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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 17 Jun 2015 (Wednesday) 21:02
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Beginner Portrait Photog Questions

 
texkam
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Jun 19, 2015 07:43 |  #16

Shooting for free or cheap devalues your work and will create the perception of you being less talented. There are plenty of pro bono causes out there where you can establish a perception of value for your talents. Letting a pro bono client know the value of a shoot helps them to understand your value if they or someone they refer you to needs paid work




  
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gonzogolf
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Jun 19, 2015 07:49 |  #17

texkam wrote in post #17603017 (external link)
Shooting for free or cheap devalues your work and will create the perception of you being less talented. There are plenty of pro bono causes out there where you can establish a perception of value for your talents. Letting a pro bono client know the value of a shoot helps them to understand your value if they or someone they refer you to needs paid work

Come on now. The OP cant figure out the terminology for the F Stop thingy and you are giving advice anout devaluing her work? At this point her work has no value and she shouldn't be charging.




  
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texkam
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Jun 19, 2015 08:20 |  #18

It is unfair to make such a statement without seeing her work. It is possible to have "the gift" without fully understanding all the technical aspects. A great eye and superb story telling ability can yield images of tremendous value. To suggest her current work has no value without seeing it is absurd, rude, and insulting.




  
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gonzogolf
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Jun 19, 2015 08:26 as a reply to  @ texkam's post |  #19

The OP has plans for a career in photography and no grounding in the basic technical skills. She might luck into some good images, but until there is a proven track record of sustained good work and technical proficiency talk about devaluing her work for future clients is premature.




  
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Colin ­ Glover
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Jun 19, 2015 08:53 |  #20

There comes a point in pro's carrier when 'experience' gets the better of them. They build their prices up bit by bit, and when newcomers come along and.undercut them they don't like it and on forums like these they'll try and gently dissuade people like me and you from setting up in business. I'm.not saying their experience counts for nothing, but what they don't want is a lot of newcomers setting up and causing prices to drop. In my area it used to cost £600 upwards for a wedding photographer to do ceremony and wedding breakfast. All day was a grand plus. The falling prices of gear meant more people could afford the equipment, and cheaper prices meant you can get a photographer for half that. If it's just ceremony and formals it's as cheap as £150. In my research I've looked at lots of portfolios from the cheapest to the expensive ones. I've seen some in my price bracket taking fantastic shots (One has a gear list like a top pro and still only charges £150, and I'm sure the pro's in his area don't like the fact that his photos are awesome). In fact most of the newcomers I've seen are really competent. DON'T worry about what they say, concentrate on on doing what you do, and in improving yourself, be it through experience or upgrading. Get a good portfolio together (free at first to get experience) and in your own time get a free website and buy a domain and redirect it to your site, like I've done. You tube is a good source of tutorials as are magazines. My wife is impressed with my improvement over the last couple of years. Look at other photographers sites for ideas too. Feel free to Pm me for advice.
Regards,
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ksbal
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Jun 19, 2015 09:17 as a reply to  @ post 17602642 |  #21

I have two lens suggestions, in addition to the fact you do need to get that flash off the camera when you can't bounce it.
1. 50 f1.8 stm
2. 85 f1.8

The above are in the bag of many advanced amateurs and pros alike.

The two lenses are both great portrait lenses that you can use close to wide open to get good background separation.

Being able to tell the camera what to do is critical.. being able to 'see the light' is priceless, and what sets the pro apart from the amateur.
Being able to post examples of your work, and let others critique them is *The Best* way to learn and grow.

From this morning, I did these two pictures. Can you figure out what I did, and how I processed them? I'd say it took me 5 years to get to this point, working a day job along with my passion. I'm still not as good as I'd like to be, posing is hard.

Tons and tons to learn... strobist.com 101 lighting is a good place to start.


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Godox/Flashpoint r2 system, plus some canon stuff.

  
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Intheswamp
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Jun 19, 2015 09:20 |  #22

A photographer that understands light will capture a great image with a Brownie 2A in decent lighting whereas someone without that understanding will struggle to take a mediocre picture in the same lighting with a $5000 kit.

Check the book thread out. Bryan Peterson's "Understanding Exposure" is a good one, but there are others, also.

x2 on the Strobist blog. Loads of good lighting information.

Purchasing a speedlight (the Yongnuos are good) and learning to bounce your light (as Dave mentioned above) will open up a new world for you...it really will. Getting the speedlight off your camera (via wireless triggers) and with an umbrella or softbox modifier will give you even more control over the lighting. MalVeaux's shopping list is a good one.

