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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 31 Dec 2014 (Wednesday) 22:26
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Is a Canon EOS Rebel T5 a good camera to begin with to use for professional photography?

 
Archibald
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Feb 04, 2015 19:07 |  #106

sandpiper wrote in post #17415661 (external link)
I did say that a tripod has some uses, but just that I preferred the freedom of not using one. The main reason for my comment about rigidly posed shots and subjects being told to keep very still, was your suggestion for using shutter speeds "way slower than 1/50th second", rather than the use of a tripod.

I agree that portrait implies controlled conditions, but it doesn't have to mean a head and shoulders shot of somebody standing stock still against a plain background. To me, a portrait is all about capturing the essence of the subject, telling the viewer something about them. This will often involve having them doing something, an artist in their studio, a writer in their study, etc. In those environs, as well as a regular photo studio, the ability to move around is, to me, important. I am not saying your way is wrong, it clearly suits you, but I don't feel that it is right to be telling people they "should be using a tripod" as if it is the only way of doing things. I never said that people shouldn't use one, I just gave a counterpoint and stated my preference.

The only part of your post I said shouldn't be followed, was the part about using such slow shutter speeds for a portrait just because the tripod will stop camera shake. It won't stop subject motion blur.

OK, thanks, I agree with what you say!


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jessiekins
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Feb 15, 2015 14:54 as a reply to  @ Archibald's post |  #107

Thank you everyone.

New image!! This was taken off my old lens...
Do you like this black and white image? Advice? Opinions?


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Feb 15, 2015 18:04 |  #108

Heya,

I find black and white tends to be better when there's more contrast. I would push the exposure higher in RAW to get more mid-tone data, then go black and white, then push contrast hard and see what you think.

Very best,


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jessiekins
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Feb 15, 2015 18:29 |  #109

Lbsimon wrote in post #17415021 (external link)
Have a look at this tool - http://camerasim.com/a​pps/camera-simulator (external link). It is a tool that shows you the relations between what you shoot (portrait, moving subjects, lights/shadows, etc.) and the camera settings. Very informative and fun to use.

LB Simon:

That tool is awesome thank you!


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jessiekins
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Feb 15, 2015 18:30 |  #110

CameraMan wrote in post #17415363 (external link)
Welcome to the Nifty Fifty! It's a unique little lens as you will find out. Did you get the first version or the 1.8 II? I've for the II version and while it sometimes has it's quirks in medium lighting it's nearly spot on in bright sunlight. I find that if I hit the button to focus about 3-4 times it will finally figure out what it's focusing on and deliver great photos.

Have fun and post some examples when you have the chance.

Elloo yes I bought the II version. Yeah focus can be weird sometimes. Thank you.


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jessiekins
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Feb 15, 2015 18:30 |  #111

gonzogolf wrote in post #17415459 (external link)
The 1/focal length rule is for full frame cameras. The 1.6 crop factor needs to be included for crop cameras. Using a tripod for portraiture is a sure way to kill spontaneity.

Honestly I don't think I would ever use a tripod for portraits. Maybe for a sunset? Seen many photographers in Santa Monica run after the sunset on the beach with their tripods.


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jessiekins
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Feb 15, 2015 18:35 |  #112

sandpiper wrote in post #17415593 (external link)
That is only going to work with rigidly posed shots where the subject is told to keep very still, a sure way to end up with uninteresting shots with no spark of the subjects character in them. You talk about using the rule of thumb of 1/50th second then say you can go "way slower" on a tripod, well yes, as far as camera shake is concerned, but even at 1/50th any movement in the subject will result in blurring. Go way slower than that and the shots will all be a blurry mess.

Of course, if using strobes as the light source, the slow shutter speeds wouldn't be a problem as the flash duration (typically very short) becomes the length of time for the exposure, and will more easily freeze the subject motion. When using flash as primary light source (i.e. not as a fill in for an ambient exposure) you can ignore all those minimum shutter speeds for hand holding etc., and a tripod won't make a jot of difference.

I agree that a tripod has it's uses, but I much prefer the freedom of handholding. It makes it so simple to tweak the composition slightly if you can move around the subject looking for the best angle and light. Trying to micro manage the subject to the camera position is far more unwieldy than letting them move naturally and then move yourself to get the shot you want.

Jessiekins, to answer your question on shutter speed, yes I alter mine a lot and not just to balance exposure when changing aperture, although that is a common thing of course. I haven't read the entire thread but I assume you understand the exposure triangle and the need to balance ISO, aperture and shutter speed to get the correct exposure?

