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FORUMS General Gear Talk Camera Vs. Camera 
Thread started 02 Jun 2015 (Tuesday) 19:30
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Trading in my 7D for a Mirrorless System

 
singer.rick
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Post edited over 3 years ago by singer.rick. (2 edits in all)
     
Jun 02, 2015 19:30 |  #1

Hello all,

Been quite a while since I have posted on here, which is partially the source of this topic anyway. Also, I'm not sure if this thread would be better in the "switching brands" sub-board, so let me know if I should move it there.

With a new job and a new fiance, I find i have much less time and energy for my photography hobby. It is still a passion of mine, but I want to try to see if I can slim down on my kit to free up some wedding funds while still leaving myself with a means of keeping my inner shutterbug happy.

I currently have a good condition 7D Mk1 with the following kit:

24-105L
Sigma 18-35 F1.8
canon 85mm f1.8
55-250
430 EX II

I have been hearing good things about how advanced mirrorless systems are getting nowadays, and wanted to see if anyone could give some guidance on whether switching to mirrorless might make sense for me.

My priorities:

Either break even or get some money back from making the switch. If I could sell all my gear and buy a new mirrorless system with lenses without spending any additional money, but be left with a smaller, easier to travel with, and less imposing setup, that would be great. If I could get some money back from the switch, even better!

Versatility. I'd like to have a decent everyday low light option (replacement for the 18-35, 24-105) and a decent DOF lense for a tighter and shallower shot (replacement for the 85), so I can still play around with those pleasant bokeh shots. A longer lens to take the place of the 55-250 would be preferable, but not 100% necessary.

Ideally I am looking for an overall decrease in size and increase in portability for my kit.

I mainly enjoy shooting landscape/wildlife on hikes and pictures of family/neices and nephews running about, etc.

I know this is a pretty vague post, but this forum has provided wonderful input to me in the past and as soon as I started my mind down this path I knew exactly where to turn to talk to a knowledgeable and helpful community about my dilemma!

Thanks in advance,

Rick


Sony A6000 | Zeiss Vario-Tessar 16-70mm f/4 OSS | Sony E 55-210mm f/4.5-6.3 | Promaster XC525 | Gear/Feedback

  
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lilkngster
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Post edited over 3 years ago by lilkngster. (2 edits in all)
     
Jun 02, 2015 21:11 |  #2

In general, switching systems with the intent to replace body with a similar sized sensor and each of your lenses ends up costing you money, a lot more money. The Canon lenses you have are cost effective for IQ compared to the APS-C equivalents from Sony, Fuji, Samsung, so you're going to have to pay more than you will get for each of your lenses.

So decide how important your sensor size needs to be: micro 4/3, APS-C, or full frame. Your lens budget will be determined by this choice, the a7II (full frame with inbody image stabilitzation) with kit lens is nearly all if not most of your budget while someone more versed than me in the m4/3 world could make appropriate recommendations in the $2k range.

So you will have to compromise somewhere with your lens lineup, either in terms of quality, focal range covered, speed of lens, and lens conveniences (stabilization/auto vs manual focus). From this a lot of people have discovered how easy it is to manual focus old film era glass, as you can get good quality/speed for a much cheaper price compared to the AF equivalents. Some photog really enjoy this, it slows you down and forces you to be involved in your shooting instead of just aim, zoom, shoot.

A few of my thoughts on a few options

1) EOS M. Used with multiple lenses/accessories are available. Ive seen kits of version 1 with 22mm pancake and the 18-55 for 3-4 hundred. Dont know if you would sell your 7d for an M, but then you get to keep all your lenses and flash. Need to install magic lantern for focus peaking. Compared to 7D, more primitive but touch screen AF, losing fps, weather sealing. Similar sensor but better processor/software in M.