For an experiment that you can do now with your current setup... Bounce Flash with built-in flash. (external link)

The recommendations on watching youtube videos is great...very good tutorials there on portrait lighting...both artificial and natural.

Don't price yourself too cheaply "when people offer to pay me"....they'll remember later on that cheap price and might raise an eyebrow when you charge them "formally". If people pay little...they value little. People can be strange. Also, don't just count on all your friends and connections...sometime​s "friends" are good at giving lip service but when the rubber meets the road it's a different story. Not to say having those friends and acquaintances is all bad, but be working on how you will "cold sell" yourself and your skill to strangers.

Shoot images with the intent of making them look as you perceived them when you tripped the shutter.

Ed


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texkam
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Jun 19, 2015 09:51 |  #23

https://www.ownit.com …nities/ownit/po​sts/664367 (external link)

Don't be so quick to judge the value of an inexperienced shooter's work. Many can create works of value.




  
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itsallart
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Jun 19, 2015 09:55 |  #24

When I started, I only had one flash and a bunch of bouncing discs; here is a shot taken at the beginning of my semi-pro days. The setting was horrible with dappled light in the middle of the day but the flash fill bounced did a decent job.
The above suggestions about learning and understanding some basics are valid.
Happy shooting :)


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Renata
Seeing lights and shadows is an art :)
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agrandexpression
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Jun 19, 2015 10:05 |  #25

texkam wrote in post #17603045 (external link)
It is unfair to make such a statement without seeing her work. It is possible to have "the gift" without fully understanding all the technical aspects. A great eye and superb story telling ability can yield images of tremendous value. To suggest her current work has no value without seeing it is absurd, rude, and insulting.

I agree.

It's disheartening to see professionals treat newcomers with such disdain.

There's no substitute for experience - but how does someone get experience when they are told at every opportunity that they have no business doing that because they've never done that before. Why...because they might fail?

Many say failure is the best teacher.

And if you're the pro who's really just looking out for yourself - wouldn't you want someone with no experience to go out and totally flop and have them running from photography as fast as they can?




  
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ptcanon3ti
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Jun 19, 2015 10:09 |  #26

itsallart wrote in post #17603171 (external link)
When I started, I only had one flash and a bunch of bouncing discs; here is a shot taken at the beginning of my semi-pro days. The setting was horrible with dappled light in the middle of the day but the flash fill bounced did a decent job.
The above suggestions about learning and understanding some basics are valid.
Happy shooting :)
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I think thats a beautiful shot Renatta


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gonzogolf
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Jun 19, 2015 10:19 as a reply to  @ agrandexpression's post |  #27

You call my advice disdain, but try reading it with a fresh eye. The OPs aspirations are unrealistic at this point, I suggested she shoot and learn, whike others are giving business advice. If someone came on here and said they know how to make toast but want to start working as a chef you would say learn to cook first, but nobody blinks an eye when a camera is involved.




  
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itsallart
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Jun 19, 2015 10:30 as a reply to  @ ptcanon3ti's post |  #28

thank you, Paul :)


Renata
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Colin ­ Glover
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Jun 19, 2015 10:34 as a reply to  @ agrandexpression's post |  #29

Another agreement from me. I have found established pro's to be the same in protecting their business by dissuassion. Can one of you be honest and say in general, how much fees in your area in general (not your own because I'm sure yours won't.have had to drop) because of new starters undercutting the established guy's.


Canon EOS 70D, Canon EOS 600D, EF-S 18-55 ii, EF 55-200 USM ii, EF-S 75-300 iii, Tamron 28-80, Sigma 70-210. Pentax 50mm, Pentax 135mm, EF-S 55-250, Raynox Macro adapter, Neewer filters (CPL, UV, FLD & ND4), Fuji HS20 EXR (30X zoom ) & cable release, Yongnuo 560 iii & Luxon 9800A manual flashguns for the Fuji, Hama Star 63 tripod, Hongdek RC-6 remote control, Velbon DF 40 www.point-n-shoot.co.uk website.

  
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rlynphoto
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Jun 19, 2015 11:06 |  #30

This was the first time I ever used my camera. I took quite a few pictures and her mom loved them all, but this particular one was my personal favorite. I love the colors and I like the way she seems to be pondering something. I am sure it is not up to standard, I get it. I have taken several pictures of my own children since this shoot (which was two months ago) and have improved upon my focus, exposure and Lightroom editing. Now, I will be able to focus on lighting, posing, etc. so that I can improve, thanks to the wonderful feedback from everyone.


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