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FORUMS General Gear Talk Changing Camera Brands 
Thread started 26 Jul 2015 (Sunday) 03:03
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Another possible moving from Canon to Sony thread

 
Jarvis ­ Creative ­ Studios
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Jul 26, 2015 03:03 |  #1

I'll keep this short. I love Canon. I currently use a 5D3 and classic 5D with a few lenses for weddings photography. However recently I've been thinking of changing to sony. I've used the Sony a99 and a7s briefly at a few weddings and absolutely love the evf and being able to see what I'm about to get before it happens. Give me a few plus and minuses of sony v. Canon for wedding photography. I'd probably be looking into one of the smaller bodies (a7r or a7s). Not sure if I'd be changing my glass or just getting an adapter. Thanks.


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hdt4916
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Jul 27, 2015 15:28 |  #2

Hi there,

People are jumping ship to Sony because of something new in the horizon and blindly don't recognize the short comings of the mirrorless system.

Sony is the main game player intown to produce the latest sensor technology. They see the demand on the full frame camera then jumped on the bandwagon to get into the market. They don't support the pro market segment like the other 2 players. They don't keep their customer loyalty by dumping the price on the A7 by 50% value when release the new model A7 Mark II. How do you feel when they did that to your favorite camera just overnight.

Sony is not built for pro grade equipment, all the of the control buttons are so flimsy, very easy to break.

There is very limited choice when it comes to select affordable lens for Sony system. You have to pay at higher price for Zeiss lens.

I might be very stubborn on changes but I will change if Sony makes a decent system that can use either Nikon or Canon lens without limitations on AF at an affordable price. I would consider it. Otherwise, I am not in the fond of switching at the moment.

For the fast action photo shoot, you don't see Sony system in the work yet.

Good lucks,
hdt




  
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EverydayGetaway
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Jul 27, 2015 20:51 |  #3

hdt4916 wrote in post #17646410 (external link)
Hi there,

People are jumping ship to Sony because of something new in the horizon and blindly don't recognize the short comings of the mirrorless system.

Sony is the main game player intown to produce the latest sensor technology. They see the demand on the full frame camera then jumped on the bandwagon to get into the market. They don't support the pro market segment like the other 2 players. They don't keep their customer loyalty by dumping the price on the A7 by 50% value when release the new model A7 Mark II. How do you feel when they did that to your favorite camera just overnight.

Sony is not built for pro grade equipment, all the of the control buttons are so flimsy, very easy to break.

There is very limited choice when it comes to select affordable lens for Sony system. You have to pay at higher price for Zeiss lens.

I might be very stubborn on changes but I will change if Sony makes a decent system that can use either Nikon or Canon lens without limitations on AF at an affordable price. I would consider it. Otherwise, I am not in the fond of switching at the moment.

For the fast action photo shoot, you don't see Sony system in the work yet.

Good lucks,
hdt

You've clearly not shot with an a7 Camera.

Plenty of people recognize the "shortcomings" of a mirrorless system, they also greatly understand the advantages of them. All of the "shortcomings" from mirrorless bodies are diminishing year by year, it's only a short matter of time before they surpass DSLR's in every category.

Of course Sony saw the advantage of a full frame sensor, what's more mind boggling is that nobody else has done it yet in a mirrorless body. They've put out 4 bodies now and nobody else has one. I find it really funny that you think Canon or Nikon drop the old model's price by 50% when the new one comes out... not sure what market you live in, but no manufacturer does that... maybe years down the road, not within the first 2 years of release, not to mention the original a7 is still being manufactured, something my hat continues to go off to for Sony, they seem recognize that variety is a good thing for the consumer.

As for not being "pro", that entirely depends on which variety of pro you're talking about. There's absolutely nothing on my a7S that I feel is flimsy or would ever break, so idk what you're on about with that comment... in fact, I have yet to see anybody on the forums here post anything about any mechanical component on any a7 breaking.

I find it funny that you knock the a7 line for not appealing to pro's, then knock it in the very next paragraph for not having many below pro level lenses :rolleyes: Every lens they have for the a7 line is above average... some are even exceptionally good. Yes, they cost more... they also perform better, imo that's worth it. Not to mention you can use any SLR or rangefinder lens you want on it.

