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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 20 Dec 2015 (Sunday) 04:57
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50l portrait looks more natural than 85l

 
arheo
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Dec 20, 2015 04:57 |  #1

i want to buy lens for portrait.
first, i was planinig to buy canon 85L, because its reputation, best of the best portrait lens.
BUT, when i looking sample photos maked with 50l and 85l at flick or similar web sites, portrait made with 50L look more natural, more film look.
photos with 85L is so much pop, so clean, sharp, contrast.

Is that just a postprocessing or there a really difference between this two lenses.

i allredy have 35L and that is a reasson why i first think to buy 85L.


Canon 6D, 17-40L, 24-105L, 35L, 85/1.8, 200L

  
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DoughnutPhoto
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Dec 20, 2015 05:31 |  #2

Why don't you rent the lenses? It's really hard to say anything of value about the postprocessing of photos on Flickr.


Canon 5d, 60d, 17-40mm L, 30mm Art, 50mm, 85mm

  
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BigAl007
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Dec 20, 2015 10:52 |  #3

The real questions should really be what sort of portraits do you want to take, full body, half length, head and shoulders? How much room do you have to shoot in? Really you need to be at least 10 to 12 feet from the subject, to avoid perspective distortion. I would much rather shoot at about 15 feet if I could. You then need to choose a focal length that will allow you to frame the subject in the manner that you want. This is especially true in the studio, where the available distance can be quite restrictive. In that case it may be that you will have to compromise and use a shorter FL so that you can frame the longer shots. Then if you need to do a tight head and shoulders shot you will need to crop the image to get the desired framing. This is a situation where you want to avoid getting closer to fill the frame, as the closer shot would introduce perspective distortion. Remember that it is ONLY the relative placement of the various parts of the image, in relation to the camera, that cause the distortion. NOT the focal length of the lens.

If you are shooting outdoors in a situation where you have room to back up some, then using a longer lens is not such an issue. You have the option for getting a tight head shot from a normal distance, and still have the opportunity to back up to a much greater distance for the full length shot. The increased distance involved gives a much flatter looking image, with considerably more background blur thanks to the changes in perspective.

So only once you know what you will be shooting, and from where can you really decide what lens you need to use. If you try to pick the lens first it will be dictating to you how you want to take your images.

Alan


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Copidosoma
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Dec 20, 2015 11:42 |  #4

arheo wrote in post #17825602 (external link)
i want to buy lens for portrait.
first, i was planinig to buy canon 85L, because its reputation, best of the best portrait lens.
BUT, when i looking sample photos maked with 50l and 85l at flick or similar web sites, portrait made with 50L look more natural, more film look.
photos with 85L is so much pop, so clean, sharp, contrast.

Is that just a postprocessing or there a really difference between this two lenses.

i allredy have 35L and that is a reasson why i first think to buy 85L.


You are making some very subjective judgments of other people's images. Frankly, it is very difficult to tell if that is a matter of light, post processing, the lens, other techniques etc.

As above, the best way to really tell for sure if to use the two lenses. Or just try to not overthink it.

Also, you can take a sharp, contrasty, clean image and reduce all of those things. It is much harder (impossible really) to go the other way.


Gear: 7DII | 6D | Fuji X100s |Sigma 24A, 50A, 150-600C |24-105L |Samyang 14 2.8|Tamron 90mm f2.8 |and some other stuff
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arheo
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Dec 21, 2015 01:50 |  #5

yea, i know, its very subjectiv, and it is not good comparasion, but in some way 85L photos that i seen looks more clinical if you know what i mean...i am almost decide to buy this lens, but i when look examples 50L photos looks more pleasant, more magic...that is maybe because of differnet focal lenght, perspective, ....or it is differnd rendering.

I would buy 50L, but allredy have 35L so i think that with 85 i ll have more usefull combination.


Canon 6D, 17-40L, 24-105L, 35L, 85/1.8, 200L

  
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BigAl007
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Dec 21, 2015 02:10 |  #6

arheo wrote in post #17826647 (external link)
yea, i know, its very subjectiv, and it is not good comparasion, but in some way 85L photos that i seen looks more clinical if you know what i mean...i am almost decide to buy this lens, but i when look examples 50L photos looks more pleasant, more magic...that is maybe because of differnet focal lenght, perspective, ....or it is differnd rendering.

