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FORUMS General Gear Talk Tripods, Monopods & Other Camera Support 
Thread started 07 Feb 2015 (Saturday) 15:15
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Support weight for a monopod Head

 
Hiker247
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Feb 07, 2015 15:15 |  #1

Usually when using a monopod the photographer is holding and supporting some part of the camera-lens/head/monopod combination vs the technique used with a tripod. How beefy does the head need to be? So if the camera weighs 6lbs does the head need to be rated for 6 to 8 lbs.? If not any experience of how much lighter can you get away with.




  
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Gary ­ Wiant
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Feb 07, 2015 15:55 |  #2

With the cost of camera gear i wouldn't skimp on weight if your camera weighs 6# I'd get a head that will support 6# i would be afraid to have my gear setting in a stream taking waterfall photos and have it fall over because I thought I could get away with a cheaper head.


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Voaky999
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Feb 07, 2015 16:21 |  #3

You really don't need a head on a monopod


Don
"Knowledge is Good" Emil Faber

  
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Phoenixkh
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Feb 07, 2015 17:20 |  #4

Voaky999 wrote in post #17420572 (external link)
You really don't need a head on a monopod


It might depend on what your subject is and a few other factors. I'm an older guy and I take most shots with my camera on a monopod or a tripod for added stability. Most of the time, this means I'm using my 7D2 with its grip and my 10002-400ii. I use my RRS MH-02 Pro (discontinued because the screw clamp didn't sell well) on their monopod. It's a joy to use. The only time I am shooting handheld seems to be when I'm capturing birds in flight.

I don't do any hiking in rugged terrain so that is also a factor. The trails I frequent here in Florida have gentle slopes at most. I can haul my camera bag, tripod and monopod on a Rugged Gear cart. If I was carrying it all, well.... I wouldn't be carrying it all. ;)

http://www.ruggedgear.​com/index.cfm (external link)


Kim (the male variety) Canon 1DX2 | 1D IV | 16-35 f/4 IS | 24-105 f/4 IS | 100L IS macro | 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II | 100-400Lii | 50 f/1.8 STM | Canon 1.4X III
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Hiker247
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Feb 07, 2015 20:52 |  #5

Gary, normally I would agree equipment safety over a few $ but here it's how much the Head weighs since I'm to use it on safari which has stringent weight limits, "literally every ounce counts." Don, in the safari most pix are taken off the vehicle, usually a Land Rover either with a roof that raise or no sides requiring use of a beanbag or monopod with head to be able to aim the lens without "denting" other passengers.:-D This is the basis of finding the lightest head that I can use effectively.




  
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Jon
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Feb 07, 2015 21:52 |  #6

If you're shooting from a vehicle, at land animals, you don't really need a head on your monopod. A head on a monopod is most useful when you're photographing airborne targets, so need to be wiggling your camera and lens through fairly large vertical angles. Shooting toward the horizon, not so much.


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killwilly
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Feb 08, 2015 08:54 |  #7

When I use my monopod for macro with either my Canon or Sigma lenses, I just screw the pod into the bottom of my 7D and just rock back and forth to focus, it works well and is very supportive.


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Wilt
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Post edited over 3 years ago by Wilt. (3 edits in all)
     
Feb 08, 2015 09:10 |  #8

If you think about it, the support rating for a tripod head assumes that you mounted a camera and lens on the top of it, and are letting go so that the camera is triggered by a remote/self-timer while HANDS OFF...so the rating of the head needs to cope with the camera+lens unsupported remaining 'on target'.

Yet inherently a monopod is NOT hands-off, and the camera+tripod is subjected to all of the instability of the photographer who is holding it at the top of the monopod, with only some greater constraints on the degrees of freedom of motion. A monopod is not much better than the camera being at the end of a chain which is afixed to the ground.; the monopod is more for relief of the photographer from the weight of the camera+lens, than it is for 'increased stability'


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tandemhearts
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Post edited over 3 years ago by tandemhearts.
     
Feb 08, 2015 09:17 |  #9

While I wouldn't use a ball head on monopod, something like the Manfrotto 234rc is convenient. As I think about it, i'm not sure I would want to try to adjust a ball head while balancing a monopod and a big lens. I'd worry less about official weight ratings with a monopod (and head) because most of the support and stability will come from me.




  
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Phoenixkh
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Post edited over 3 years ago by Phoenixkh.
     
Feb 08, 2015 09:19 as a reply to  @ Wilt's post |  #10

Wilt,

That's what I have always been told as well. I have found, for me a least, that I can almost balance the camera/lens on a monopod in most cases. So for me, that has been better than just handholding. My hands aren't as steady as they once were. I'm making the assumption here that you aren't a young pup, based on your years of experience, so I'm not trying to be contrary or to contradict you. You probably have far better camera holding technique than I do and your hands are likely far steadier than mine.


Kim (the male variety) Canon 1DX2 | 1D IV | 16-35 f/4 IS | 24-105 f/4 IS | 100L IS macro | 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II | 100-400Lii | 50 f/1.8 STM | Canon 1.4X III
RRS tripod and monopod | 580EXII | Cinch 1 & Loop 3 Special Edition | Editing Encouraged

  
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advaitin
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Feb 08, 2015 09:49 |  #11

http://www.kirkphoto.c​om/Kirk_MPA-2_Monopod_Head.html (external link)

or

http://www.reallyright​stuff.com …ard-screw-knob-clamp.html (external link)

I have the latter and I use it all the time. Off a raised dock toward the water, for instance. Birds stationary overhead where I have no other support available.


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Archibald
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Feb 08, 2015 10:21 |  #12

I have recently bought a Sirui P-326 monopod and Sirui L-10 monopod head. I'm still learning proper technique with it, but so far I find it to work great. I don't know what the weight rating is of the pod or head, and I don't care, because I think weight ratings for such items is silly. I'm pretty sure the assembly could take 50 lb without breaking. Anyway, I'm using it with the 7DII and 100-400II and it seems very solid and sturdy.

The monopod could indeed be used alone without any head. However, when shooting off the horizontal, I find it very useful to angle the head. This achieves a better balance with the rig.


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Wilt
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Feb 08, 2015 21:25 as a reply to  @ Phoenixkh's post |  #13

I don't disagree that the monopod helps, but it is not like completely letting go of the camera triggered with remote/self-timer. You always add inherent motion to the camera...it is not fixed at a single position in space for a long duration...it can move simply with breathing, as rifle marksmen know.


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Support weight for a monopod Head
FORUMS General Gear Talk Tripods, Monopods & Other Camera Support 
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