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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre People Talk 
Thread started 17 Mar 2015 (Tuesday) 20:12
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Just bought a flash

 
Smitty2k1
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Mar 17, 2015 20:12 |  #1

So I've been shooting for a few years now, mostly landscapes, architecture, objects etc. I've exclusively used available light and I haven't ever found the flashes on my Rebel and 70D to work very well. Well, I bought a used Canon 530 flash and I don't know the first thing about it. My intent is to use it as a hotshoe flash on my 70D with my 17-55 f2.8 EF-S lens to take candid or somewhat staged photos of friends and family.

Does anyone have any good tips and tricks about camera and flash setup, when to use it, when not to use it, or tutorials I can look at for this application? Most information I find is related to studio work which is certainly not what I'm doing. In the past I have felt like I needed a flash when I need to crank the ISO up to 3200 or 6400 for indoor candids and am then still stuck with harsh lighting and shadows.




  
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Dave3222
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Mar 17, 2015 20:16 |  #2

Lots of good info here:
http://neilvn.com …h-photography-techniques/ (external link)
One of the best.:-)




  
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DC ­ Fan
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Mar 17, 2015 22:19 |  #3

Smitty2k1 wrote in post #17479631 (external link)
So I've been shooting for a few years now, mostly landscapes, architecture, objects etc. I've exclusively used available light and I haven't ever found the flashes on my Rebel and 70D to work very well. Well, I bought a used Canon 530 flash and I don't know the first thing about it. My intent is to use it as a hotshoe flash on my 70D with my 17-55 f2.8 EF-S lens to take candid or somewhat staged photos of friends and family.

Does anyone have any good tips and tricks about camera and flash setup, when to use it, when not to use it, or tutorials I can look at for this application? Most information I find is related to studio work which is certainly not what I'm doing. In the past I have felt like I needed a flash when I need to crank the ISO up to 3200 or 6400 for indoor candids and am then still stuck with harsh lighting and shadows.

Among the most valuable uses of EX-series Speedlites is for "fill flash," correcting the illumination of heavily backlit subjects during daytime. It's simple and effective, but a photographer needs to learn and anticipate situations where the technique is useful.


http://www.learn.usa.c​anon.com …ash_use_EOS_art​icle.shtml (external link)
http://cpn.canon-europe.com …nk/flash/fill_i​n_flash.do (external link)




  
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texkam
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Mar 18, 2015 01:13 |  #4

http://www.strobist.bl​ogspot.com/ (external link)




  
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ksbal
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Mar 19, 2015 08:45 |  #5

If you get hooked, you'll need triggers...
YN 622 will let you move that off camera, and do ettl and manual. :lol::-D


Godox/Flashpoint r2 system, plus some canon stuff.

  
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nazmo
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Mar 21, 2015 09:59 |  #6

Get the flash off camera :)
THen buy a second flash, doesnt need to be canon, maybe a third.
Then you might spend even more money on modifiers :(

Bottom line, it will add lotsa dimension to your work.
Oh, i have a 70D with a 17-50mm F2.8, and I use it for most of my work

:)

Look at my porty below. most work done with flashes


70D :: Sigma 50mm 1.4 A :: Tamron 17-50mm 2.8 :: Simga 18-35mm 1.8 A :: Sigma 50-150mm F2.8
Some of my recent work - https://www.flickr.com​/photos/119061318@N03/ (external link)
My Squarespace page - http://nrpcreations.sq​uarespace.com/ (external link)

  
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Smitty2k1
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Mar 22, 2015 00:44 |  #7

Thanks for the info so far. Really looking to keep it simple by having one lens and one on camera flash when I'm out with friends and family. If I have to help people take camera phone pics and do selfies anymore I just might lose it! However, I much prefer the snapshot/candid/in the moment type of photography vs staged.




  
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MalVeauX
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Mar 22, 2015 13:13 |  #8

Smitty2k1 wrote in post #17479631 (external link)
So I've been shooting for a few years now, mostly landscapes, architecture, objects etc. I've exclusively used available light and I haven't ever found the flashes on my Rebel and 70D to work very well. Well, I bought a used Canon 530 flash and I don't know the first thing about it. My intent is to use it as a hotshoe flash on my 70D with my 17-55 f2.8 EF-S lens to take candid or somewhat staged photos of friends and family.

Does anyone have any good tips and tricks about camera and flash setup, when to use it, when not to use it, or tutorials I can look at for this application? Most information I find is related to studio work which is certainly not what I'm doing. In the past I have felt like I needed a flash when I need to crank the ISO up to 3200 or 6400 for indoor candids and am then still stuck with harsh lighting and shadows.