Your last two paragraphs also seem to ignore all the specs laid out for the a7Rii. If early reports are anywhere near accurate, it'll be a very serious contender to even the likes of the Canon 5D3 or Nikon D810.


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CamaroSS
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Jul 27, 2015 23:27 |  #4

My experience with the A7 is limited, so my opinion is formed from a perspective of instant impressions.

We know the image quality is superb, and the potential to create stellar images that can exceed the capabilities of the Canon sensor are fact. So that's out of the way.

I've been shooting professionally going on 9 years. In that time, I've only used Canon and the occasional Nikon from a friend - I didn't like them. As a professional shooter, and depending on the environment you shoot in, an SLR is a working tool that has a reputation for being reliable and supremely functional.

From this standpoint, there aren't many environments where an SLR wouldn't be the absolute best choice as your working tool. It's shortcomings are weight and size, but this is made up for by providing a build quality that has seen it survive drops from buildings, being covered in snow, drenched in rain, the list goes on. They're built to take the beating you throw at them and Canon Professional Services is there to ensure you're back out there making money again ASAP should something fail.

The layout of buttons and menus are a no fuss, get the job done style. In my comfort with Canon, I can change every setting without taking my eye off the VF, and the buttons essential for taking the shot are where they need to be for quick access. This is something that cannot be said about an A7 mirrorless camera. First, the original models had some quarky ergonomics that seem to have been mostly addressed in the latest adaptations - namely the shutter location and scroll dial.

Granted, with more seat time behind any camera you gain a familiarity, but the lack of buttons or placing them in less than desirable locations is a real issue in the field. A complaint most users would never have unless they're shooting run and gun, fast-paced subjects like sports, events, weddings, etc. The EVF isn't to my taste, but that's seems to be something you enjoy.

The smaller camera system has clear and obvious advantages over the larger SLR bodies, but I find myself looking at the complete system and asking myself if it can get all the jobs done for me. What happens when I'm at a wedding and suddenly the AF goes ape on a shot I know my SLR would nail? Would I then doubt the camera or question it? I'm sure it could handle an event just fine, but will it then work well enough with an adapted telephoto lens at a race?

For me, I shoot far too much variety in various climates. I don't really have the coin to blow on a camera that can't replace one of my cameras in my bag entirely...or begin investing in another camera system.

That said, grabbing an A72 as a spare to work alongside and gain familiarity with would be very nice. Just hard to justify when I'd rather have that new softbox, lens, case, laptop, larger budget cushion, etc....

Cameras don't suddenly begin taking bad pictures because something new and fresh comes out. I built a career off crop sensors and a "junky" 6D. If you feel it would make your job easier or improve your product, go ahead and make the jump. I don't feel it can do either of those things for me, especially when I never find myself second guessing my gear or work today...of course I want all the gear on earth though. Haha

- Kevin


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mystik610
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Jul 28, 2015 07:56 |  #5

CamaroSS wrote in post #17646887 (external link)
The layout of buttons and menus are a no fuss, get the job done style. In my comfort with Canon, I can change every setting without taking my eye off the VF, and the buttons essential for taking the shot are where they need to be for quick access. This is something that cannot be said about an A7 mirrorless camera. First, the original models had some quarky ergonomics that seem to have been mostly addressed in the latest adaptations - namely the shutter location and scroll dial.

Actually, once I had gotten used to the a7 system's button/wheel layout is actually far better when it comes to composing via the viewfinder. Despite the a7's smaller size, it has a four control wheels vs Canon's two control wheels. This means that you can quickly adjust shutter speed, aperture, ISO, and exposure compensation, as they each have their own dedicated wheels. Beyond that, you have numerous custom buttons that you can map to just about any function that you like. Given my familiarity with Canon, I mapped the custom buttons to many of the same functions as my Canon DSLR's. There's a learning curve and some set-up time on the front end, but I'd actually say that in terms of controls, Sony does a better job, despite being smaller.