Aperture is the more common setting to prioritize for creative control, choosing a specific aperture lets you decide how much DOF you want in the image, whether shallow to lose a background or deep to keep everything sharp, or anywhere inbetween. Having chosen the aperture, you next decide on shutter speed, this can be as simple as "I need at least 1/250th second to avoid motion blur" (that figure will vary depending on how the subject is moving). You can then set the ISO needed in order to give you that shutter speed. If you shoot in Av you fix your aperture then set either a fixed ISO that will allow the shutter speed to float but is high enough that the shutter speed doesn't drop too slow (good when in strong light and using wide apertures, as you can set ISO 100 and your shutter speed will be plenty fast all day) or you can use "M with auto ISO" and set the shutter to 1/250th, letting the ISO float but keeping it as low as possible (good in low light conditions). Or you can use proper manual control and set all 3 values yourself of course.

There are times though when you need to prioritize shutter speed instead, when you want to control motion blur more than DOF. For example setting a slow shutter speed when photographing aircraft, to let the propeller become a blur, or when photographing motor sports and wanting to blur the backgrounds with panning instead of DOF. At such times you can use Tv instead of Av.

So, yes, choice of shutter speed can be simply a matter of being fast enough to freeze motion with no need to use a specific speed so long as it is sufficient. Or it can be a creative decision to use a specific shutter speed to create a certain effect, in the same way you choose a specific aperture to give you just the right amount of DOF. ISO has no significant creative input, well you can choose more or less noise I suppose, and normally you would set the lowest value that will give you the aperture and shutter speed you want / need to create the images as you want them to be.


Thank you for your time and in depth response I love it! I'll keep it forever. I was just confusing myself and overthinking shutter speed. I understand manual settings but I needed to learn more.


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Feb 15, 2015 21:42 |  #113

Here's my interpretation Jessica:(hope you don't mind my taking a stab at it. If you do, I'll take it down.)


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Feb 18, 2015 04:40 |  #114

Hi Jessica
Many will disagree, but if you are determined to be a pro tog. I think its worth buying a pro body and one good lens. I think a good start would be a 5D3 and a 70-200f2.8L II.

Pick one that can eventually become your backup camera ( upgrading costs are sunk costs that no new business can handle ).

As you learn your new skills you wont be limited by your kit.

As we are on the edge of a revolution in MPS terms, I personally would wait to see how the 5DS R pans out. If the reviews are very good , I would go for that, if not look at the Nikon 810.

After all your image quality will have to compete on the open market, as a relative newbie, being realistic many seasoned pros will initially be better than you technically, so the moreyou can do to use technology to close the gap the better.

IMO FLASH is terribly important.
If you go Canon, then the STE-3 controller and 3 x 600 ex rts are pretty essential.


Think also about the legal side of "holding out" yourself as a Pro. Not sure about your country, but in the UK if for example you say you are a Pro and take on a Wedding ( my advice is do not do this in the early stages ) and fluff it. You could be liable for enormous damages ( like rehiring the venue etc. to reshoot the magic day ). NB a camera or lens or lighting failure is not an acceptable defense. You need backups of everything or a second shooter ( recommended ), who has all the gear.

And good luck.


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Feb 18, 2015 11:07 |  #115

Submariner wrote in post #17437144 (external link)
Hi Jessica
Many will disagree, but if you are determined to be a pro tog. I think its worth buying a pro body and one good lens. I think a good start would be a 5D3 and a 70-200f2.8L II.

Pick one that can eventually become your backup camera ( upgrading costs are sunk costs that no new business can handle ).

As you learn your new skills you wont be limited by your kit.

As we are on the edge of a revolution in MPS terms, I personally would wait to see how the 5DS R pans out. If the reviews are very good , I would go for that, if not look at the Nikon 810.

After all your image quality will have to compete on the open market, as a relative newbie, being realistic many seasoned pros will initially be better than you technically, so the moreyou can do to use technology to close the gap the better.

IMO FLASH is terribly important.
If you go Canon, then the STE-3 controller and 3 x 600 ex rts are pretty essential.

Think also about the legal side of "holding out" yourself as a Pro. Not sure about your country, but in the UK if for example you say you are a Pro and take on a Wedding ( my advice is do not do this in the early stages ) and fluff it. You could be liable for enormous damages ( like rehiring the venue etc. to reshoot the magic day ). NB a camera or lens or lighting failure is not an acceptable defense. You need backups of everything or a second shooter ( recommended ), who has all the gear.

