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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Astronomy & Celestial 
Thread started 06 Jan 2015 (Tuesday) 20:12
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Show us your Comet Lovejoy C/2014 Q2 images

 
Davenn
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Jan 16, 2015 20:40 |  #76

nice pic :)

I did the same pic last nite too, the orientation is a bit different for us in the southern hemisphere ;)


Dave


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Celestron
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Jan 16, 2015 23:09 |  #77

Davenn wrote in post #17386219 (external link)
hi gang

4) Steve and Ron (Nighthound and Celestron) ... raising the BP, you guys spoke of, can you please clarify how to do that :)

you guys have pushed me to improve my efforts, so appreciated

cheers
Dave

Dave when you have stacked your image and ready to edit watch your Histogram scale . When you have your peaks to run off the far left side you have clipped your BPs' You need to make adjustments to bring the peaks back in so that the BP is not clipped . Here is a gentleman that explains fairly well how to set your Wps' and BPs' also . Maybe this link will help .

http://ralphnordstromp​hotography.com …graph-black-white-points/ (external link)




  
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Davenn
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Jan 17, 2015 02:56 |  #78

Thanks for that link, Ron, have saved it as a word file and embedded the images for easy future reference

so do you use the pp in DSS or do you just save the image and pp in LR or PS ?


Dave


A picture is worth 1000 words ;)
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Miki ­ G
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Jan 17, 2015 05:18 |  #79

Davenn wrote in post #17384160 (external link)
B

BP = Black Point ?
When I did the stacking of the 7 x 30 sec images, I could see the tail, but only when the image was quite bright

as soon as I set the background to black, the tail virtually disappears as with this .....

But still a vast improvement over the single 30 sec exp :)
I just need more editing experience/guidance

Well done Davenn.
I'm in the same boat when it comes to PP. This is one I took last night 5x 30 sec exposures and a lot of playing around with various adjustments to try make the tail visible.

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JJ3
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Jan 17, 2015 08:19 |  #80

Clear skies last night. Lovejoy appeared slightly brighter than a week ago and a hint of a tail. I could barely make it out with the naked eye, but easily findable with binoculars. Here are a couple of single frame pictures. I'm going to have to play around with stacking.


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Nighthound
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Jan 17, 2015 13:51 |  #81

Davenn wrote in post #17386219 (external link)
hi gang

went out again last nite for a final blast of pix of the comet
did 30 x 30 sec lights, 4 30 sec darks and 3 x 1/4000 sec bias frames

Again the comet head looks great but no significant tail can be seen

1) Nchant and others who are getting these awesome shots .... do you do any levels processing in DSS or just save the stacked image and do all in PS etc ?
2) I have tried both ways and just cant get the results
3) Would any of you mind doing a step by step processing workflow ? I'm sure I'm not the only one who would be grateful
either step by step using both DSS and PS processing ... or whichever method you prefer
4) Steve and Ron (Nighthound and Celestron) ... raising the BP, you guys spoke of, can you please clarify how to do that :)

you guys have pushed me to improve my efforts, so appreciated

also did a bunch of images for M42, Eta Carina, SMC with 47 Tuc ... yet to play with them

cheers
Dave

Dave, raising the black in Photoshop is done in curves by grabbing the low end handle and raising up. You'll see the background get brighter(gray). This is not what you want to rely on in post process. It's just a way to check for low end data that's still in tact and is buried in black. If the black point gets clipped in the stack or in output then data has already been lost and cannot be seen by doing what I described, or salvaged in Photoshoip. I've seen many DSS images with the black point clipped but I have no way of knowing how that came to be, by automation or operator. I don't use DSS since I'm Mac based so hopefully others can help with preventing black point clip in DSS. You'll want a somewhat deep gray background to work with in Photoshop when you stretch the image. This will assure that all low end data is in tact and not compromised or lost in excessive black. There's a temptation to raise the black point for some to hide noise, which it does but at the cost of tossing faint data and details. When I stretch an image I go very slow using curves in multiple iterations, carefully monitoring the image details across the histogram. Think of this as a marathon not a sprint, going slow will prevent any destructive adjustments.

