could have zoomed out further until I got to 18 mm and the car would have been smaller yet.

If I had a the same 50 mm prime lens I mentioned in the post above, I would have needed to back up compared to the previous shot.

But, if I decided this was the focal length I shoot at very frequently, I could get a 30 mm prime instead of the 50 mm previously mentioned.

And naturally, I could have just not zoomed at all and cropped this shot to make it look like the one above.

PHOTOBUCKET EMBEDDING IS DISABLED BY THIS MEMBER.
Photobucket sends ads instead of embedding photos from their free galleries.
Click the link (if available) below to see the image in a gallery page.

http://i202.photobucke​t.com …151/indyrand/IM​G_9523.jpg (external link)
on photobucket

Motorsports Photographer for ARCA at Flat Rock/Toledo Speedway

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
LevelPebble
Member
Avatar
62 posts
Gallery: 11 photos
Likes: 24
Joined Dec 2014
Location: Michigan, USA
Post edited over 4 years ago by LevelPebble. (7 edits in all)
     
Jan 02, 2015 00:27 |  #23

The point I was trying to illustrate with the pictures I posted of the race car was that before thinking of buying a prime lens, you need to use the 18-55 for awhile to really determine what focal length you would need. Also wanted to show that the same lens can capture some very good shots.

You can see where in the 18-55 range you use most frequently and that would be the prime to consider looking at. You can get data from the pictures to see what settings worked best. The 18-55 lens will give some decent pictures while you determine what you might need to buy next. The worst thing to do is go out and start buying stuff that isn't what you really need for your style etc.

Oh, and even though the 18-55 is a "starter" lens, It was what I used for three years. The driver that won this race was thrilled with the quality of the pictures I took with it and purchased several copies.

FYI, I finally decided to spend some $$ and just bought something nicer last week ( EF 24-70 f4L zoom) Unfortunately, I have to wait until April when race season starts again to really try it out.


Motorsports Photographer for ARCA at Flat Rock/Toledo Speedway

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
jessiekins
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
Avatar
68 posts
Likes: 6
Joined Dec 2014
     
Jan 02, 2015 12:56 |  #24

LevelPebble wrote in post #17361592 (external link)
The point I was trying to illustrate with the pictures I posted of the race car was that before thinking of buying a prime lens, you need to use the 18-55 for awhile to really determine what focal length you would need. Also wanted to show that the same lens can capture some very good shots.

You can see where in the 18-55 range you use most frequently and that would be the prime to consider looking at. You can get data from the pictures to see what settings worked best. The 18-55 lens will give some decent pictures while you determine what you might need to buy next. The worst thing to do is go out and start buying stuff that isn't what you really need for your style etc.

FYI, I finally decided to spend some $$ and just bought something nicer last week ( EF 24-70 f4L zoom) Unfortunately, I have to wait until April when race season starts again to really try it out.


Thank you. I understand. However, I want a closer zoom. I want sharpness. I feel like my 18-55mm isn't the best for portrait photography. I want to begin my photography business with great quality. Do you know what I mean? Perhaps it is my manual settings, so I will continue to practice.


Jessica Rose

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
CameraMan
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
13,336 posts
Gallery: 26 photos
Likes: 741
Joined Dec 2010
Location: In The Sticks
Post edited over 4 years ago by CameraMan. (3 edits in all)
     
Jan 02, 2015 14:01 |  #25

Something that a fast prime lens has that most zooms do not is short DOF (Depth of Field). DOF is used in an artistic style and has some great qualities.

Here are a couple shots I did using DOF.

The first image was sort of a test shot for the 50mm 1.8 you've heard about. I focused on the front jar and set my aperture at 1.8 to put everything else out of focus.

The second one I shot with a 50mm 1.4 at f/1.4. I focused on the piano players hands in this shot.

That is basically what I use those lenses for. It's a tricky technique. Breathing and timing is crucial. The first photo, as I mentioned, was a test. It's not perfectly in focus but it still shos the powerful DOF that it does have.

Prime lenses are best for those nice wide aperture shots like these. Most zoom lenses cannot shoot this wide open.

