Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Wildlife Talk 
Thread started 05 Jun 2014 (Thursday) 15:27
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Lens for Safari, Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda

 
Monty30
THREAD ­ STARTER
Hatchling
4 posts
Joined Jun 2014
     
Jun 29, 2014 11:54 |  #16

Thanks for sharing the photo's. Always great seeing what people have done.

I have been looking more into the 70-200 F4, my friend is willing to lend me a 1.4 Tc.
The other lens I am looking at is a sigma 120-400. These two second hand are usually under the £500 which suits my budget.

I am on a budget and deciding what to keep for the long run and what to resale is the tricky questions. My general photography when away is reportage and I always document the journey.

Out of the lens I have been looking at, I think I would use after this safari on other holidays and city breaks, 70-200 L F4 or 70-300 L F4.

GoHokiesGo wrote in post #16988489 (external link)
I'd have to echo and agree with all the advice that hollis and others have given. I went to Rwanda and Kenya back in March, and it was one of the best trips I've taken during my travels.

For Rwanda, I used the 24-105 with my 60D and that was pretty much perfect on a crop camera. I'd think that the 70-200 would be excellent on a 5D2/full frame. You could pick up the less expensive f/4 since you'll be outdoors and the 5D2 should handle slightly higher ISO without any trouble; plus it'll be easier to carry up with you on the hike to get to them. The gorilla troop we visited were out in the open on the mountainside, and I shot in mostly iso 800-1600 with good results. It was a really cool experience!
Here are my Rwanda Gorilla photos - http://jpeacott.smugmu​g.com …Rwanda-Mountain-Gorillas/ (external link)

I haven't been to the other parks in Kenya, but in Masai Mara I purchased the Sigma 150-500 OS; it worked wonderful for me, and I took ~85% of my shots with it. I actually brought my old XTi as a back-up, and I was glad I did. I kept it as a second body with my wider lenses to capture landscape shots with.
Here are some of my shots from the Mara, mostly with the 150-500:
http://jpeacott.smugmu​g.com/Travel/Masai-Mara-Kenya/ (external link)
http://jpeacott.smugmu​g.com/Travel/Masai-Mara-2/ (external link)
http://jpeacott.smugmu​g.com …asai-Mara-Kenya-Part-III/ (external link)

Regardless of what you buy - enjoy your trip! I can't wait to go back and it was one of the most incredible experiences to be in the wild with the animals in their habitats and no fences to be seen.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
CyberDyneSystems
Admin (type T-2000)
Avatar
48,408 posts
Gallery: 84 photos
Likes: 4510
Joined Apr 2003
Location: Rhode Island USA
     
Jun 29, 2014 11:58 |  #17

In Namibia and Botswana, I used a 500mm prime a lot, sometimes we T-Cons, so reach is good.

So for Zooms I would look at the 100-400mm for sure. The others to consider are as mentioned, the 500mm Sigma zooms with OS, and the new Tamron 150-600mm.

If you can get a 2nd body, I'd highly recommend it.


GEAR LIST
CDS' HOT LINKS
Jake Hegnauer Photography (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
wildstrangers
Hatchling
2 posts
Joined Dec 2014
     
Dec 21, 2014 23:09 as a reply to  @ CyberDyneSystems's post |  #18

Hi everyone,

I have a related question. I am going on a safari in Uganda and I already have a 100-400mm and 500mm lens as I am interested in birding. However, as part of this trip I'll be doing gorilla tracking. I see that most people advise the 700-200mm lens. However, with all these large lenses I'm concerned about the weight of all my gear. I'm wondering if a 24-105mm lens would be sufficient on a 7D crop body.

Thanks!


Wild Strangers Photography
www.wildstrangers.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
hollis_f
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
10,649 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 84
Joined Jul 2007
Location: Sussex, UK
     
Dec 22, 2014 05:15 |  #19

wildstrangers wrote in post #17345302 (external link)
I see that most people advise the 700-200mm lens. However, with all these large lenses I'm concerned about the weight of all my gear. I'm wondering if a 24-105mm lens would be sufficient on a 7D crop body.

I took a 100-400 for my gorilla trek. I've just checked at the majority of the images were shot between 100 and 200mm. I really think that the 24-105 will be too short.

The 70-200 f4 IS is a pretty lightweight lens and would be an excellent choice for the gorillas. I've also found it very useful on safari, for when my 300 prime is a bit too long. It weighs just a little more than the 24-105 (but feels lighter for some reason).


Frank Hollis - Retired mass spectroscopist
Give a man a fish and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he'll complain about the withdrawal of his free fish entitlement.
Gear Website (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
nqjudo
Goldmember
Avatar
2,845 posts
Likes: 812
Joined Apr 2007
Location: Canada
Post edited over 3 years ago by nqjudo.
     