2) full frame a7X from Sony. Lots of buzz. Me want one, but waiting to see how the version II for the a7R and the A7s turn out. Though, a few stories about STILL bad customer service (boom box in the 80s and a discman in the 90s, REALLY, SONY), makes me nervous. Depending on how desperate/good you are, a body and manual glass seems quite popular. I really like that it has focus peaking in the electronic viewfinder.

3) Fuji. Have an x20 but did not go down the interchangeable path for fuji.

4) Samsung. New kid on the block. Dont know much, but reviews seem favorable. Seems like they are putting in as much tech and "cool" stuff they can to get you into their system at a good price. Obviously limited native lens options.

5) m4/3. I cannot provide any useful information on this topic, though I did take a picture for a family using their Olympus.


6dII/80d/1dIII|8mm to 400mm|Pro-10/100

  
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EverydayGetaway
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Jun 02, 2015 22:24 |  #3

I would pick up a Sony a6000 before selling your 7D to see how you feel about it. Some people love mirrorless right off the bat, some hate it right off the bat, most take time to get used to it before seeing why it's quickly becoming more popular than SLRs. If you can swing it, pick up an a6000 with the kit lens and shoot with it for a few months, then make your decision.

BTW, I say a6000 because it's a great all-rounder that doesn't break the bank. There are other options out there that are just as good or better, but they cost more.


Fuji X-Pro2 // Fuji X-T1 // Fuji X-100T // XF 18mm f2 // XF 35mm f1.4 // XF 60mm f2.4 // Rokinon 12mm f2 // Rokinon 21mm f1.4 // XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 // XF 55-200mm f3.5-4.8 // Rokinon 85mm f1.4 // Zhonghi Lensturbo ii // Various adapted MF lenses
flickr (external link) // Instagram (external link)

  
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Lumens
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Jun 02, 2015 22:42 |  #4

I just picked up the Fuji Xt1 with the 18-55 & 55-200 lenses. It is likely the most affordable mirrorless that I believe fits the needs you describe. The new Xt10 is an even less expensive clone to the xt1. I find my xt1 with the 1.5 crop factor and 8 fps compares well with my 7DI only the xt1 has amazing image quality. Look into those two, I believe you won't regret it. I will be selling some Canon equipment very soon as the Fuji outperforms.


FUJI XT1 -> XF 10-24, XF 18-55, XF 55-200, XF 27mm pancake
6D -> Canon 28mm f2.8 IS, Canon 50mm f1.4, Canon 85mm f1.8, Canon 100mm f2.8 Macro IS
Canon 24-105 f4L, Canon EF 70-200 f4L IS USM, Canon EF 100-400L IS
7D -> Canon EF-S 15-85

  
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CyberDyneSystems
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Jun 02, 2015 23:24 |  #5

X-T10 will hit the streets in a matter of weeks.
I've been eyeing the X-T1, and likely would have walked out of a local store with it this week if I had not read about the upcoming X-T10, which will save me $300.00 or more. (may even drive the price of the X-T1 down a bit?)


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mafpolo
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Jun 20, 2015 11:07 |  #6

Definitely play with mirrorless first. The electronic view finder and feel of the camera is different. However, a friend of mine who is a successful fashion shooter is over the top happy with his Sony system (a7 or a7II), Sony and Zeiss lenses. I have to say...the images he sends are wow. His Canon gear is collecting dust, but he is not getting rid of it.




  
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singer.rick
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Jun 21, 2015 01:49 |  #7

So far I think my leading contender is the a6000 with 16-70, 35mm f1.8 and maybe the 55-210. Took a look at the xt1 and was very impressed but I think I want to slim down a little more than that and I don't know how I feel about all the metal dials to control things on the camera.


Sony A6000 | Zeiss Vario-Tessar 16-70mm f/4 OSS | Sony E 55-210mm f/4.5-6.3 | Promaster XC525 | Gear/Feedback

  
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killwilly
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Jun 21, 2015 03:45 |  #8

I thought I might want to change to mirroless. So, bought an EOS-M (series 1) to give it a try and whilst I did enjoy using the M, I did miss my 7D, in particular when I went on holiday/vacation earlier in the year and only took the M (to save on weight). I am currently on holiday at the moment, but have both cameras with me this time.

