Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Wildlife Talk 
Thread started 17 Oct 2015 (Saturday) 12:28
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Canon 760D for wildlife photography

 
Rich_C
Junior Member
21 posts
Joined May 2006
Location: Ilfracombe
     
Oct 17, 2015 12:28 |  #1

Hi looking for some advice would the following camera be ok for deer photography with the 100-400 mkii lens. Very reluctant to go with 70D or 7d mkii due to (some focusing problems,) which my friend has with his 70D, reason being I can not handle stress very well

Many Thanks for help




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
RikWriter
Goldmember
Avatar
3,939 posts
Gallery: 81 photos
Likes: 846
Joined May 2004
Location: Lakeland, FL
     
Oct 18, 2015 11:50 |  #2

What does your friend's focusing problem with a 70D have to do with a 7D MKII?


My pics:
www.pbase.com/rikwrite​r (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
MalVeauX
"Looks rough and well used"
Avatar
13,404 posts
Gallery: 1737 photos
Best ofs: 4
Likes: 10997
Joined Feb 2013
Location: Florida
     
Oct 18, 2015 12:11 |  #3

Rich_C wrote in post #17749235 (external link)
Hi looking for some advice would the following camera be ok for deer photography with the 100-400 mkii lens. Very reluctant to go with 70D or 7d mkii due to (some focusing problems,) which my friend has with his 70D, reason being I can not handle stress very well

Many Thanks for help

Heya,

It'll work. Probably not ideal. But it will work.

70D and 7D2 are superior in every way. There shouldn't be any focus problems with the 400 MKII with them, other than the rogue/fluke chance which maybe your friend encountered. The beauty is you can try the pairing and if it's not to your liking return it--no stress.

I'd frankly go for a used 7D over the 760D, if nothing else, for the FPS and aggressive AF. If you're shooting still deer in a field from a blind, you can use anything frankly (especially from a tripod). But if your'e trying to capture some action, like bucks doing their thing, or some running, FPS really can help grab the moments that cannot be timed, by simply getting most of it.

Very best,


My Flickr (external link) :: My Astrobin (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Tom ­ Reichner
"I am a little creepy"
Avatar
13,979 posts
Gallery: 149 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 4087
Joined Dec 2008
Location: Omak, in north-central Washington state, USA
     
Oct 18, 2015 20:25 |  #4

What's a 760D ? Some kind of Rebel or something? If so, is there a way to name it in a way that people will understand, such as T2i or whatever?

Anyway, is there some reason that you would expect fewer focusing problems with this 760D than you would expect with a 70D or a 7D2?


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Philihase
Member
201 posts
Gallery: 52 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 559
Joined Dec 2013
Location: Giessen Germany
     
Oct 25, 2015 01:08 as a reply to  @ Tom Reichner's post |  #5

Whats a Rebel? Is it some kind of 760D or something? If so, is there a way to name it in a way the rest of the world apart from N.America and Japan (Kiss) will understand? ;-)a


https://www.facebook.c​om …e-Photos-852961268075109/ (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Tom ­ Reichner
"I am a little creepy"
Avatar
13,979 posts
Gallery: 149 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 4087
Joined Dec 2008
Location: Omak, in north-central Washington state, USA
Post edited over 4 years ago by Tom Reichner with reason 'separated into two paragraphs.'.
     
Oct 25, 2015 02:20 |  #6

Philihase wrote in post #17759140 (external link)
Whats a Rebel? Is it some kind of 760D or something? If so, is there a way to name it in a way the rest of the world apart from N.America and Japan (Kiss) will understand? ;-)a

The OP already named it in a way that the rest of the world will understand. Hence, the request to provide us with its other name.

We already know it is a 760D. What else is it called?


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Rooivalk
Junior Member
Avatar
25 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Aug 2008
Location: South Africa
     
Oct 27, 2015 04:22 |  #7

I used a Canon 760D(T6S) on a Canon 400F5.6L recently in the Kruger National Park for 2weeks.I came back with awesome shots.The biggest misconseption is when photographers say a cameras frame rate is too slow.Its all about learning animal behaviour and anticipating the moments.Any photographer can take pictures of a lion yawning firing at 8fps.But its boring looking through 30 frames to get the right one.It makes photographers lazy.


