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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Nature & Landscapes Talk 
Thread started 04 Mar 2015 (Wednesday) 18:49
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Panning markings & nodal point plates...

 
kaitlyn2004
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Mar 04, 2015 18:49 |  #1

I don't do many panoramas but I did have some questions about these two things:

Panning markings:
What are these exactly for? In what case do you choose to move by set degrees - and how much is that? I always understood to maintain some overlap between the two shots and stitch it that way?

Nodal points:
I think I understand the idea of keeping the focal point over the center of the tripod to avoid distortion when panning, but at the same time I ask in 2015 is it not incredibly easy to just adjust for this via the stitching software?

Bonus question! If I am doing a panorama and have an L plate, is there any actual reason I would NOT want do the portrait-oriented panorama?

Note: As mentioned above I do NOT do panoramas often, so I am asking not truly understanding the above :)


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Preeb
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Mar 06, 2015 23:16 |  #2

To be honest, most of my panos have been hand held. I try to overlap by 1/4 to 1/3 of the frame to give the stitching software as much to analyze and match as possible. The largest one I've done to date has 2 rows stacked with 9 images in each row in portrait orientation, 18 total. Photoshop Elements stitched it flawlessly.


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kaitlyn2004
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Mar 07, 2015 00:22 |  #3

Preeb wrote in post #17464094 (external link)
To be honest, most of my panos have been hand held. I try to overlap by 1/4 to 1/3 of the frame to give the stitching software as much to analyze and match as possible. The largest one I've done to date has 2 rows stacked with 9 images in each row in portrait orientation, 18 total. Photoshop Elements stitched it flawlessly.

Interesting! What did you shoot? And did you indeed end up printing it large or why the big pano?


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Preeb
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Mar 07, 2015 11:37 as a reply to  @ kaitlyn2004's post |  #4

I really haven't done much with it as yet. It's about a 130 degree view of the Sawtooth and Mount Bierstadt from the top of the Guanella Pass road in Colorado. The peaks are part of the 14,000 foot Mt Evans massif (Mt. Evans itself is not visible from this angle). I could have made it in a single frame using a wider zoom, but I wanted more detail. Since I use a crop body, I used my EF-S 17-55 at 55mm and took the multiple shots and stitched them to get the full view without the loss of detail that would necessarily result with a single wide exposure. I'm considering my options for printing it to hang. This is the finished image:

IMAGE: http://rapriebe.smugmug.com/photos/i-dssP2BT/0/XL/i-dssP2BT-XL.jpg

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RobDickinson
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Mar 08, 2015 19:05 |  #5

kaitlyn2004 wrote in post #17460864 (external link)
I don't do many panoramas but I did have some questions about these two things:

Panning markings:
What are these exactly for? In what case do you choose to move by set degrees - and how much is that? I always understood to maintain some overlap between the two shots and stitch it that way?

Nodal points:
I think I understand the idea of keeping the focal point over the center of the tripod to avoid distortion when panning, but at the same time I ask in 2015 is it not incredibly easy to just adjust for this via the stitching software?

Bonus question! If I am doing a panorama and have an L plate, is there any actual reason I would NOT want do the portrait-oriented panorama?

Note: As mentioned above I do NOT do panoramas often, so I am asking not truly understanding the above :)


Panning markers let you know how car each move will be. If you want 25% overrlap the number of degrees you turn the camera will be different for a 24mm lens as it will be for a 200mm lens. You can work out how many degrees you need for each focal length and use that. Many panning heads are indexed so you can set a particular value and it will 'click stop' at each point taking the guesswork out of panning and making it easier to stitch.

Nodal point - is all about parallax. If you dont rotate about the nodal point things move different amounts when you rotate the camera. So that foreground object will look like it has changed position between frames. making it very tricky (or impossible) to stitch correctly. Even good stitching software cant eaisly fix this.

Setting the nodal point correctly - there is a process to figure this out, and is easier for primes, allows you to pan (even make 360's) even with close foregroudn subjects without errors.

L plate - I always shoot my pano's in portrait orientation with an L plate.


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BearSummer
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Mar 11, 2015 16:33 as a reply to  @ RobDickinson's post |  #6

Depending on which lens you have and in which orientation you have it depends on how far you rotate it. I usually aim for between 25% and 33% so if you find out the horizontal and vertical field of views of your lenses (HFOV+VFOV) then the amount you need to turn them is 2/3 of that value

For example the 24mm lens on a full frame camera has a HFOV and a VFOV of 74° and 49°, so you would turn it 45° and 30° depending on the orientation and would get 8 or 12 frames.

Nodal Point is one of those phrases which is wrong but wont go away, it's more accurately described as "point of no parallax" which even explains what it is. As rob says, the PONP is the point about which you rotate the lens so that objects at various distance retain their positions relative to each other. So the foreground bush that is below the point of the background mountain stays there when you turn the camera right and left.

We shoot panoramas in portrait so that we get to use the long side of the frame vertically, this gives us the maximum data for the panorama within a set horizontal angle (see above 12 frames instead of 8). Why would you not shoot that orientation, well there are some guidelines for creating visual impact assessments for windfarms and solar panel arrays that specify landscape orientation (but that's a work justification), it could be that the view you want to capture works best with a landscape orientation (its 35° high so would look tiny if you shot it portrait) or there is a bright reflection that appears between 49 and 74 degrees that washes your image out. Ok im struggling to come up with a reason not to shoot portrait unless your head cant and there are a few that only do landscape. Aha, it allows you to use the hotshoe for a bubble level and not have to worry about sag when mounting the camera vertically or for a gps locator (plugs into the hotshoe and needs to be able to see the sky) and not worrying about loss of accuracy.

All the best

BearSummer


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wookiee2cu
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Apr 06, 2015 17:10 |  #7

If you are shooting landscapes and the subject is not too close it is much easier to get away with hand holding. If you are shooting cityscapes or the subject is pretty close a pano head is preferred as it will make it much easier for the software to align all the pictures... especially when there are a bunch of vertical and horizontal lines like with buildings. If you are going to shoot a single row it's not that bad but if you are going to do multi-rows then you you need to be more careful regarding the PONP "nodal point". I can be a lot of work but when they turn out it's pretty cool.




  
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Panning markings & nodal point plates...
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