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Thread started 22 Feb 2015 (Sunday) 08:55
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First attempt at portraits

 
gholleman
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Feb 22, 2015 22:27 as a reply to  @ post 17444834 |  #16

Thanks for the advice. I didn't have a lot time to play with the light placement, the shoot was done last minute as a favor for a friend, so I was flying by the seat of my pants so to say. Hope to get some more time in with the equipment.




  
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nes_matt
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Feb 23, 2015 22:55 |  #17

gholleman wrote in post #17444951 (external link)
I used a single speedlight in a Westcott 26'' rapid box. The subject was 6' from the backdrop and the camera and light were 6 to 8 feet from the subject. The light was positioned about seven feet high and angled slightly downward. The light stand was placed just to my left and behind me.

for a first attempt these are great.

My advice: next time get the light up higher (coming down at 45 degress or so) and, especially for men, off to the side to unbalance the light side to side (personal taste). You might then need to put a reflector under the woman to ease the shadow under the chin and soften up the light a touch. google "clam shell lighting"


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bumpintheroad
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Feb 23, 2015 23:56 |  #18

Wow! Nevermind that it's your first attempt, these are very nicely done. Good pose, good lighting, good expression, perhaps a tad too sharp for the woman.

To take your portraits to the next level, you might try:

  • Turn the subject a little more away from the camera and have them drop their near shoulder a bit. Even more so with women as it helps narrow the shoulders.
  • Have the subject stretch his/her head towards the camera, e.g., without changing any angles, just move their chin and forehead closer. This will help smooth out the neck and accentuate the jawline, particularly in photo #1
  • I would open up the lens more and/or move the background further away to soften it up some more.

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gholleman
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Post edited over 4 years ago by gholleman.
     
Feb 24, 2015 06:15 |  #19

Thanks for the advice, very helpful.

What is the best way or angle to position the subject in relation to the camera. I struggled with this a lot trying to get these shots, some the back shoulder looked to far back and some looked to squared up, making the subjects look really wide.




  
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bumpintheroad
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Feb 24, 2015 21:09 |  #20

45 degrees is pretty standard, but unless you're shooting corporate or cookie-cutter yearbook portraits, you'll want to experiment with the angle. Women usually are at more of an angle to slim their body. With men you want a more broad-shouldered look so I normally shoot them flatter to the camera. The shoulder nearest to the camera should be dropped as you increase the angle or else it tends to look unattractively large. Find yourself some patient models and experiment with the angle to learn how it affects the result. Once you understand how it works you will easily decide how to pose any specific body type.


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trangelo
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Feb 24, 2015 22:10 |  #21

great shots. i attempted some portraits over the weekend myself.




  
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First attempt at portraits
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