The one thing I miss with the M is the lack of a view finder. If in the future I buy another mirrorless camera, it will definitely have a view finder and will probably be from the Sony range.


Alan. flickr (external link)
---------------
Canon 7D. Canon 15-85 EF-S Lens. Canon 55-250 EF-S Lens. Speedlite 430ex 11.
Canon EOS-M. Canon 18-55 EF-M Lens. Speedlite 90EX.
Sigma APO 150-500mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM.

  
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singer.rick
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Jun 21, 2015 07:47 as a reply to  @ killwilly's post |  #9

A viewfinder is definitely a requirement for whatever camera I decide on.


Sony A6000 | Zeiss Vario-Tessar 16-70mm f/4 OSS | Sony E 55-210mm f/4.5-6.3 | Promaster XC525 | Gear/Feedback

  
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johnf3f
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Jun 21, 2015 17:20 |  #10

singer.rick wrote in post #17605165 (external link)
A viewfinder is definitely a requirement for whatever camera I decide on.

Do you mean an optical viewfinder? If so you may have problems with Mirrorless cameras as these normally have Electronic Viewfinders which are great for showing you where the was rather than where it is now.

I note, from your original post, that you are interested in landscape and wildlife. Over the years I have tried a number of cameras (including Sony A series) and would suggest that for landscapes and similar the mirrorless cameras have a lot going for them. Unfortunately for my wildlife uses I have found them to be pretty much useless, they are just hopelessly slow!
Try before you decide!


Life is for living, cameras are to capture it (one day I will learn how!).

  
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singer.rick
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Jun 21, 2015 17:46 as a reply to  @ johnf3f's post |  #11

Yep, electronic viewfinder is fine


Sony A6000 | Zeiss Vario-Tessar 16-70mm f/4 OSS | Sony E 55-210mm f/4.5-6.3 | Promaster XC525 | Gear/Feedback

  
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johnf3f
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Jun 21, 2015 17:52 as a reply to  @ singer.rick's post |  #12

For wildlife?????
They must be far more sedate in your neck of the woods! I don't even use IS as it slows down AF, add the delay of an electronic viewfinder and I will just watch wildlife on TV!

Anyway good luck with your decision.


Life is for living, cameras are to capture it (one day I will learn how!).

  
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05Xrunner
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Jun 22, 2015 18:17 |  #13

I will tell you i did this swap as well.
I wanted to get a smaller setup I bought the a6000 and Sony 18-105G lens after selling my old setup of 7D, 135L, and 17-50 2.8OS
the body itself pleased me. Its ISO performance was very good. its AF was very fast and accurate and the 11fps was great. it could keep up with the fastest action.
The EVF wasnt bad. The downsides was the battery. Would only last about 350-400 shots and if you go full burst once you hit the buffer the camera stops and you basically cant do anything till it clears the buffer.

but the main reason I ended up switching back because of the lens lineup. It wasnt very good especially for reach and speed. there was no 2.8 zooms and a metabones adapter is a junk solution to use say Canon lenses as the AF is useless with them. I wasnt sold on the sony adapter as well. So i decided to just go back to canon. I thought the body was fantastic just the lens choice ended up making me sell it off and come back. it would be a awesome addition to a DSLR setup but not replace it. UNLESS you are into shooting things that dont need fast zooms or alot of reach.
I wouldnt mind getting another a6000 to take for when i want a light setup to take pics with. I felt the body was a better body then the 7D


My gear
Fuji X-T2, Fuji 18-55 2.8-4 OIS, Fuji 35 f2, Fuji 56 1.2, Fuji 90 f2, Fuji 55-200 3.5-4.8 OIS
Sony RX100 II

  
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Strick
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Post edited over 3 years ago by Strick.
     
