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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 31 Dec 2014 (Wednesday) 22:26
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Is a Canon EOS Rebel T5 a good camera to begin with to use for professional photography?

 
rrblint
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Jan 16, 2015 11:03 as a reply to  @ post 17385471 |  #91

Yeah, there's much more that can be done if you had the RAW file. That was just a 10 minute basic edit. I'll see what else I can do when I have time. BTW always shoot RAW unless you have to meet a deadline. Editing is much better with RAW.;-)a


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Jan 16, 2015 12:18 |  #92

Here is my 1 minute attempt.

Levels/Gamma adjustment for the lighting, minor hue correction, minor desaturation for the color.

Healing tool for the skin imperfections.



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Jan 17, 2015 05:59 |  #93

jessiekins wrote in post #17385453 (external link)
Rrblint:
Sorry I don't have the RAW version :(

Are you not shooting in RAW? If not, you really should be. You're missing out on the easy editing of your photos. I started out shooting JPG and after I tried RAW I never went back. If memory space on your card is an issue then you can always buy a bigger card. I have 16GB cards and can shoot 500 - 600 RAW images on one card at my greatest resolution on my 5D Mark II. That should be plenty.


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Feb 04, 2015 10:36 as a reply to  @ CameraMan's post |  #94

Hello everyone reading thank you for your advice and guidance. I decided to purchase the 50mm f/1.8 to use for portraits and I am practicing using that. I really enjoy this lens. Thank you for all the suggestions. I do find that sometimes it takes a while to focus.

And, I shoot in RAW now. I didn't for this shoot I did awhile ago. D: But, now my camera is RAW :D

Can anyone give me a quick thumb on Shutter Speed? Do you guys often change this setting? I hear many things about ISO and Aperture but never really on the shutter speed... Advice??


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Feb 04, 2015 10:50 |  #95

jessiekins wrote in post #17414965 (external link)
Hello everyone reading thank you for your advice and guidance. I decided to purchase the 50mm f/1.8 to use for portraits and I am practicing using that. I really enjoy this lens. Thank you for all the suggestions. I do find that sometimes it takes a while to focus.

And, I shoot in RAW now. I didn't for this shoot I did awhile ago. D: But, now my camera is RAW :D

Can anyone give me a quick thumb on Shutter Speed? Do you guys often change this setting? I hear many things about ISO and Aperture but never really on the shutter speed... Advice??

When hand-holding, the old chestnut is to use a shutter speed that is the reciprocal of the focal length of the lens or shorter. So for a 50mm lens, use 1/50 second or shorter. This is a very rough guide. Longer shutter speeds can be used if the lens has IS.

But if you are doing portraits, you should be using a tripod, and then you can use way slower shutter speeds.


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MalVeauX
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Feb 04, 2015 11:07 |  #96

jessiekins wrote in post #17414965 (external link)
Hello everyone reading thank you for your advice and guidance. I decided to purchase the 50mm f/1.8 to use for portraits and I am practicing using that. I really enjoy this lens. Thank you for all the suggestions. I do find that sometimes it takes a while to focus.

And, I shoot in RAW now. I didn't for this shoot I did awhile ago. D: But, now my camera is RAW :D

Can anyone give me a quick thumb on Shutter Speed? Do you guys often change this setting? I hear many things about ISO and Aperture but never really on the shutter speed... Advice??

Heya,

I shoot a lot of portrait, candid stuff. So I tend to like faster shutters, because I want to freeze the moment or the look. I also do bursts, not just one shot, because facial expressions change SO fast that you miss it most of the time unless it's posed, so I do small 3 shot bursts usually to try and get lucky with a micro-expression that is "right." Especially with kids. For me, 1/200s and faster is where I like to be. I tend to use wide aperture for depth of field control and isolation with fast primes, so I generally get a faster shutter anyways because of that (using natural light outdoors usually). When I'm in low light, I simply throw ISO up as high as it takes to keep a fast enough shutter to prevent blur (and then I simply make sure I'm exposing to the right, or gently over-exposing, by 1/3rd to 2/3rds of a stop to address the noise in RAW from the high ISO). Shutter effects exposure obviously, but shutter is also the only thing that effects motion blur or freezing of motion, so again, I like it fast enough to freeze the moment and prevent unwanted blur (both from me and the subject) and I compensate with higher ISO to ensure faster shutter. My aperture generally remains fixed wide open unless I'm doing something specific that requires me to stop down in combination with speedlites.

