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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 03 Mar 2015 (Tuesday) 13:14
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Important or life changing photographs

 
LV ­ Moose
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Mar 04, 2015 10:05 |  #16

monkey44 wrote in post #17459740 (external link)
Interesting to note :: Nearly all the images stated are 'tragic' as opposed to upbeat or enlightening.

What does that say about our collective mental state? And our recognition of beauty in art?


I get your drift. But there was nothing tragic about the Berlin Wall coming down. It immediately came to mind when I read this thread, because I experienced it first-hand, as opposed to things I've seen in books or on the History Channel. It was an awesome moment in history, and one I'll never forget.


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EM3
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Mar 05, 2015 13:52 |  #17

Thanks folks these are great. Can anyone think of any others?




  
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Sparky98
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Mar 05, 2015 19:43 |  #18

Some of the pictures of the civil war dead. They may be tragic but people need to see the tragedy of that war. On a more positive note the picture of the soldier kissing the young woman at the end of WW2. Pictures of some of the women that worked during WW2, Rosie the Rivoter type. Some great sports moment.


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OhLook
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Mar 05, 2015 22:49 |  #19

The mushroom cloud, WWII.


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Mar 06, 2015 15:57 |  #20

Sailor kissing the nurse on V-J day in Times Square taken by Alfred Eisenstaedt



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jc1350
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Mar 07, 2015 17:23 |  #21

jay125 wrote in post #17463685 (external link)
Sailor kissing the nurse on V-J day in Times Square taken by Alfred Eisenstaedt

That is one of my all-time favorite photos.


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Hogloff
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Mar 07, 2015 19:09 |  #22
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monkey44 wrote in post #17459740 (external link)
Interesting to note :: Nearly all the images stated are 'tragic' as opposed to upbeat or enlightening.

What does that say about our collective mental state? And our recognition of beauty in art?

I noted the exact same thing when looking through the 2014 Jounalist top photos of the year. I'd say 90% of the subject matter are either human misery / trategy or environmental disasters. Very few were of joy and celebration.

I wonder what this really says of mankind and where we are heading.




  
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monkey44
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Mar 08, 2015 09:11 |  #23

Yes, I agree with you (hmm, again?) -- when we watch the news stations (which we're almost quit doing at our house) it shows nearly all tragedy. Hype the sensationalism -- car deaths, fires, thefts, murders, nearly all police actions, and goes on and on for days until a different one happens.

Couple reasons for this in journalism -- the locals listen to the police band and run quickly to fill the print and video slot for the evening. And, many do nothing but that ... not a lot of 'investigative' done now, and it never hits the news much.

When something 'great happens', it's hits the media ONCE - say when a new medical breakthrough happens -- then it's finished. What more does anyone say? Nothing, it falls by the wayside when something tragic happens, and the media follows that tragedy -- for example, a super-star film or an athlete OD's -- we hear about that for weeks, speculating until the real (or PR) story comes out ...

One of the scientist at the Museum of Natural History (Cape Cod branch) found evidence that humans lived on Cape Cod ten thousand years sooner than at first believed -- the scientist found a hearth and tools and dated same. Huge find, it changed American archeological history -- and it hit the news ONCE, and none of the follow up. But when the gardener killed a writer on Cape Cod, we heard about it DAILY for months and months, and followed the entire trial (every day, even when nothing new) and several books were written about it, and then got 'hyped again' when released.

Why do we like tragedy, or the better question, why does the media think we like it? Probably more likely it elicits an emotional response -- internal subconscious - that expresses happiness that it didn't happen to us, only to some other person, and if it's going to happen, better to another person than ourselves or our family. The relief that it already happened today, and we're still safe??

Not sure all this makes sense -- but I'd rather hear about a natural or creative event that brought 'wellness' into our world than watch the police spend $20,000 bucks of its budget and bust a crack addict with a match-head sized piece of dope. But, that's just me ...




  
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gjl711
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Mar 08, 2015 09:34 |  #24

I think that the sailor kissing the nurse is an excellent picture as well, but does it really qualify as a life changing or important.


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Phoenixkh
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Mar 08, 2015 09:54 |  #25

For me, there is a huge difference between "important" and "life changing". That and whose life is being considered.

I know my own life was affected the first time I got a great photograph of a Great Blue Heron. Before that, I was taking photos of flowers, trees, outdoor scenery and landscapes. That one photograph changed my life. In so many ways, this has rejuvenated my personal life. I am having more fun when I'm not working than I have in years and years. I'm out more often, taking bird and wildlife photographs as much as I can.

Of course, this hasn't changed world events or made an impact on anyone but me and my immediate family, though I suspect I'm actually a better employee as a result.

Now for a comment that is more in keeping with the intent of the OP... at least I hope so.

I came of age during the Vietnam war. The images from the war changed public opinion in the States. This was both good and bad, I think. In my view, the conflict ended more quickly than it might have. A possible unintended effect was how our soldiers ended up being treated when they returned home.

A few of us older guys will remember those days far better than the younger crowd here. I'm sure those of us who lived through those days will have varying paradigms but it's likely we can all agree, that wasn't a great time for America.


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OhLook
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Mar 08, 2015 12:07 |  #26

monkey44 wrote in post #17465704 (external link)
Why do we like tragedy, or the better question, why does the media think we like it? Probably more likely it elicits an emotional response -- internal subconscious - that expresses happiness that it didn't happen to us, only to some other person, and if it's going to happen, better to another person than ourselves or our family. The relief that it already happened today, and we're still safe??