And good luck.

Why upgrade to a better camera if she hasn't yet figured out her current one? I'm sorry, but this is horrible advice.

I could see giving this advice if she hadn't yet owned a DSLR, but the camera she has now is perfectly capable of amazing "pro" quality portraits, so why upgrade? It makes zero difference if she upgrades now or in a year from now, her cameras value isn't going to go down by more than a couple hundred bucks, might as well use it until she's comfortable with the art and then move on when she knows why she wants/needs to.


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Feb 18, 2015 11:21 |  #116

EverydayGetaway wrote in post #17437501 (external link)
Why upgrade to a better camera if she hasn't yet figured out her current one? I'm sorry, but this is horrible advice.

I could see giving this advice if she hadn't yet owned a DSLR, but the camera she has now is perfectly capable of amazing "pro" quality portraits, so why upgrade? It makes zero difference if she upgrades now or in a year from now, her cameras value isn't going to go down by more than a couple hundred bucks, might as well use it until she's comfortable with the art and then move on when she knows why she wants/needs to.

The camera she has can indeed take pro quality pics, but it is not a camera that pros use as their primary camera.

It's a silly discussion. Go visit some pros and see what they shoot.


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Feb 18, 2015 11:33 |  #117

I was reading thru all this info and loved it. I currently have to 50D and I find myself gravitating to the T5i as a second body. A totally pro camera like 5D is way out of my reach financially and I don't ever seeing myself with that kind of money to spend on equipment so I'm sold now on the T5i. Thanks for all this info.




  
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Feb 18, 2015 12:39 as a reply to  @ Shooting's post |  #118

I would wait for the t6s (760d). It's the successor to the T5i and looks like it will be well worth the wait.


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Feb 18, 2015 18:26 |  #119

Submariner wrote in post #17437144 (external link)
Hi Jessica
Many will disagree, but if you are determined to be a pro tog. I think its worth buying a pro body and one good lens. I think a good start would be a 5D3 and a 70-200f2.8L II.

Pick one that can eventually become your backup camera ( upgrading costs are sunk costs that no new business can handle ).

As you learn your new skills you wont be limited by your kit.

As we are on the edge of a revolution in MPS terms, I personally would wait to see how the 5DS R pans out. If the reviews are very good , I would go for that, if not look at the Nikon 810.

After all your image quality will have to compete on the open market, as a relative newbie, being realistic many seasoned pros will initially be better than you technically, so the moreyou can do to use technology to close the gap the better.

IMO FLASH is terribly important.
If you go Canon, then the STE-3 controller and 3 x 600 ex rts are pretty essential.


Think also about the legal side of "holding out" yourself as a Pro. Not sure about your country, but in the UK if for example you say you are a Pro and take on a Wedding ( my advice is do not do this in the early stages ) and fluff it. You could be liable for enormous damages ( like rehiring the venue etc. to reshoot the magic day ). NB a camera or lens or lighting failure is not an acceptable defense. You need backups of everything or a second shooter ( recommended ), who has all the gear.

And good luck.

EverydayGetaway wrote in post #17437501 (external link)
Why upgrade to a better camera if she hasn't yet figured out her current one? I'm sorry, but this is horrible advice.

I could see giving this advice if she hadn't yet owned a DSLR, but the camera she has now is perfectly capable of amazing "pro" quality portraits, so why upgrade? It makes zero difference if she upgrades now or in a year from now, her cameras value isn't going to go down by more than a couple hundred bucks, might as well use it until she's comfortable with the art and then move on when she knows why she wants/needs to.

I agree with EverydayGateway. Far too many people on this forum push gear before knowledge and experience. It is understandable since for many of us, newer and shinier toys are part of the fun we have with the hobby. But, the best thing you can do is to push yourself and your current gear to the limit first. Only then, will you realize what you truly need in an upgrade (as opposed to what other people 'claim' that you need). By learning all the advantages and disadvantages your gear presents to you while in use in the way you would prefer to use them, you can then know what is important to look for in your next purchase.


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Feb 19, 2015 10:23 |  #120

So Jessie, do you live in Chicago or are you in the suburbs?


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Is a Canon EOS Rebel T5 a good camera to begin with to use for professional photography?
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