Very best,


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Feb 04, 2015 11:11 as a reply to  @ jessiekins's post |  #97

Have a look at this tool - http://camerasim.com/a​pps/camera-simulator (external link). It is a tool that shows you the relations between what you shoot (portrait, moving subjects, lights/shadows, etc.) and the camera settings. Very informative and fun to use.


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Feb 04, 2015 14:30 |  #98

I should add, suck it and see. You have the gear - it doesn't cost anything to shoot lots of pics. Ideas and opinions about motion blur vary a lot. Only you can answer what shutter speed is right for you.


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Feb 04, 2015 15:19 |  #99

Welcome to the Nifty Fifty! It's a unique little lens as you will find out. Did you get the first version or the 1.8 II? I've for the II version and while it sometimes has it's quirks in medium lighting it's nearly spot on in bright sunlight. I find that if I hit the button to focus about 3-4 times it will finally figure out what it's focusing on and deliver great photos.

Have fun and post some examples when you have the chance.


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Feb 04, 2015 16:17 |  #100

Archibald wrote in post #17414996 (external link)
When hand-holding, the old chestnut is to use a shutter speed that is the reciprocal of the focal length of the lens or shorter. So for a 50mm lens, use 1/50 second or shorter. This is a very rough guide. Longer shutter speeds can be used if the lens has IS.

But if you are doing portraits, you should be using a tripod, and then you can use way slower shutter speeds.

The 1/focal length rule is for full frame cameras. The 1.6 crop factor needs to be included for crop cameras. Using a tripod for portraiture is a sure way to kill spontaneity.




  
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Feb 04, 2015 17:15 |  #101

.

gonzogolf wrote in post #17415459 (external link)
The 1/focal length rule is for full frame cameras. The 1.6 crop factor needs to be included for crop cameras. Using a tripod for portraiture is a sure way to kill spontaneity.

IMO the shutter speed rule is too crude to worry about crop factors.

And re tripods, it depends on the photographer and the situation. They do kill spontaneity, but in certain situations can be very valuable. They free the photographer's hands to arrange groups, adjust lights, etc.


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Feb 04, 2015 17:56 |  #102

Heya,

I do both. I'll have a camera on a tripod and a camera free-hand, at the same time. Sometimes you just need one or the other. Low perspective for example is a lot easier on old backs when they're on a tripod, low to the ground, with a flip screen LCD!

Also, in a studio, tripods are very useful, and act as controls.

Very best,


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Feb 04, 2015 18:12 |  #103

Archibald wrote in post #17414996 (external link)
When hand-holding, the old chestnut is to use a shutter speed that is the reciprocal of the focal length of the lens or shorter. So for a 50mm lens, use 1/50 second or shorter. This is a very rough guide. Longer shutter speeds can be used if the lens has IS.

But if you are doing portraits, you should be using a tripod, and then you can use way slower shutter speeds.

That is only going to work with rigidly posed shots where the subject is told to keep very still, a sure way to end up with uninteresting shots with no spark of the subjects character in them. You talk about using the rule of thumb of 1/50th second then say you can go "way slower" on a tripod, well yes, as far as camera shake is concerned, but even at 1/50th any movement in the subject will result in blurring. Go way slower than that and the shots will all be a blurry mess.

Of course, if using strobes as the light source, the slow shutter speeds wouldn't be a problem as the flash duration (typically very short) becomes the length of time for the exposure, and will more easily freeze the subject motion. When using flash as primary light source (i.e. not as a fill in for an ambient exposure) you can ignore all those minimum shutter speeds for hand holding etc., and a tripod won't make a jot of difference.