I think it's something else. If you study fiction, you soon find that a good plot includes conflict. Stories without conflict are simply not interesting. Some forms of story are exceptions, such as those that generate interest because they're metaphors for some universal human issue or they create tension by posing a question and waiting until the end to answer it. In general, however, conflict keeps the reader turning the pages. This doesn't mean that every interesting plot has characters fighting. One way, among several others, is to pit a protagonist against a difficult task. There don't have to be good guys and bad guys, but someone has to be trying to do something.

If everything is safe and clean and normal, there's nothing to see. We expect things to be safe and clean and normal. Real-world events attract attention if they violate our expectations of good behavior and an orderly society. Stories about crimes and injustices do well on both counts. They arouse moral feelings, which may include disapproval of perpetrators and sympathy for victims. In a country that isn't at war, most people's daily lives don't include major surprises and big events that offer such sharply drawn opportunities to experience intuitions about right and wrong. We do it vicariously, using material from other people's lives.

The news has a lot of celebrity gossip. At least, online news sites are always telling me which actress is pregnant and which one is in rehab, as if I cared. It seems that many members of the public regard show-business people as larger-than-life figures or as the next thing to personal acquaintances, so the media keep reporting on entertainers, and all this reporting maintains the public's interest in entertainers.


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Mar 08, 2015 12:34 |  #27

Kent State ..... 14 yr old Mary Ann Vecchio.....



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Mar 08, 2015 13:40 |  #28

EM3 wrote in post #17458753 (external link)
From the original post.... "...Ones that changed the world or made people understand the world in a new different or significant way - which ones do you think of?..."

I think the poster is not asking about significant photos of events that happened (good or bad), but photos that, by their presentation to the world, started a change in the world. The Eddie Adams photo of the execution in Viet Nam accelerated the anti-war movement, and changed the world.


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monkey44
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Mar 08, 2015 14:27 |  #29

OhLook wrote in post #17465906 (external link)
I think it's something else. If you study fiction, you soon find that a good plot includes conflict. Stories without conflict are simply not interesting. Some forms of story are exceptions, such as those that generate interest because they're metaphors for some universal human issue or they create tension by posing a question and waiting until the end to answer it. In general, however, conflict keeps the reader turning the pages. This doesn't mean that every interesting plot has characters fighting. One way, among several others, is to pit a protagonist against a difficult task. There don't have to be good guys and bad guys, but someone has to be trying to do something.

If everything is safe and clean and normal, there's nothing to see. We expect things to be safe and clean and normal. Real-world events attract attention if they violate our expectations of good behavior and an orderly society. Stories about crimes and injustices do well on both counts. They arouse moral feelings, which may include disapproval of perpetrators and sympathy for victims. In a country that isn't at war, most people's daily lives don't include major surprises and big events that offer such sharply drawn opportunities to experience intuitions about right and wrong. We do it vicariously, using material from other people's lives.

The news has a lot of celebrity gossip. At least, online news sites are always telling me which actress is pregnant and which one is in rehab, as if I cared. It seems that many members of the public regard show-business people as larger-than-life figures or as the next thing to personal acquaintances, so the media keep reporting on entertainers, and all this reporting maintains the public's interest in entertainers.

I agree with you in general - although Fiction is Fiction and journalism is truth / history, and each quite a different animal (and I've been published in both fields) ... Fiction definitely requires conflict, or sacrifice, or overcoming aggressions, etc. -- it's why people read it. Journalism, on the other hand, happens whether we like it or not, and whether we agree with it or not ... But "the news" has become more like 'entertainment' than documenting history as it happens (unfortunately), and so it promotes other entertainers as 'news-worthy' and has slipped from it original mission.

Personally, I could care less about the 'stars' and who got who pregnant, and who slapped who in public or which politician smoked pot in college - and in fact believe most of it is made up, or made to be larger than it is with PR garbage. And, care less about the nastiness in city life as well. I enjoy films, and the stars when they are doing their jobs - entertaining - otherwise, I could care less about their personal lives - which are, as you state, larger than life, generally. But remember the greatest and best stars we hardly ever see "making news" -- Paul Newman comes to mind, Laurence Olivier -- never hit the highlights, and lived unobtrusive lives ... the 'stars' we see splashing in the news usually NEED that off-the-wall recognition because they are less astute in the 'job component' of it.

It's there, always will be, and showing it 'incidentally' on the news will never change it. Occasionally, one or another image will depict the epitome of a social injustice or momentous event - those will change lives in some demonstrable way ... unfortunately, most of those will illustrate destruction or tragedy - it's like a wake-up call to the world.

Some, of course, will illustrate success or a grand challenge overcome or achieved (Think Man first steps on the moon here) ... an amazing event, and stunning like no other achievement before its time. We need to remember too, many life-changing events have never been photographed (Columbus stepping first European foot on the North American continent (altho some believe he's not the first, and many made that journey prior to that famous 'historical' voyage. Leif Erickson (1003), for one, and we can't prove those events because no one captured it on film (or on anyway else except folks tales maybe)...

A million different news-worthy events occur every day, unfortunately, the one or two tragic events get the spotlight -- maybe changing that dynamic will change the world for the better some day. We hope.




  
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May 09, 2015 22:56 |  #30

Along with others mentioned above, here are some burned into my memory...

https://www.google.com …EM1773.aspx%3B2​361%3B3299 (external link)


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