Heya,

If you want to use your flash on-camera and get candids, the key is to bounce the flash--ie, don't point it at your subject, point it at something large like a wall, the ceiling, etc, that will become your light source instead. If the flash you have has ETTL capability, you're set. Just keep it in ETTL and point the flash at any surface in a room and that will become your light source. Exposure will be a cinch from there. Adjust camera settings for synch speed and aperture & ISO for depth of field and/or ambient light. Remember to keep white balance in mind, flash light is cooler than a lot of ambient light depending on time of day or where you are. You may want to pick up some inexpensive rogue gels to gel your flash to match flash to ambient white balance (this is important when mixing artificial & ambient lights). Practice by taking shots of someone candidly and see how the flash bounces and what you think. If you do not have ETTL capability, that's fine, you can chimp shots by using the flash in Manual and getting an idea of exposure. Start around 1/4th power and then adjust it from there to your exposure needs after reviewing your photo.

Very best,


My Flickr (external link) :: My Astrobin (external link)

  
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nathancarter
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Post edited over 5 years ago by nathancarter. (6 edits in all)
     
Mar 24, 2015 09:18 |  #9

Think about the flash as another leg of the exposure triangle. Instead of just ISO, shutter speed, and aperture, you now have to incorporate flash into the mix. I like to think of it as a separate exposure, completely separate from ambient/natural light exposure.

There are three important variables when it comes to flash photography:
- Flash power. You can control this manually, or by ETTL (Evaluative Through The Lens). This is just the technical term for "Let the camera decide the flash power." The camera does this by firing a very brief pre-flash right when you take the picture, a fraction of a second before opening the shutter. It compares the exposure without any flash, to the exposure with the pre-flash, and figures out about how powerful the flash should be for the actual shot - and it does all this faster than most people can perceive, after you press the shutter button but before taking the image.

- Flash distance to subject. Subjects close to the flash are going to be lit much more brightly than those far away from the flash. If you want to get technical, there's the "inverse square law" which says, if you double the distance from flash to subject, you need to quadruple the flash power to achieve the same illumination. In short, the flash will light up people in the foreground but NOT the buildings in the distance. With this in mind, you're now free to scoff and look down on those people who use a flash from the nosebleed seats at a rock concert.

- Size of flash, relative to subject. A small light source will give hard-edged shadows; a big light source will give soft-edge shadows. The closer the light source is to the subject, the bigger it is RELATIVE to the subject. The sun is pretty big, but it's also so far away that it's effectively a very small light source, so the sun makes hard-edged shadows. Most portrait photographers shoot the flash through some sort of large modifier like an umbrella or softbox; this effectively makes a large light source, which gives soft shadows which usually make fore a more pleasing portrait.


Some other considerations:
The flash is instantaneous. It doesn't matter how long your shutter speed is; the flash will always contribute the same amount of light. But, you've got to keep it slower than your flash sync speed, usually around 1/200. Any faster than that, and the timing of the rolling shutter won't line up with the flash.

With this in mind, you can adjust the balance of ambient to flash by adjusting the shutter speed. A slow shutter will let in a lot of ambient; a fast shutter will let in less ambient - but the contribution from the flash will be the same.

The aperture and ISO will affect the contribution of both flash AND ambient.


Light doesn't bend. It just doesn't, sorry, not for the purposes of photography anyway - though some marketing materials would have you believe otherwise. However, it does BOUNCE and REFLECT, which you can use kinda like bending. If you aim the flash at a wall or ceiling that's matte white, the light will bounce - the wall or ceiling become your effective light source, and they're usually pretty big relative to a person, so you can use a small Speedlight to still get a nice soft light for a nice portrait.

If you point the light at a shiny surface, it will reflect - this changes the direction of the light but not really the effective size. Bouncing off a mirror will still give you hard shadows on the subject.

The plastic caps that you stick on the end of the flash, often called "diffusers" even though they're not, don't directly make the light any softer (again, despite what the marketing materials would have you believe). Instead, they scatter the flash in every direction. This causes the light to bounce off all available surfaces, walls, ceilings, people. This light that's bounced from every direction CAN give the look of a large, soft light source, because the ceiling and walls are your light sources. But if you're outdoors, there's nowhere to bounce, so that plastic cap isn't doing you any good. Or if the ceilings and walls are black or some oddball color, then you're not going to get a desirable look from your scattered/bounced flash.

Practice, experiment, practice, read, practice.


http://www.avidchick.c​om (external link) for business stuff
http://www.facebook.co​m/VictorVoyeur (external link) for fun stuff

  
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moJoePDX
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Mar 24, 2015 23:41 |  #10

^^^ You're the man Nathan!! Thanks for the info.


|| Canon 70D || Sigma 18-35 f/1.8 || Canon 70-200mm f/2.8 L || Canon Speedlite 430 EX II ||

  
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Smitty2k1
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Mar 26, 2015 19:17 as a reply to  @ moJoePDX's post |  #11

Awesome info all thanks for all the tips!




  
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Just bought a flash
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