Dec 22, 2014 06:22 |  #20

I think this falls into the category of you can't bring everything. No matter what you're shooting there will always be those shots you'll wish you had something else but you'll get great shots regardless. I've been on tons of safaris all over Africa and my bread and butter lens has always been the 100-400. I wouldn't go as far as calling the parks giant zoos but in most situations you are going to be shocked at just how close you will get to the animals. That is unless you are on a walking safari, in a less frequented area or outside the parks. Generally in the parks the vehicles enjoy very good access and the animals are very habituated to human and vehicle presence.

For Rwanda your choices are going to be limited by the fact that you will get, at the very best, one hour with the gorillas and you can't bring your whole kit it. You'll trek through the forest with your main guide till you meet the trackers who are about 50 metres from the gorillas. You'll then have to deposit your walking sticks, monopods, bags, etc. and then head towards the gorillas. Rules state that you can't get closer than about 20 feet but you'll see very quickly that humans don't decide this. The gorillas are in charge. A 70-200 is a good recommendation but I've often found 70mm too long on FF and swapped it out for the 24-105. If this is to be the trip of the lifetime you have to consider lighting. You could get onto the gorillas early, there could be a TON of mist and lighting is limited by the forest at the best of times. A majority of shots from my last trip were shot at ISO 10,000 or higher in misty, rainy conditions. You just never know. If you aren't confident of your camera's high ISO capabilities I'd bring along a fast prime and again, make sure it fits in you pocket or you can otherwise transport it without a bag. There was one occasion we were allowed 'small' bags. You'll find the interpretation and application of rules very dynamic in most African nations and this is very true of Rwanda.

I'd also like to issue a word of caution about advice from people who have only been to Uganda. In my experience the forest in Uganda is generally more open and allows better group viewing and the guides tend to keep you a little further away. 70-200 on FF works better here. In Rwanda you tend to get closer because the vegetation is more dense making viewing from a distance more difficult. There are even bigger differences when you get into Congo. Even though you are in the same mountain range the forests differ quite a bit in each country.

I'd like to offer some advice not related to photo gear. I haven't looked at your profile but I'm going to assume you are in the US. I'm Canadian and before the existence of the East African visa we had to apply directly to Rwandan embassies for entry visas. In the 80+ countries I've visited Rwanda accounts for the worst visa experiences I've ever had. I've waited months for visas, had my passport returned to the wrong address, had a visa issued with wrong dates and on one occasion my passport was irretrievably lost. I highly recommend that you look into an East African tourist visa which you can get through various channels - online application and on arrival in some cases. Have fun!


No photographer is as good as the simplest camera. - Edward Steichen.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
wildstrangers
Hatchling
2 posts
Joined Dec 2014
     
Dec 22, 2014 15:08 as a reply to  @ nqjudo's post |  #21

Thanks for all the quick advice! To clarify, I am Canadian but I am traveling to Uganda only (not Rwanda). It sounds like the recommendation would still be 70-200mm even with my 7D. Now I just wonder which two lenses I should keep on my 7D and 60D during the safari portion of my trip...


Wild Strangers Photography
www.wildstrangers.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
GoHokiesGo
Senior Member
Avatar
771 posts
Gallery: 5 photos
Likes: 59
Joined Feb 2007
Location: N. Virginia
     
Dec 22, 2014 21:35 as a reply to  @ wildstrangers's post |  #22

I think that everyone's experience is going to be a little different with the gorillas, since you are visiting them in their element where it's different every time. I found the 24-105 to be perfect on my 60D, as we were only a few feet from them for most of the time; however, I was mostly on the far end and would've done well with the 70-200 also. Keep in mind that you might be trekking/hiking for quite some time - my hike was fairly tough up the side of the mountain for 4-6 hours, so you dont want to lug more gear than necessary.

If you have two bodies with you on safari, put your long zoom on one and a wide to normal zoom on the other. That will let you capture the animals up close and in details, but also grab some of the spectacular landscapes too with your other body. And just like others mentioned, you'll be amazed at how close you get to the animals. They are accustomed to the vehicles being in the park and typically just completely ignore you. You definitely need more than 200mm though, like most others have mentioned that you'll spend a lot of time in the 400-600mm ranges on a safari to get those tight frames.

Enjoy it! I'm on my way back to Amboseli for new years since I enjoyed Masai Mara so much earlier this year!


~Jason
Canon 6D -¤- Canon 60D
Canon16-35 f/4L IS -¤- Canon 24-105 f/4L IS -¤- Canon 70-200 f/4L
Canon 50mm f/1.8 STM -¤- Sigma 30mm f/1.4 EX -¤- Samyang 14mm f/2.8
Travel Website - Jason Peacott Photography (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
hollis_f
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
10,649 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 84
Joined Jul 2007
Location: Sussex, UK
     
Dec 23, 2014 01:59 |  #23

GoHokiesGo wrote in post #17346881 (external link)
you dont want to lug more gear than necessary.

Which is best fixed by hiring one of the many local guys offering their services as porter. It's their main way of earning money, so it's a good way to support the local economy. And the more money the tourists bring into the area, the more likely it is that the local people will support measures aimed at gorilla conservation.