Jun 22, 2015 18:56 |  #14

I have a few Canon's, 1d IIn, 1D classic, 7D and a few others but most of the time I am more than happy to grab my Olypus E-M1 or 10. It does just about everything I can do with the Canon's except in certain action situations (like BIF) an I like the Canon better for flash work. The E-M1 keeps up with velodrome racing, dogs running, planes flying.....and yes wildlife (maybe not the super sonic type some in this thread shoot though ;) ). With the PDAF C-af it does pretty well keeping things in focus, there is a slight learning curve to it though.

The m4/3 is really a great platform and gets a bad rap from many here because it is labeled a "small sensor", it doesn't perform like one though. Small package, small glass that performs great (especially primes) and with the new collection of pro glass there are great choices in zooms as well.


www.strickphotography.​com (external link)

  
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nma
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Jun 28, 2015 19:23 |  #15

singer.rick wrote in post #17581716 (external link)
Hello all,


24-105L
Sigma 18-35 F1.8
canon 85mm f1.8
55-250
430 EX II

My priorities:

Either break even or get some money back from making the switch. If I could sell all my gear and buy a new mirrorless system with lenses without spending any additional money, but be left with a smaller, easier to travel with, and less imposing setup, that would be great. If I could get some money back from the switch, even better!

Versatility. I'd like to have a decent everyday low light option (replacement for the 18-35, 24-105) and a decent DOF lense for a tighter and shallower shot (replacement for the 85), so I can still play around with those pleasant bokeh shots. A longer lens to take the place of the 55-250 would be preferable, but not 100% necessary.

Ideally I am looking for an overall decrease in size and increase in portability for my kit.

I mainly enjoy shooting landscape/wildlife on hikes and pictures of family/neices and nephews running about, etc.

I know this is a pretty vague post, but this forum has provided wonderful input to me in the past and as soon as I started my mind down this path I knew exactly where to turn to talk to a knowledgeable and helpful community about my dilemma!

Thanks in advance,

Rick

Rick,

Your wish list could be served by the Olympus OMD E-M1, E-M5ii or the E-M5. There are deals to be had right now for the E-M5 and the Pro 12-40. See B&H for details.

As you know, the Olympus m43 line is mirrorless. With the 12-40 Pro zoom, it will run rings around the 7D and 24-105L. I know because I came from the 5Dii with 24-105, 70-200L and 16-35L. The recommended cameras have a very advanced in body stabilization system, at least a 4 stop gain. It is light and the lens are very small and light compared to the Canon L series. Believe it or not, the Pro zooms are better than anything Canon has. These cameras also offer very advanced controls, an excellent EVF and a rear tilting touch screen. Prints to at least 17x25 in are better than anything I ever did with Canon kit and the Epson 3800 printer. Oh, did I mention these bodies and the pro zooms are weather proof? The m43 cameras have a 2x crop fact, meaning higher depth of field. They require bright primes, shot wide open, to really blur your backgrounds. These primes exist and many of them are excellent and not too expensive. Another trade off is the focusing system; better faster focus for street and landscape photography, not so good for birds-in-flight and/or fast action. You should also understand the trade offs with noise in your images. Opiners on this forum will claim that the smaller sensels are always at a disadvantage to full frame and APS C cameras. Of course there is no free lunch. But you have to understand the charm of the Olympus system: The IBIS allows you to hand hold shots at very slow shutter speeds without motion blur. Thus, one gains 4-5 stops in shutter speed before you are forced to increase ISO when compared to APS C or FF without IS. Shooting at ISO 1600 is no problem at all, excellent results. ISO 3200 is OK, too; but that is the limit of good IQ. ISO 6400 is good in a pinch but not a standout. There you go. I hope this helps.




  
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Trading in my 7D for a Mirrorless System
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