Canon 50D,Canon 760D,Canon 400 F5.6 L,Tamron 150-600mm G2,Canon 50 F1.8 STM, Sigma 17-70,Sigma EF-610 DG Super flash,Velbon Sherpa 600Rf Tripod,FRAM GIMBAL HEAD,Raynox DCR-250 Macro lens!

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
RikWriter
Goldmember
Avatar
3,939 posts
Gallery: 81 photos
Likes: 846
Joined May 2004
Location: Lakeland, FL
     
Oct 27, 2015 05:02 |  #8

Rooivalk wrote in post #17761762 (external link)
I used a Canon 760D(T6S) on a Canon 400F5.6L recently in the Kruger National Park for 2weeks.I came back with awesome shots.The biggest misconseption is when photographers say a cameras frame rate is too slow.Its all about learning animal behaviour and anticipating the moments.Any photographer can take pictures of a lion yawning firing at 8fps.But its boring looking through 30 frames to get the right one.It makes photographers lazy.


That's far too broad a generalization.


My pics:
www.pbase.com/rikwrite​r (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Tom ­ Reichner
"I am a little creepy"
Avatar
13,979 posts
Gallery: 149 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 4087
Joined Dec 2008
Location: Omak, in north-central Washington state, USA
Post edited over 4 years ago by Tom Reichner.
     
Oct 27, 2015 12:24 |  #9

You're right, Rik.

There are times when an animal is basically stationary when a high frame rate is not very helpful. But there are many other times when the critters are moving quickly and a camera with a rapid frame rate is very helpful. Why so? Well, often the photographer's goal is not simply to get that one great shot; rather, the goal is often to get as many unique frames as possible. If a buck deer is running and I am shooting him as he runs, ideally I would like about 10 frames in which he is in perfect focus and his legs are in aesthetically pleasing and/or dramatic positions. And of course, each one of those 10 "money" shots has to be different enough from all of the others so that I can market them to different agencies and not run the risk losing first rights due to violating "similar image" clauses in their contracts with me.

I speak this from experience; I shot with a 50D as my main body for 3 1/2 years (6 fps). When I switched over to a 1D Mk4 (10fps), I was surprised at how many additional unique frames I would get from each opportunity. I got a lot of really good, marketable wildlife images with the 50D.....I get even more with the 1D Mk4. With fast action it does matter.

The people who always claim that slow frame rates are just fine (for wildlife/sports) are usually going to be happy with only one really nice shot from each brief opportunity. If that's the case, then a camera with a slower frame rate will be excellent for your purposes.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
alliben
Senior Member
Avatar
304 posts
Gallery: 36 photos
Likes: 157
Joined Apr 2011
     
Oct 29, 2015 07:23 |  #10

I'm glad I replaced my Rebel with the 70D. It's a better camera and plays well with my 100-400 ver2. I believe you're mistaken if you think that the chances of getting a faulty 70D body are greater than getting a faulty 760D body. No matter what body, you test at home and return it if it's bad. When it's time to upgrade, I won't go back to the Rebel class. This raven turned in the air so quickly that I don't think I could have just picked the right time for a single shot. As you know, deer can move quickly too.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
johnf3f
Goldmember
Avatar
4,091 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 653
Joined Apr 2010
Location: Wales
     
Oct 29, 2015 18:20 |  #11

I agree with Tom.
The frame rate you need is all down to what you are trying to achieve. For example one frame per second is more than enough if I am shooting a perched Kingfisher, if I am trying to catch a moment when the Kingfisher is stunning a fish then my max of 12 fps is rather slow!
For Deer, most of the time I don't need a particularly high frame rate but If I am trying to catch a good image of them rutting then the higher the better. If you are trying to capture a particular moment and the action is likely to get hot then go for the higher fps cameras, if not then go for the best IQ (with reasonable fps) that is within your budget.


Life is for living, cameras are to capture it (one day I will learn how!).

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

4,664 views & 7 likes for this thread
Canon 760D for wildlife photography
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Wildlife Talk 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is CoolGuy5Million
1129 guests, 294 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.