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Thread started 03 Jan 2015 (Saturday) 19:49
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Has anyone found some exposure issues with the 6D?

 
britinjapan
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Jan 03, 2015 19:49 |  #1

I find that especially on center focus, when taking portraits in any light, but especially in lower light (I mean less than very bright, and not dark), a small move in the camera from say eye to forehead will bring on quite different settings, or at least a look in the photo that shows a different exposure (under/over). Ive never found this with my Nikons, and had this with my Olympus to the extent I got it fixed under warranty, but I can't replicate this on the Canon enough to warrant to take it in, though perhaps I should. If I take say 10 shots of a child, I tend to get this in certain conditions - but as I say Im troubled to replicate it. It could be that the sensor is overly sensitive, and doing the right job, but maybe missing exposures because its too slow. Any thoughts on this?


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Jan 03, 2015 20:13 |  #2

Are you using spot metering?


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britinjapan
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Jan 03, 2015 20:58 |  #3

No, generally evaluative, or at least when this happened. As I say, its really small differences, but enough to see on the camera display, and never had this with the Nikons.


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Jan 03, 2015 21:06 as a reply to  @ britinjapan's post |  #4

Evaluative metering still weights the exposure to the focus point. So I think that a small change in exposure in response to a small change in focus point is normal.


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britinjapan
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Jan 03, 2015 21:09 |  #5

Ive just re-run a test. Focussed on one eye, comes out at 1/125@5.0. Focus on other eye, and its 1/160@5.6 clearly darker exposure. Seem to have nailed an example - is this usual just by changing eye, to get both faster and higher F, so the picture is darker? Ive tried again - this time the light source is on the right. Focus on the left eye, and 1/100@4, focus on right eye and get 1/125@4.5. Its the lighter side, so understandable, but the overall picture looks darker...there is consistency about same focus spot, just my concern is by moving focus spot the overall exposure look changes remarkably.


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britinjapan
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Jan 03, 2015 21:10 |  #6

Can I run a consistency check another way, or on another metering setting? thanks


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GeoKras1989
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Jan 03, 2015 23:25 |  #7
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britinjapan wrote in post #17364721 (external link)
Ive just re-run a test. Focussed on one eye, comes out at 1/125@5.0. Focus on other eye, and its 1/160@5.6 clearly darker exposure. Seem to have nailed an example - is this usual just by changing eye, to get both faster and higher F, so the picture is darker? Ive tried again - this time the light source is on the right. Focus on the left eye, and 1/100@4, focus on right eye and get 1/125@4.5. Its the lighter side, so understandable, but the overall picture looks darker...there is consistency about same focus spot, just my concern is by moving focus spot the overall exposure look changes remarkably.

No offense, but are you using P-mode, or Green-Box? On a 6D? Do you also have training wheels on your Lamborghini? :)

Kidding aside, I've never had an exposure problem with my 6D that wasn't my fault.


WARNING: I often dispense advice in fields I know little about!

  
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britinjapan
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Jan 04, 2015 07:03 |  #8

Ha ha...never used green mode, its all P mode. Assuming Im doing all correctly -) my conclusion is that Canon is more sensitive than Nikon by far...


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Jan 04, 2015 10:00 |  #9

Is the exposure darker or lighter when you move to the forehead. Could be because the eyes are set into a slight shadow and forehead is flat and more reflective than the eyes. I would say take it off P and use manual and set the F and shutter and leave it there by using the in camera meter and adjust for the correct exposure you like. Remember that light (18% gray) the camera uses to set the exposure reflects differently on different shades of people.
Just a suggestion.
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Jan 04, 2015 17:26 |  #10

M mode provides you with an easy to use light meter... :) Focus on your point of reference and note the position of the exposure indicator in the viewfinder. Then move focus to the other point of reference and when the indicator moves up down (or left or right) notice the difference in exposure.
I use this "scanning the scene" very often to get a feeling for the dynamic range of the scene.


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Jan 04, 2015 18:27 |  #11

britinjapan wrote in post #17364721 (external link)
Ive just re-run a test. Focussed on one eye, comes out at 1/125@5.0. Focus on other eye, and its 1/160@5.6 clearly darker exposure. Seem to have nailed an example - is this usual just by changing eye, to get both faster and higher F, so the picture is darker? Ive tried again - this time the light source is on the right. Focus on the left eye, and 1/100@4, focus on right eye and get 1/125@4.5. Its the lighter side, so understandable, but the overall picture looks darker...there is consistency about same focus spot, just my concern is by moving focus spot the overall exposure look changes remarkably.

Keep in mind that, when in evaluative, the meter takes the whole scene into account. What was behind your subject? Was the background brighter on the right?

If you were shooting in a studio environment and using a white background, with just the one light source on the right, then moving the camera more to the right will mean that more of the better lit white background on the right will be in the scene, and less of the less well lit background on the left. The light on the subject won't have changed but, with the extra light bouncing off the brighter side of the background, the camera will suggest less exposure and probably underexpose the shot. This is exactly how it is supposed to work, in that situation you need to meter off just the subject and then allow for skin tone and decide on the correct exposure.

Camera meters don't give you the "correct" exposure, they just tell you how much light is reflecting back from the area you are metering. It is then up to you to look at that reading then consider the tones in the scene and set exposure according to your judgement.




  
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britinjapan
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Jan 05, 2015 06:51 |  #12

Many thanks for the information. Sorry, I may have sounded not very well versed in these things (perhaps Im not!), but my experience was with Nikon where I did not get such differences in metering and exposure. It was perhaps that I set the metering zone to a wider area (which I think you can do at Nikon), but I never found such sensitivity at Nikon. Also, I had this problem at Olympus, which was repaired under guaranty, so I tended to get nervous when my Canon was so sensitive. But what you say makes sense, and I will try the test on manual. Im sure there is noting wrong, just adjusting to the different system, and learning the basics again. Very helpful comments.


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Jan 05, 2015 13:15 |  #13

I honestly would try spot metering and see if the disparity in the settings is as drastic. I am unlike many here, I use spot metering almost exclusively, whereas most here prefer evaluative.
My using P mode, you are letting the camera make a lot of decisions for you. If you use spot and P, you should still only see a little difference in the overall settings. To go from 1/125 at F5 to 1/160 at F5.6 is just odd to me. If it had been 1/160 at f5 and then 1/125 at f5.6 it would have made more sense. So something is making it decide to change the settings that much.
I think if you use spot metering, you take out out some of the factors.


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Jan 05, 2015 16:54 |  #14

I think I know what you mean about the sensitivity with evaluative actually. I always used to use AV doing landscapes on a tripod with my t1i (I know M would be perhaps better, but it worked at the time). However, when I got my 5DII I realized why everyone said to use M. In Av small adjustments of the composition would often result is a different metered exposure. I remember now it confusing the heck out of me at the time.

I still do use AV quite a bit and it seems to work OK with evaluative, but I don't do much portraiture and stick to M if the light is not changing. Honestly I think Canon's metering and auto-exposure modes work better in their compacts than their DSLRs.


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Jan 05, 2015 17:15 |  #15

Have you considered that with a 63 zone iFCL metering system, each zone is smaller, so any shift due to reframing will register with smaller changes in position than the Nikon camera you are accustomed to?


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Has anyone found some exposure issues with the 6D?
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