I should also note that the first shot was done with a Rebel XT (350D). Much older than your T5. The second was done with a Full Frame 5D Mark II.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Photographer (external link) | The Toys! | Facebook (external link) | Video (external link) | Flickr (external link)
Shampoo sounds like an unfortunate name for a hair product.
You're a ghost driving a meat-coated skeleton made from stardust, riding a rock, hurtling through space. Fear Nothing!

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Charlie
Guess What! I'm Pregnant!
16,117 posts
Gallery: 8 photos
Likes: 6182
Joined Sep 2007
Post edited over 4 years ago by Charlie.
     
Jan 02, 2015 16:49 |  #26

unfortunately, photography involves a LOT of trial and error. If you want blistering sharp portraits with beautiful background blur, you should stick with something like a 5D mark 2 and newer, assuming you have the money. I shot APS-C for many years, was never REALLY happy with sharpness and overall IQ till I jumped to FF.

If all you care is very high IQ, I would get the lowest end model with the largest sensor, like the t4i/t5i if you are ok with the smaller sensor, or a 5Dc/2/6D if you want the bigger sensor. If you can afford a larger sensor, certainly go for it. I feel that even with the cheapest lenses on a larger sensor, I can beat or exceed the IQ of the best lenses on a smaller sensor.


Sony A7riii/A9 - FE 12-24/4 - FE 24-240 - SY 24/2.8 - FE 28/2 - FE 35/2.8 - FE 50/1.8 - FE 85/1.8 - EF 135/1.8 Art - F 600/5.6 - CZ 100-300 - Astro Rok 14/2.8 - Tamron 17-28/2.8 - 28-75/2.8 RXD, 70-200/2.8 VC

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
CameraMan
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
13,336 posts
Gallery: 26 photos
Likes: 741
Joined Dec 2010
Location: In The Sticks
     
Jan 02, 2015 17:22 |  #27

Charlie wrote in post #17362702 (external link)
unfortunately, photography involves a LOT of trial and error. If you want blistering sharp portraits with beautiful background blur, you should stick with something like a 5D mark 2 and newer, assuming you have the money. I shot APS-C for many years, was never REALLY happy with sharpness and overall IQ till I jumped to FF.

If all you care is very high IQ, I would get the lowest end model with the largest sensor, like the t4i/t5i if you are ok with the smaller sensor, or a 5Dc/2/6D if you want the bigger sensor. If you can afford a larger sensor, certainly go for it. I feel that even with the cheapest lenses on a larger sensor, I can beat or exceed the IQ of the best lenses on a smaller sensor.

I've read her other thread she started and she did mention that she already bought the T5. I think it's a great camera to start out with. She's starting out great using manual settings. She has the right idea so far and I think down the road when she buys a better camera she will be in awe of it's control settings. Maybe she'll be one of the first to buy a 5D Mark IV! :)


Photographer (external link) | The Toys! | Facebook (external link) | Video (external link) | Flickr (external link)
Shampoo sounds like an unfortunate name for a hair product.
You're a ghost driving a meat-coated skeleton made from stardust, riding a rock, hurtling through space. Fear Nothing!

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Intheswamp
Goldmember
1,423 posts
Gallery: 61 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 629
Joined Sep 2013
Location: South Alabama
     
Jan 02, 2015 18:22 as a reply to  @ jessiekins's post |  #28

A few observations...

You mentioned that you want sharper images and you also mentioned a zoom. Without paying a fairly premium price a zoom lens that will give you significant "pop" will be hard to find unless you stumble upon a really, really good deal. If the 17-55 f2.8 is to expensive then you might want to re-evaluate things. The 18-135 f3.5 is a pretty good performer, it is also an EF-S (crop) lens so it won't bridge over for use with full-frame cameras. It's not the best low-light lens, though. I've got one of these that I am going to sell (actually have two). Also the Tamron 28-75 f2.8 is a fairly decent lens, not the peak of quality but a very capable lens...I have one hanging on the front of my 6D...it works on either crop or full-frame cameras.

You mention that you're planning on a business. You mentioned, also, that you didn't particularly care for bokeh....the thing is, though, that many of your clients *will* like it...you can always tighten up the aperture to lose the bokeh but if the camera isn't capable of good bokeh to start with you can't "create it from nothing".

