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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 29 Jan 2015 (Thursday) 13:37
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Inside a camera @ 10,000 FPS

 
DanC.Licks
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Jan 30, 2015 00:41 |  #16

Interesting to see how much mirror flap there is. In film days, I worked with a Leicaflex-SL, and they had the mirror cam driven so it never banged against anything and never bounced off anything. The mirror would swing up and its speed would be controlled and reduced by the cam. You could really feel the difference between the Leicaflex and the Nikon Fs I used at the same time. I could easily hand hold 1/15- 1/30 with a 180/2.8 with the Leitz, whereas 1/60 was the absolute minimum I could manage with the Nikon.




  
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Jan 30, 2015 03:10 |  #17

Thanks, I now know more about how the shutter works, very cool!


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Paulstw
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Jan 30, 2015 03:57 |  #18

I had no idea that at 1/8000th that there would be such a thin plane between shutter blades. Amazing insight. Would be good to see the same video from a 1Dx flowing a long at 12fps and 1/8000th lol




  
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apersson850
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Jan 30, 2015 04:10 |  #19

It's pretty simple math. If shortest flash sync is at 1/250 s, then that implies that the whole 24 mm (full frame, 15 mm for a 7D) is open at that time.
For 1/500 it's half, i.e. 12 mm. Then for 1/1000 half again, i.e. 6 mm. At 1/8000, you don't get much left!


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smythie
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Jan 30, 2015 05:15 |  #20

DanC.Licks wrote in post #17406706 (external link)
Interesting to see how much mirror flap there is. In film days, I worked with a Leicaflex-SL, and they had the mirror cam driven so it never banged against anything and never bounced off anything. The mirror would swing up and its speed would be controlled and reduced by the cam. You could really feel the difference between the Leicaflex and the Nikon Fs I used at the same time. I could easily hand hold 1/15- 1/30 with a 180/2.8 with the Leitz, whereas 1/60 was the absolute minimum I could manage with the Nikon.

I could be wrong but I believe that in the Canon range the 1DX is unique in that it doesn't rely on spring return for the mirror but drives it downwards - this may reduce the amount of flapping around (I haven't seen a high speed video of the 1DX though)


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alliben
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Jan 30, 2015 07:14 |  #21

That's amazing to see what the shutter does. And even more amazing that it can go through this how many times - 100-300k?




  
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johnmac1952
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Jan 30, 2015 08:42 |  #22

Nice video of how our camera works.


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guntoter
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Jan 30, 2015 10:22 |  #23

I appreciate you posting this. I knew that this was happening, but it is nice to visually get it in your mind. I also showed another photographer who I had told about this. She was impressed to actually see it.

Thanks again.


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DigiBill
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Jan 30, 2015 10:37 |  #24

This was very interesting to view. Thanks for sharing. Now I know a little bit more about photography.


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teekay
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Jan 30, 2015 11:08 |  #25

adas wrote in post #17406566 (external link)
The mechanical shutter serves as a dust barrier.

So the only reason it's there is to prevent dust (presumably) while changing lenses? Seems an extremely complicated way just to prevent dust.

Is there a mechanical shutter on ALL interchangeable lens cameras and no mechanical shutter on ANY fixed lens cameras? (I'm talking modern digital, of course)




  
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smythie
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Jan 30, 2015 13:44 |  #26

I don't think it's that absolute. The mechanical shutter is being used to regulate exposure duration in these bodies. I suspect the dust protection comment was sarcastic


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adas
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Jan 30, 2015 16:31 |  #27

Yes, the dust protection comment was a bit sarcastic, actually the mechanical shutter produces better image quality.
The electronic shutter is actually two simultaneous sweeps across the sensor: the first sweep flushes consecutive rows of photopixels, the second sweep lags by some time interval and reads out rows of photopixels. That time interval is actually the exposure time. This arrangement pretty much resembles a mechanical shutter. The problem is that flushing the photosites is the same as shorting tiny capacitors, which produces electromagnetic interference which influences the small signal at the readout of another row that occur at the same time, adding some noise to it.
For reduced size video like HD, this may not be so much of a problem.
With the mechanical shutter, the first thing is flush all rows in the dark, then have the mechanical shutter do its thing, and finally read out all the rows, again in the dark.


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teekay
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Jan 30, 2015 18:01 |  #28

adas wrote in post #17407671 (external link)
Yes, the dust protection comment was a bit sarcastic, actually the mechanical shutter produces better image quality.....

Thanks for the detailed explanation that makes far more sense than "dust protection" - this thread has been most educational.:-)




  
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DGStinner
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Jan 30, 2015 19:53 |  #29

That was very interesting to watch. Thanks for sharing.




  
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Golden ­ Hunter
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Jan 30, 2015 23:03 |  #30

I also was surprised by the amount of mirror slap.


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Inside a camera @ 10,000 FPS
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