In terms of composing via the viewfinder....live view goes a very long way here, as it not only gives you a preview of what the exposure will look like, you get things like zebra patterns, focus peaking, focus magnification, and levels right there in the view finder.


focalpointsphoto.com (external link) - flickr (external link) - Instagram (external link)
α7ʀII - RX1ʀII - α7ʀIII
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mystik610
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Jul 28, 2015 08:13 |  #6

Jarvis Creative Studios wrote in post #17644646 (external link)
I'll keep this short. I love Canon. I currently use a 5D3 and classic 5D with a few lenses for weddings photography. However recently I've been thinking of changing to sony. I've used the Sony a99 and a7s briefly at a few weddings and absolutely love the evf and being able to see what I'm about to get before it happens. Give me a few plus and minuses of sony v. Canon for wedding photography. I'd probably be looking into one of the smaller bodies (a7r or a7s). Not sure if I'd be changing my glass or just getting an adapter. Thanks.

Firstly, a7r or a7s may not be ideal for wedding photography unless you're particularly good at manual focus. Both the a7r and a7s are limited to contrast detect AF, which while very fast and accurate in good light, can struggle to lock in low contrast light.

The a7II or a7rII are better choices for wedding photography as they have phase detect AF systems. Only the a7rII can use phase detect AF with adapted lenses, so unless you're willing to pick up some native FE glass (and many of their lenses are very, very good BTW), that would be your best option. Either way, expect to spend some money if you want to build a wedding kit around the a7 system.

Generally the pro's of the a7 system are size/weight, IBIS (a7II or a7rII), more accurate AF, EVF (live view, focus peaking, zebra patterns etc), ability to adapt lenses (MF, unless you get a7rII), better sensor (Sony vs Canon).

Cons: about half the battery life of a DSLR (easily solved by carrying extra batteries), startup time (still very fast, but slower than DSLR), and AF speed (a7r/a7s)


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α7ʀII - RX1ʀII - α7ʀIII
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lbigdogg
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Jul 28, 2015 14:13 |  #7

I'm in the same situation. I'm really hoping I can use the a7RII to shoot events using my Canon glass, and if things go well, start to slowly switch over to Sony glass ( but I'm having a hard time getting used to the idea of relatively slow lenses for more money than the Canon equivelant). If things go well with the A7RII, the plan is to go with the A7SII and have a photography/videograph​y combo for all situations.




  
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mystik610
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Jul 28, 2015 19:34 |  #8

lbigdogg wrote in post #17647674 (external link)
I'm in the same situation. I'm really hoping I can use the a7RII to shoot events using my Canon glass, and if things go well, start to slowly switch over to Sony glass ( but I'm having a hard time getting used to the idea of relatively slow lenses for more money than the Canon equivelant). If things go well with the A7RII, the plan is to go with the A7SII and have a photography/videograph​y combo for all situations.

The native primes are usually 1/3-2/3 slower than their Canon equivalents, but they are optically very good. Optically better than their Canon equivalents is most cases.


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maxblack
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Jul 28, 2015 20:24 |  #9

The biggest thing to consider is service.
Although not an A7 model, my Sony RX1-r's
Mode dial croaked after 110 actuations.
Sony doesn't service their own stuff, it's
outsourced here in the U.S.
I love the Sony camera when it's working,
but Canon Service rules if your livelihood relies on it.
Just my 2 cents.



  
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Jul 28, 2015 22:31 |  #10

mystik610 wrote in post #17647215 (external link)
Actually, once I had gotten used to the a7 system's button/wheel layout is actually far better when it comes to composing via the viewfinder. Despite the a7's smaller size, it has a four control wheels vs Canon's two control wheels. This means that you can quickly adjust shutter speed, aperture, ISO, and exposure compensation, as they each have their own dedicated wheels. Beyond that, you have numerous custom buttons that you can map to just about any function that you like. Given my familiarity with Canon, I mapped the custom buttons to many of the same functions as my Canon DSLR's. There's a learning curve and some set-up time on the front end, but I'd actually say that in terms of controls, Sony does a better job, despite being smaller.

In terms of composing via the viewfinder....live view goes a very long way here, as it not only gives you a preview of what the exposure will look like, you get things like zebra patterns, focus peaking, focus magnification, and levels right there in the view finder.

I like that Sony basically appears to have looked at the Canon and Nikon controls systems and just asked "Why not both?". What I still don't like about the controls, even after well over a year of getting accustomed to them, is that while they work well when the cameras are mounted to a tripod everything is just way too cramped to be comfortable when handheld. If the A7 bodies were about an inch wider and taller then the situation would be greatly improved, although this is not a problem unique to Sony.


