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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 26 Jan 2013 (Saturday) 10:20
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A New Bare Bulb Flash Arrives

 
mmmfotografie
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Sep 05, 2015 11:57 as a reply to  @ post 17695929 |  #6076

And then you arrive at the people like me that reduce light coming in by fitting a CPL or ND filter.

When used correctly this is most efficient way to use the power in the battery.




  
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idkdc
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Sep 05, 2015 12:01 |  #6077

mmmfotografie wrote in post #17695974 (external link)
And then you arrive at the people like me that reduce light coming in by fitting a CPL or ND filter.

When used correctly this is most efficient way to use the power in the battery.

What nd filter do you prefer?


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Echo63
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Sep 05, 2015 12:08 |  #6078

idkdc wrote in post #17695977 (external link)
What nd filter do you prefer?

one strong enough to keep the SS at sync speed and open the aperture enough to get the selected DOF

assuming 1/250@f11 in full sun, a 5 stop ND will get you down to f2.8
if you are shooting with a Noctilux wide open on a Monochrom - a big stopper might be a good start.


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CheetahStand
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Post edited over 4 years ago by CheetahStand.
     
Sep 06, 2015 14:20 |  #6079

Ulysses01 wrote in post #17695008 (external link)
Quick question to the group about the Cells II-N. I'm sorry if this has been discussed in this thread already. I performed a search but didn't find anything specific about it.

Does the CL-360 always need to be set to full power (1/1) in order for the Cells II-N to work effectively without any black banding?

I just received my Cells II-N a couple days ago and am now testing it with a Nikon D4S. Unless I'm missing something important, I'm finding that any power level below 1/2 +0.7 will create blackened area at least half-way down the frame. Lower power levels produce almost complete blackness down the frame.

I've got plenty of experience with the CL-360, but this is my first time actually using a Cells II-N unit and trying to make sure I use it correctly before bringing it out in the field on a real job.

NOTE: As instructed later in this thread, I did NOT set the CL-360 in HSS mode. Any suggestions or confirmations would be appreciated. :)



You can do HSS by using "M"
https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=Xvu8bgGBUS4 (external link)


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Ulysses01
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Post edited over 4 years ago by Ulysses01.
     
Sep 06, 2015 19:52 |  #6080

CheetahStand wrote in post #17697104 (external link)
You can do HSS by using "M"
https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=1Ovr6V4L3cc (external link)

Thank you very much, Edward and CheetahStand Team! I was actually about to let the forum know about your new video, but you beat me to it (of course!). This new video explains better than the older version about using the Cells II.

What had me confused before is that I thought maybe we could use power levels below 1/1. But your explanation to keep the flash at FULL POWER agrees with my observation and answers exactly what I've been asking about.

I can confirm that your method does work with the Nikon D4S. When you get up to the higher speeds, there is a little bit of unevenness across the frame, but I think it would be easily adjusted during processing.


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dmward
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Post edited over 4 years ago by dmward.
     
Sep 06, 2015 22:33 |  #6081

It appears that this has to be repeated from time to time since this thread has been going for so long.
The Cheetah/Godox lights use IGBT circuitry for power control. Its the same power control used in speedlites.
It controls output by opening the circuit to the flash tube based on power setting. The objective is to keep the capacitor(s) as close to full as possible.

At full power, the flash duration is long enough for the shutter to travel across the sensor plan (about the X-sync shutter speed) Thus, the slit at the beginning of its travel gets some light, and the slit at the end of it travel gets about the same amount of light. The result is a uniform exposure. This technique works well outside because the ambient light "hides" the black strip caused by over speeding the shutter.

The reason its necessary to use a trigger such as the Cheetah Cells II(c/n) is to signal to the camera that an FP sync supporting light is in the hot shoe. FP sync tells the flash to fire before the shutter curtain begins to travel. The reason its used for High Speed Sync is so that the speedlite can be fired in a pulsing mode that emulates the old FP flash bulbs that had a flat burn that lasted long enough for the focal plane shutter to traverse the film plane. Since the power in the capacitor has to be expended of a longer period of time, the maximum luminosity at a point in time is less.