Since you have shot some at the 55mm end of your kit zoom and you mention that you want to get "closer" then I wouldn't opt right now for the 50mm "nifty-fifty". You appear to need to go longer. The first prime lens I would look at would be the 85mm f1.8 (as I've mentioned before). It's image quality is very, very good for the investment..sharp, crisp, clear. When used on a crop body it's field of view is equivalent to a 135mm which during the era of 35mm film cameras was the "go to" portrait lens. Portrait lenses usually range from about 80mm to 135mm...the reason is that facial distortion is at pretty much a minimum in this focal length range. You will definitely get "closer" with the 85mm on your crop camera and later if you buy a full-frame body it will be a fine lens on it as well.

Will your friend let you use her longer zoom to see how you like it? That lens is also a kit lens...remember you said you wanted "sharper". :) Primes are the quickest path to "sharp"....less glass and tubes to get out of line.

Remember, too, that with longer lenses you need more working room.

Ah well, seems there was something else I wanted to say but it slips my mind. These were a few thoughts...and they are worth at least what you paid for them. :-D

Best wishes,
Ed


www.beeweather.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
CameraMan
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
13,336 posts
Gallery: 26 photos
Likes: 741
Joined Dec 2010
Location: In The Sticks
Post edited over 4 years ago by CameraMan. (3 edits in all)
     
Jan 02, 2015 19:08 |  #29

Personally I would stay away from the EF-S lenses especially if you are definitely planning on going to Full Frame sensor in the near or distant future. My dilemma was I had some great EF-S lenses and when I bought my 5D Mark II I couldn't use the EF-S lenses without cropping the images later. So my solution was to get a better crop body to supplement my 5D Mark II. I went with a 40D. It works perfectly with my EF-S lenses and works quite well with my EF lenses also. It's a great all around camera body and a perfect companion to the 5D Mark II.

On the subject of Zooms... You have a few options. The 24-105 L series lens is a AWESOME lens! It came as a kit lens to my 5D Mark II and to me THAT was a match made in heaven. I use it all the time when I do weddings. The 24mm end is perfect for those nice wide church shots and the 105mm is great for the closeups.

The cheaper alternative to the 24-105 is the 28-135. This too is a great lens at the extremes and in between and it's about half the price of the 24-105. It would also serve you well at a wedding or shooting portraits.

This photo was shot with my 24-105 at f/6.3 and I still managed to get some nice Bokeh with that setting...


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Photographer (external link) | The Toys! | Facebook (external link) | Video (external link) | Flickr (external link)
Shampoo sounds like an unfortunate name for a hair product.
You're a ghost driving a meat-coated skeleton made from stardust, riding a rock, hurtling through space. Fear Nothing!

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
mrfixitx
Senior Member
Avatar
607 posts
Gallery: 48 photos
Likes: 265
Joined Aug 2007
Location: Omaha NE
     
Jan 02, 2015 19:43 as a reply to  @ CameraMan's post |  #30

One thing you should think about before investing to heavily in lenses is where will this photography take place? Are you going to be doing mostly in home portraits or will you be outside etc...

If you shooting a lot inside you will certainly want to pick up a dedicated flash of some kind and learn to use the flash off camera(not connected to the hot shoe). Having a good portable light will help a lot in indoor situations vs. shooting at high ISO and dealing with the noise and loss of sharpness.

If money is a concern look for some 3rd party 18-50mm f2.8 lenses for sharper photos. Both Sigma and Tamron make some excellent third party lenses that are both significantly faster(larger aperture that lets in more light) and sharper than the 18-55 kit lens.

While full frame certainly has the best high ISO image quality don't discount the image quality on crop bodies especially given the price difference. Below a photo from last year that was taken on the 40D(which is about 7 years old now) and a sigma 18-50mm f2.8 lens I picked up used for around $300. While its not as sharp as say an 85mm f1.8 lens it is much sharper than the kit lens your rebel came with (and that I had been using previously)

IMAGE: http://www.brandons-photography.com/Portraits/Portraits/i-pVwtX2p/1/L/_MG_6569-L.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.brandons-photography.com …its/Portraits/i​-pVwtX2p/A  (external link)

Dodging and burning are steps to take care of mistakes God made in establishing tonal relationships! - Ansel Adams (external link)
http://www.brandons-photography.com/ (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

51,050 views & 76 likes for this thread
Is a Canon EOS Rebel T5 a good camera to begin with to use for professional photography?
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is gardenchefs
1028 guests, 339 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.