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mystik610
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Jul 29, 2015 13:17 |  #11

raptor3x wrote in post #17648165 (external link)
I like that Sony basically appears to have looked at the Canon and Nikon controls systems and just asked "Why not both?". What I still don't like about the controls, even after well over a year of getting accustomed to them, is that while they work well when the cameras are mounted to a tripod everything is just way too cramped to be comfortable when handheld. If the A7 bodies were about an inch wider and taller then the situation would be greatly improved, although this is not a problem unique to Sony.

Yeah...they improved upon a it a bit with the a7II by moving the shutter to the grip and making the grip larger, but it can still feel a bit crowded. That's the downside to a smaller body, but Sony makes good use of the surface area they have to work with.


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α7ʀII - RX1ʀII - α7ʀIII
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EverydayGetaway
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Jul 29, 2015 15:14 |  #12

mystik610 wrote in post #17648921 (external link)
Yeah...they improved upon a it a bit with the a7II by moving the shutter to the grip and making the grip larger, but it can still feel a bit crowded. That's the downside to a smaller body, but Sony makes good use of the surface area they have to work with.

It all depends on the user. I actually prefer the a7S layout, it makes shooting from the hip or down low very natural by using your thumb for the shutter.


Fuji X-Pro2 // Fuji X-T1 // Fuji X-100T // XF 18mm f2 // XF 35mm f1.4 // XF 60mm f2.4 // Rokinon 12mm f2 // Rokinon 21mm f1.4 // XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 // XF 55-200mm f3.5-4.8 // Rokinon 85mm f1.4 // Zhonghi Lensturbo ii // Various adapted MF lenses
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Shadowblade
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Jul 29, 2015 22:26 |  #13

There are quite a number of wedding photographers around Melbourne who have switched completely to Sony, particularly the A7s and A7II combination (but, in the near future, also considering the A7rII now that the AF issues with the first A7r model have been solved). They're finding that the AF is more than fast enough for their work, as well as being very accurate, that the real-time exposure simulation of the EVF is a godsend and that the additional DR has been useful in high contrast situations (black tux/white dress, plus Australian sunlight for outdoor shoots).

With regards to size, the Sonys are a bit on the small side, but I find the opposite problem with full-size Canon and Nikon bodies (1Dx/D4s series particularly) - the grips are just too big to get a secure grip on them, so most of the support comes from holding the lens in the other hand, and the size causes a lot of hand strain. Given a choice between the two sizes, I'd take the smaller one - at least I'm not going to drop it.




  
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Jarvis ­ Creative ­ Studios
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Jul 29, 2015 23:54 as a reply to  @ mystik610's post |  #14

Thank you. I'm not only limiting my options to the smaller bodies. I shouldn't have said I preferred them over the a99. The 99 actually felt far more familiar since all i've shot with are the larger pro bodies from Canon. I've been reading about the a992 release and it's been quite intriguing. It does look like it will come with a price tag that will make the switch a bit harder though haha.


WEBSITE (external link)
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Sony HX90V || Sony RX100V || Sony a6500 || Sony a9 || Sony E 10-18mm f/4 OSS || Sony FE 24-70 f/2.8 GM || Sony Sonnar T* FE 35mm f/2.8 ZA || Sony Sonnar T* FE 55mm f1.8 ZA || Sony FE 70-200 f/2.8 GM OSS || Godox speedlights and strobes

  
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Jarvis ­ Creative ­ Studios
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Jul 29, 2015 23:57 as a reply to  @ mystik610's post |  #15

I was wondering if it got cramped on the body. I have large hands. So large, in fact, that I have always used a battery grip on my Canon's just because it is more comfortable to hold. A gripped 5D3 is the perfect size for my hand.


WEBSITE (external link)
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Sony HX90V || Sony RX100V || Sony a6500 || Sony a9 || Sony E 10-18mm f/4 OSS || Sony FE 24-70 f/2.8 GM || Sony Sonnar T* FE 35mm f/2.8 ZA || Sony Sonnar T* FE 55mm f1.8 ZA || Sony FE 70-200 f/2.8 GM OSS || Godox speedlights and strobes

  
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Another possible moving from Canon to Sony thread
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