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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 31 Dec 2014 (Wednesday) 22:26
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Is a Canon EOS Rebel T5 a good camera to begin with to use for professional photography?

 
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Feb 21, 2015 08:00 as a reply to  @ post 17437629 |  #121

Yeah if you can afford it, I always get the model just before the newest one released because the price drops into a range I can afford.




  
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jessiekins
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Mar 19, 2015 09:59 |  #122

New images CC is welcomed!


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Mar 19, 2015 10:00 |  #123

Another:


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BlakeC
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Mar 19, 2015 10:11 |  #124

Beautiful dog!

The 3rd pic looks a little soft. Slightly out of focus.
The 1st and 2nd one...with the light source behind the subject, try using your flash or lifting the shadows some in post processing.


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Mar 19, 2015 10:17 |  #125

Next time try shooting from an angle we don't often look at dogs from. Try getting lower to the ground or closer to give an interesting perspective, to me those shots are technically sound, but they leave little interest in composition or subject matter.

Also, for the second and third shots I would frame differently, put the animals head more to the edge of the frame instead of the center, especially when it's looking out of the frame, generally you want your subject looking into the frame.


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jessiekins
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Mar 19, 2015 10:56 as a reply to  @ EverydayGetaway's post |  #126

Everyday Getaway:

Thank you! I would get closer but I do not own a macro lens yet... I don't know why the third image is out of focus. Any tips on getting better focused shots? I feel like I stood very still for it. My shutter was around 1600.


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Post edited over 6 years ago by BlakeC.
     
Mar 19, 2015 11:02 |  #127

jessiekins wrote in post #17482083 (external link)
Everyday Getaway:

Thank you! I would get closer but I do not own a macro lens yet... I don't know why the third image is out of focus. Any tips on getting better focused shots? I feel like I stood very still for it. My shutter was around 1600.

Dogs faces can be difficult to focus on. Mine is very difficult because there isn't much contrast in his face due to his black "mask." I usually aim at the edge of his black mask so there is plenty of contrast. I don't think speed is the issue. 1600 is plenty fast. Are you using AF One Shot? If that's the case, you may have achieved focus, then focus was locked, and by the time you pressed the shutter button, he/she moved just out of focus. You could try AI Focus or AI Servo for motion tracking. Also, are you selecting your focus point or using a zone focus mode?


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Mar 19, 2015 14:17 |  #128

Yes, I would try AI Servo with an active dog. They're undisciplined and often unwilling models. At 1/1600 you can afford to lower the shutter speed and increase the ISO in order to stop down the aperture a little. Lens choice shouldn't matter much, and don't be afraid to get in their faces if you have to.

This was wide open and wide angle, albeit while he was worn out from a long walk and dreaming of squirrels.

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Mar 19, 2015 16:33 as a reply to  @ BlakeC's post |  #129

Had it on One Shot. I will try to change these settings... didn't think of that. When I properly learn I'm sure this stuff will become cake to me! Ha. I selected the focus. It seems like the one thing I struggle with is focus :(


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Mar 19, 2015 16:38 as a reply to  @ PineBomb's post |  #130

If I lowered my shutter speed, my exposure meter would be thrown off. Raising the ISO would balance that? I do not like to throw off my exposure meter...


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Mar 19, 2015 17:09 |  #131

jessiekins wrote in post #17482083 (external link)
Everyday Getaway:

Thank you! I would get closer but I do not own a macro lens yet... I don't know why the third image is out of focus. Any tips on getting better focused shots? I feel like I stood very still for it. My shutter was around 1600.

You don't necessarily need a macro lens to get closer, in fact a macro lens would be overkill unless you were trying to get in on his eyes or some other feature. I just meant that if you get closer to the subject you can get a very different look to the image, either by using perspective distortion with a wider lens to see the dog in a different way or by getting closer with a longer lens to give you less depth of field, either one would make for a more interesting pet portrait IMO.

Just keep at it, the more you shoot the more creative you get, just don't fall into the trap of standing around and snapping like crazy. One thing I've found that helps me greatly is to mentally limit myself to a set number of exposures while I'm shooting. For instance, I'll go out with the mindset of "I'm only going to take 50 shots today" and that forces me to really think about how to make those shots keepers.

jessiekins wrote in post #17482566 (external link)
If I lowered my shutter speed, my exposure meter would be thrown off. Raising the ISO would balance that? I do not like to throw off my exposure meter...