Frank Hollis - Retired mass spectroscopist
Give a man a fish and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he'll complain about the withdrawal of his free fish entitlement.
Gear Website (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Lyn2011
Senior Member
505 posts
Gallery: 124 photos
Likes: 551
Joined Dec 2011
Location: Australia
     
Dec 23, 2014 03:20 |  #24

I follow the blog of Anne McKinnell, she's been to Africa a month ago. On her blog you can find a list of gear and other info:

http://annemckinnell.c​om/blog/ (external link)




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Noirfan
Hatchling
1 post
Joined Dec 2014
     
Dec 23, 2014 12:59 |  #25

I am looking for similar advice, taking the following to Uganda: T2i, 7D, 5D3 bodies, 10-22, 24-105 f4, 100 f2.8 macro IS L, 70-200 f4 IS L. I will also be renting a long lens, either the 300 2.8 ii, or more likely the new 400 f4 DO ii just out. How loaded up with gear is acceptable for the visit with the gorillas? I have a spider belt for one body, and planned on 2 bodies on straps. I took the 300 to Kenya, and had the 1.4 on it most of the time, so thinking on the 400, which is actually smaller, lighter and cheaper than the 300. I am looking to get some close face/eyes shots with the 400 on the 5d3. I was planning to take in the 70-200, but might just take the 100 2.8 for the 7d instead, and the 2 short zooms (one in a lens pouch on my belt) for group shots with the the T2i. Is this reasonable?
Thanks!
Steve




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Gbgb
Senior Member
Avatar
391 posts
Gallery: 191 photos
Likes: 487
Joined Mar 2012
Location: Rockingham Australia
     
Dec 24, 2014 04:22 |  #26

GoHokiesGo wrote in post #17346881 (external link)
Enjoy it! I'm on my way back to Amboseli for new years since I enjoyed Masai Mara so much earlier this year!

I REALY enjoyed Amboselli. The terrain is so open, it is easy to get good shots, but as I said earlier the 100 - 400 was lacking a bit at times. I also carry 2 bodies, I have the one & my wife uses the 2nd, but soon gives it up as the times change. She's not a photog, but enjoys snapping away.

HollisF said make use of the local ppl as a porter. I cannot recommend this enough, if it is organised & you can trust the ppl. It is a great way for someone else to benefit from your holiday.


gb From GB
flickr (external link)
https://www.facebook.c​om/graham.bamber.7 (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
mesodan
Senior Member
Avatar
407 posts
Likes: 21
Joined May 2006
Location: Dubai/New Zealand
     
Feb 09, 2015 03:57 |  #27

I am off to Virunga park in DR Congo to see the mountain gorilla's in 2 weeks time.

Just trying to finalise what gear to take.

Body: 5dIII

Lenses: 70-200 f2.8 & 16-35 f2.8 II

I will probably also take a 1.4x TC. Is it worth taking along also my 300L II f2.8? Or will this unlikely be used (?).

Any help/advice appreciated:)!


5DIV | 16-35L f2.8 III | 24L II | 35L II | 50L | 85L II | 70-200L II | 300L II IS | 1.4x III | 2x III | 580EX II
www.dsw-photo.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
mesodan
Senior Member
Avatar
407 posts
Likes: 21
Joined May 2006
Location: Dubai/New Zealand
     
Mar 01, 2015 07:38 |  #28

I ended up taking the 300L and glad I did. The 300mm and f2.8 came in handy and took ~50% of my shots with it. Even took a few with the 1.4x as well. I took the 16-35L too, but only used it for trekking shots, not of the Gorllia's.

With my guide Bosko:

IMAGE: http://i.imgur.com/seGVOTK.jpg

5DIV | 16-35L f2.8 III | 24L II | 35L II | 50L | 85L II | 70-200L II | 300L II IS | 1.4x III | 2x III | 580EX II
www.dsw-photo.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Gbgb
Senior Member
Avatar
391 posts
Gallery: 191 photos
Likes: 487
Joined Mar 2012
Location: Rockingham Australia
     
Mar 01, 2015 07:45 as a reply to  @ mesodan's post |  #29

The 300 is a great lens, a friend of mine just got one. Glad you took it, I hear the gorillas can be in difficult terrain, how was it?


gb From GB
flickr (external link)
https://www.facebook.c​om/graham.bamber.7 (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
mesodan
Senior Member
Avatar
407 posts
Likes: 21
Joined May 2006
Location: Dubai/New Zealand
     
Mar 01, 2015 08:53 |  #30

The trekking wasn't too bad. Lots of stinging nettles and angry ants but luckily it wasn't too wet and the terrain not too steep. Took us about 2 hours to cover 4 kilometres in the dense vegetation/bush.


5DIV | 16-35L f2.8 III | 24L II | 35L II | 50L | 85L II | 70-200L II | 300L II IS | 1.4x III | 2x III | 580EX II
www.dsw-photo.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

7,241 views & 2 likes for this thread
Lens for Safari, Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Wildlife Talk 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is buycbdoil1
368 guests, 289 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 6430, that happened on Dec 03, 2017

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.