I agree that a tripod has it's uses, but I much prefer the freedom of handholding. It makes it so simple to tweak the composition slightly if you can move around the subject looking for the best angle and light. Trying to micro manage the subject to the camera position is far more unwieldy than letting them move naturally and then move yourself to get the shot you want.

Jessiekins, to answer your question on shutter speed, yes I alter mine a lot and not just to balance exposure when changing aperture, although that is a common thing of course. I haven't read the entire thread but I assume you understand the exposure triangle and the need to balance ISO, aperture and shutter speed to get the correct exposure?

Aperture is the more common setting to prioritize for creative control, choosing a specific aperture lets you decide how much DOF you want in the image, whether shallow to lose a background or deep to keep everything sharp, or anywhere inbetween. Having chosen the aperture, you next decide on shutter speed, this can be as simple as "I need at least 1/250th second to avoid motion blur" (that figure will vary depending on how the subject is moving). You can then set the ISO needed in order to give you that shutter speed. If you shoot in Av you fix your aperture then set either a fixed ISO that will allow the shutter speed to float but is high enough that the shutter speed doesn't drop too slow (good when in strong light and using wide apertures, as you can set ISO 100 and your shutter speed will be plenty fast all day) or you can use "M with auto ISO" and set the shutter to 1/250th, letting the ISO float but keeping it as low as possible (good in low light conditions). Or you can use proper manual control and set all 3 values yourself of course.

There are times though when you need to prioritize shutter speed instead, when you want to control motion blur more than DOF. For example setting a slow shutter speed when photographing aircraft, to let the propeller become a blur, or when photographing motor sports and wanting to blur the backgrounds with panning instead of DOF. At such times you can use Tv instead of Av.

So, yes, choice of shutter speed can be simply a matter of being fast enough to freeze motion with no need to use a specific speed so long as it is sufficient. Or it can be a creative decision to use a specific shutter speed to create a certain effect, in the same way you choose a specific aperture to give you just the right amount of DOF. ISO has no significant creative input, well you can choose more or less noise I suppose, and normally you would set the lowest value that will give you the aperture and shutter speed you want / need to create the images as you want them to be.




  
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Feb 04, 2015 18:20 |  #104

sandpiper wrote in post #17415593 (external link)
That is only going to work with rigidly posed shots where the subject is told to keep very still, a sure way to end up with uninteresting shots with no spark of the subjects character in them.

The word "portrait" to me implies controlled conditions, whether in the studio or on location. A tripod has many advantages in this type of photography. I would not use a tripod for people-type of photography like candid photography, photojournalism, stage photography, etc, nor would I call this portrait photography.


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Feb 04, 2015 19:00 |  #105

Archibald wrote in post #17415609 (external link)
The word "portrait" to me implies controlled conditions, whether in the studio or on location. A tripod has many advantages in this type of photography. I would not use a tripod for people-type of photography like candid photography, photojournalism, stage photography, etc, nor would I call this portrait photography.

I did say that a tripod has some uses, but just that I preferred the freedom of not using one. The main reason for my comment about rigidly posed shots and subjects being told to keep very still, was your suggestion for using shutter speeds "way slower than 1/50th second", rather than the use of a tripod.

I agree that portrait implies controlled conditions, but it doesn't have to mean a head and shoulders shot of somebody standing stock still against a plain background. To me, a portrait is all about capturing the essence of the subject, telling the viewer something about them. This will often involve having them doing something, an artist in their studio, a writer in their study, etc. In those environs, as well as a regular photo studio, the ability to move around is, to me, important. I am not saying your way is wrong, it clearly suits you, but I don't feel that it is right to be telling people they "should be using a tripod" as if it is the only way of doing things. I never said that people shouldn't use one, I just gave a counterpoint and stated my preference.

The only part of your post I said shouldn't be followed, was the part about using such slow shutter speeds for a portrait just because the tripod will stop camera shake. It won't stop subject motion blur.




  
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Is a Canon EOS Rebel T5 a good camera to begin with to use for professional photography?
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