I would highly recommend shooting with Auto ISO for now, on modern cameras it's a fantastic tool and I use it all the time.


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Mar 19, 2015 17:16 as a reply to  @ EverydayGetaway's post |  #132

What is perspective distortion?
I don't understand the wider and longer lens comment. I own a 50mm 1.8 II at the moment. The nifty fifty. I don't really know what lens you are specifically talking about... Unless it doesn't matter? A wider lens... like what? A longer lens? They're so many lenses out there.


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Post edited over 6 years ago by EverydayGetaway.
     
Mar 19, 2015 18:24 |  #133

jessiekins wrote in post #17482616 (external link)
What is perspective distortion?
I don't understand the wider and longer lens comment. I own a 50mm 1.8 II at the moment. The nifty fifty. I don't really know what lens you are specifically talking about... Unless it doesn't matter? A wider lens... like what? A longer lens? They're so many lenses out there.

Perspective distortion is the effect you get when you frame your perspective differently from what the human eye normally sees. For example, if you were to shoot with a wide angle lens like an 18mm on your T5 and shot up close to your subject the subject would sort of bulge toward the camera, this can create an interesting effect when shooting animals, it's why fisheye lenses are so fun to play around with.

This is the only example I could find of perspective distortion, shooting a dog I was house sitting for with my old X-E1, the lens would be equivalent to a 18mm f2 on your T5

IMAGE: https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3911/14902758190_eeeaebd27e_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/oGUw​NJ  (external link) DSCF5442.jpg (external link) by EverydayGetaway (external link), on Flickr

See how his nose and eyes sort of bulge toward the camera? Now, using your kit lens you could get a similar effect at 18mm, though obviously with less blur in the background.

And here's an example of using a longer lens, this was with a Minolta 58mm f1.4, similar to your 50/1.8. This was also shot around f2 so you should be able to get very similar results using your setup.

IMAGE: https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3946/15598759712_0e00acc879_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/pLpH​NY  (external link) DSCF6037.jpg (external link) by EverydayGetaway (external link), on Flickr

I would stick with the lenses you have for now, the 50/1.8 is an awesome little lens, it was one of my favorites on my T2i. I assume you also have the kit 18-55mm which again, is a pretty decent little lens. If you were to buy any lens next I would highly recommend a prime in the 28, 30 or 35mm variety. I had the old and super cheap (mine was $200) 35mm f2 from Canon on my T2i and once I got it I practically never took it off.

What I meant was that you should try getting closer and shooting with a wider aperture (like my example above) to create a little more intrigue than what we're all used to seeing since all of us look at dogs from the angles you pictured, if that makes more sense.

I really hope it doesn't seem like I'm beating on you for your shots, I'm just trying to be helpful, they aren't "bad" shots, I just think there's a lot more you could do with them creatively and believe me, I think all the same things about my own shots :lol:

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Mar 19, 2015 18:53 |  #134

I would like to give you some constructive criticism. The first two shots look like your shooting into the sun, this is why the dog seems underexposed to a degree. Where did you meter for this photo? The third photo is a little soft, a someone else has mentioned. With that being said, your composition is more snapshot-like. I think you would do well in reading a book like "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Petersen, or something along those lines. Strong backlighting is a tough egg to crack because you have to make sacrifices with your overall exposure of the frame. Don't take my writing the wrong way, just trying to help. I would start by taking pictures of some static subjects with even, controlled lighting. Try to get some nice sharp results. Then move on from there.


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Mar 19, 2015 19:21 |  #135

jessiekins wrote in post #17482566 (external link)
If I lowered my shutter speed, my exposure meter would be thrown off. Raising the ISO would balance that? I do not like to throw off my exposure meter...

What mode and setup are you using for exposure control now?

Do you fully understand how shutter speed, aperture (f-stop), and ISO all work together?


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Is a Canon EOS Rebel T5 a good camera to begin with to use for professional photography?
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
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