Check this out this link as a starting point for Photoshop. Note on step 3 the image graph in Levels shows the black point not touching the left end of the graph box, this is a good thing. If the low end data is clipped that vertical black area would be slammed all the way left, same with the graph in Curves. As you stretch the image keep an eye on that area to protect the black point. Also, don't over stretch the white point either, this will bloat your stars and give them an unnatural look.
http://myastroimages.c​om …_To_Use_PhotoSh​op_Curves/ (external link)


Steve
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SteveEllwoodPhotograph​y.com (external link)

  
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Celestron
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Jan 17, 2015 15:57 |  #82

Davenn wrote in post #17386487 (external link)
Thanks for that link, Ron, have saved it as a word file and embedded the images for easy future reference

so do you use the pp in DSS or do you just save the image and pp in LR or PS ?


Dave


Dave When I use DSS I go through the steps of stacking first . Once this is completed and final results appear you will notice that at the bottom of the screen will be a Histogram for each color . You'll notice that each color will have their own individual peak . You want to adjust the peaks where all peaks cover each other and you'll notice the individual peak will turn gray as all colors cover each other .

Adjust each peak the blue peak first centering the peak . Then adjust the red peak to where you just see a fine blue line of the peak in front of the red peak . Then adjust the green peak where it's on top the red peak but slightly behind . As your watching the single peak tho and you see it turn gray your trying to make the gray peak as big (wide) as possible keeping the peak as close to center as possible . I know this sounds strange but you will see what I mean when you stack images in DSS . When you accomplish this you'll start seeing your final image with some color to it but in proper way .

Once your satisfied with the results then save and finish PP in PS or LR or whatever your editor is . Just remember one thing . In DSS , when your playing with the sliders for the peaks color don't check the box that allows you to move all at the same time . You need to adjust each peak individually . I hope this helps some .




  
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Dano_nav
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Jan 17, 2015 15:59 |  #83

While I'm admittedly not an astrophotographer, I went out and gave it a try last night. ISO 1600, 70mm, 10 sec, f2.8. Think I'm going to try it again tonight after reading more about how to accomplish this.


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Celestron
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Post edited over 3 years ago by Celestron.
     
Jan 17, 2015 16:14 |  #84

Dano_nav wrote in post #17387176 (external link)
While I'm admittedly not an astrophotographer, I went out and gave it a try last night. ISO 1600, 70mm, 10 sec, f2.8. Think I'm going to try it again tonight after reading more about how to accomplish this.


Dano , good start . I do notice your stars are slightly out of focus tho . No worry tho that is easily fixed . While the camera is on a tripod point it towards the brightest star you see in the sky and center it in the viewer . You can use live view and zoom in to max and focus your lens manually . When you do this make sure your lens is set to MF .

Or you can do as I do . I set my lens on AF , zoom all the way in and use the shutter button to AF on the brightest star in the sky which is usually Sirius which is just below the Orion constellation . Once the green focus light inside the viewer stays on steadily then switch the AF/MF switch on the lens back to MF and never touch the lens focus rings again . Just point the camera toward the area of night sky you want to image and use a Remote to trip the shutter .

For best results change your Focus Points to only the center Focus Point. That way when you point your camera towards the bright star and center it in the viewer , when you push the shutter button down half way it should be close enough to center for the FP to detect and give you a sharp focus . Once this is done switch the lens switch back to MF and leave it there . The only thing you need to do after focusing is zoom back out to the widest FOV but like I said don't touch the Focus ring on the lens . Now you can try either way , MF or AF and which ever is easier for you then that's the way you should do . When you shoot your first image of about 20-25 secs most for a test , look at the image on the LCD screen and zoom in to see the stars good and you'll be able to see if the stars are focused or if you need to refocus again . Good luck !




  
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Dano_nav
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Jan 17, 2015 16:19 as a reply to  @ Celestron's post |  #85

Thanks so much for the tips! Just hope the clear sky continues and the weather cooperates! Thanks again!