That is also why there is the heat protection feature built into the Cheetah Lights. By definition, each exposure using H mode expends all the power stored in the capacitor(s). They then have to fully recharge and the next shot is fired. Doing that too rapidly causes a dangerous heat build up.

H mode is a useful tool. Using it effectively requires knowledge and experience. i.e. Practice.


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CheetahStand
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Sep 07, 2015 09:26 |  #6082

Ulysses01 wrote in post #17697441 (external link)
Thank you very much, Edward and CheetahStand Team! I was actually about to let the forum know about your new video, but you beat me to it (of course!). This new video explains better than the older version about using the Cells II.

What had me confused before is that I thought maybe we could use power levels below 1/1. But your explanation to keep the flash at FULL POWER agrees with my observation and answers exactly what I've been asking about.

I can confirm that your method does work with the Nikon D4S. When you get up to the higher speeds, there is a little bit of unevenness across the frame, but I think it would be easily adjusted during processing.

thumbnail
Hosted photo: posted by Ulysses01 in
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forum: Flash and Studio Lighting

The video:
https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=Xvu8bgGBUS4 (external link)


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dmward
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Sep 07, 2015 09:40 |  #6083

Ulysses01 wrote in post #17697441 (external link)
... When you get up to the higher speeds, there is a little bit of unevenness across the frame, but I think it would be easily adjusted during processing.


The reason for the unevenness is that a strobe has a an early peak of output and then a tail that tapper to no output over time. The flash duration times quoted by manufactures is either t.5 or t.1. T.5 is the time from beginning until 50% of the total output. T.1 is until 90% of the total output. (10% remaining.)

Since the shutter slit is narrower at higher shutter speeds, there is less time for the light to reach the sensor and the light being offered is farther down the tail of the flash duration and thus less. This combines to cause the gradation.

I've found that the gradation can be easily accommodated in Lightroom using the gradian tool. Pull it from the dim edge of the frame to the bright edge, then apply the exposure compensation. At highest shutter speeds pulling it all the way across works best. at slower speeds it may be necessary to pull it only part way across.


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Left ­ Handed ­ Brisket
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Sep 07, 2015 09:47 |  #6084

Ed, does the thermal protection kick in strictly due to heat generated - or - strictly due to the mode/power/number of pops?

or is it some combination of the two?


PSA: The above post may contain sarcasm, reply at your own risk | Not in gear database: Auto Sears 50mm 2.0 / 3x CL-360, Nikon SB-28, SunPak auto 322 D, Minolta 20

  
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mmmfotografie
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Sep 07, 2015 10:35 as a reply to  @ Left Handed Brisket's post |  #6085

I am not Ed but topic was already covered however due to the popularity of this thread it is lost in words.

So try using a single port of the batterypack and when the protection kicks in because of the heat switch the cable to the free port and then you have your answer.




  
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Sep 07, 2015 22:15 as a reply to  @ mmmfotografie's post |  #6086

some brain cell that might just be barely holding on to life is telling me that there are thermal sensors in each battery port AND the flash head. It is also saying that the battery is more likely to stop the action than the flash head.


PSA: The above post may contain sarcasm, reply at your own risk | Not in gear database: Auto Sears 50mm 2.0 / 3x CL-360, Nikon SB-28, SunPak auto 322 D, Minolta 20

  
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Sep 10, 2015 15:20 |  #6087

what kind of bag do you use to transport these lights? Pics would be awesome


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Sep 10, 2015 15:53 as a reply to  @ yamatama's post |  #6088

Not a bag...


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Sep 10, 2015 18:13 |  #6089

Drk Orange wrote in post #17702544 (external link)
Not a bag...


QUOTED IMAGE

Looks good


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Sep 10, 2015 18:17 |  #6090

Pretty much any bag they will fit it


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