  
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Dano_nav
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Jan 17, 2015 16:34 |  #86

Here's another one that is in focus from last night. 70mm, f2.8, ISO 1,600, 10 sec.


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Dano_nav
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Jan 17, 2015 19:44 |  #87

Tried it again tonight with I think a bit better results...


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JJ3
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Jan 17, 2015 22:02 |  #88

Here is another shot from last night. I think I captured a satellite passing just under Pleiades -- a short trail appears in each frame from this series.

Dano_nav -- I got better results when I went up to ISO 3200. Focusing was much easier when I used Live View and zoomed in 10x -- I used Jupiter as my focus point.


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Davenn
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Jan 18, 2015 00:59 |  #89

Nighthound wrote in post #17387049 (external link)
Dave, raising the black in Photoshop is done in curves by grabbing the low end handle and raising up. You'll see the background get brighter(gray). This is not what you want to rely on in post process. It's just a way to check for low end data that's still in tact and is buried in black. If the black point gets clipped in the stack or in output then data has already been lost and cannot be seen by doing what I described, or salvaged in Photoshoip. I've seen many DSS images with the black point clipped but I have no way of knowing how that came to be, by automation or operator. I don't use DSS since I'm Mac based so hopefully others can help with preventing black point clip in DSS. You'll want a somewhat deep gray background to work with in Photoshop when you stretch the image. This will assure that all low end data is in tact and not compromised or lost in excessive black. There's a temptation to raise the black point for some to hide noise, which it does but at the cost of tossing faint data and details. When I stretch an image I go very slow using curves in multiple iterations, carefully monitoring the image details across the histogram. Think of this as a marathon not a sprint, going slow will prevent any destructive adjustments.

Check this out this link as a starting point for Photoshop. Note on step 3 the image graph in Levels shows the black point not touching the left end of the graph box, this is a good thing. If the low end data is clipped that vertical black area would be slammed all the way left, same with the graph in Curves. As you stretch the image keep an eye on that area to protect the black point. Also, don't over stretch the white point either, this will bloat your stars and give them an unnatural look.
http://myastroimages.c​om …_To_Use_PhotoSh​op_Curves/ (external link)


Steve .... thanks for that and the link :)

Dave
When I use DSS I go through the steps of stacking first . Once this is completed and final results appear you will notice that at the bottom of the screen will be a Histogram for each color . You'll notice that each color will have their own individual peak . You want to adjust the peaks where all peaks cover each other and you'll notice the individual peak will turn gray as all colors cover each other . Adjust each peak the blue peak first centering the peak . Then adjust the red peak to where you just see a fine blue line of the peak in front of the red peak . Then adjust the green peak where it's on top the red peak but slightly behind . As your watching the single peak tho and you see it turn gray your trying to make the gray peak as big (wide) as possible keeping the peak as close to center as possible . I know this sounds strange but you will see what I mean when you stack images in DSS . When you accomplish this you'll start seeing your final image with some color to it but in proper way . Once your satisfied with the results then save and finish PP in PS or LR or whatever your editor is . Just remember one thing . In DSS , when your playing with the sliders for the peaks color don't check the box that allows you to move all at the same time . You need to adjust each peak individually . I hope this helps some .

some great pointers .... more text saved to my helpful hints word file :)

I ( and I'm sure, others) will appreciate your pointers guys :)
Imaging the object ... comet, nebula etc isn't my problem, it really is just my lack of skills with PP to bring out the best

Dave


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SiriusDoggy
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Jan 18, 2015 01:36 |  #90

Canon 5d Mark II, ISO 3200, 2 minute exposure, Celestron Comet Catcher 500mm f3.64 scope
01/13/15 - 6:40pm PST - Mojave National Preserve


IMAGE: http://www.siriusproductionsllc.net/photos/i-ZqNL5R4/0/X2/i-ZqNL5R4-X2.jpg

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Show us your Comet Lovejoy C/2014 Q2 images
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