I would buy 50L, but allredy have 35L so i think that with 85 i ll have more usefull combination.

Lenses neither have nor produce perspective. Perspective is simply due to relative positioning of components of the scene, and the camera. If you shoot from the same location using both 50mm and 100mm lenses, and crop the image from the 50mm lens by 50% you will end up with basically the same image, with identical perspective. However if you move the camera back and forth to keep the framing the same there will be a significant difference in perspective. Since in the first instance the perspective did not change, it shows that the change in perspective in the second case is due to the change in location.

Alan


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fordmondeo
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Dec 21, 2015 04:22 |  #7

What about canons perspective control lenses?

The 50L does not have a floating lens element and suffers from focus shift.


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90c4
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Dec 21, 2015 20:50 |  #8

You already have the 85 1.8 - what about it don't you like for portraits. If it's the focal length, you've answered your question. Personally, I didn't like the 50L and sold it for the 50 1.4. I'd be more inclined to get a Sigma than Canon 50L


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KingRoach
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Dec 22, 2015 06:31 |  #9

Here my opinion on your original post on top:

You view portraits online and thought the 50mm ones look more "natural".

First, you have not actually seen the model in life to determine that portrait of them looks more natural, or true-to-life, or proportionally or compressionally correct, or call it what you wish.

Second, when considering "natural", especially when viewing images online, we have to remember that certain things get "naturalised" or "normalised". I think this applies to levels of compression or distortion (distoriton beoming a norm to look at thank to mobile phones' wide lenses, for example). So what is "more natural" cannot be seen by viewing samples.

Please note that my comment is not personal, but is an opinion regarding your method, and the implications of the presuppositions in it. I simply want to call out the presuppositions in order to help, so don't take my response personally please. :)

It may be worth renting both and doing a photoshoot on a model you are familiar with to make your own mind. It may also be worth considering your own signature style and look and proximity factor and stuff, and factor all that into which lens suits you better.


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vengence
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Dec 22, 2015 07:45 |  #10

Something to note when viewing photos on the internet. You can only judge the maximum potential of a lens by looking at photos. That is, with the very best post processing, the very best technique, and a good example of the lens, you'll find the best photos. Anything less than the best must be taken with a grain of salt as it could either be poor post processing, poor technique (too slow shutter speed, missing focus, etc), or it could be the lens its self. It's almost impossible to say when judging photos on the internet which is which. As others have recommended, there's no substitute for using a lens for your self. Two people can rent the same exact two lenses and each come away wanting a different lens because of their shooting style, preferences, or even techniques.




  
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JeffreyG
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Dec 22, 2015 08:19 |  #11

fordmondeo wrote in post #17826698 (external link)
The 50L does not have a floating lens element and suffers from focus shift.

The focus shift is probably the most overrated problem that any lens ever had. It really only can be forced to happen at ranges below 1m focus distance, and even then it is really subtle. I use the 50L all the time, and focus shift is a complete non-issue for me.


As for the rest of this discussion, who knows. Maybe the OP just 'sees' things better with the AOV of a 50mm lens, and so the images other photographers have made with their 50mm lenses appeal to him more. If you shoot a bunch of portraits with a 50mm lens and then shoot a bunch at the same framing using an 85mm lens, the 50mm set will tend to be shot closer, will show more of the background, and will have a bit of a different look.


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AlanU
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Dec 22, 2015 09:33 |  #12

arheo wrote in post #17826647 (external link)
yea, i know, its very subjectiv, and it is not good comparasion, but in some way 85L photos that i seen looks more clinical if you know what i mean...i am almost decide to buy this lens, but i when look examples 50L photos looks more pleasant, more magic...that is maybe because of differnet focal lenght, perspective, ....or it is differnd rendering.

I would buy 50L, but allredy have 35L so i think that with 85 i ll have more usefull combination.

I'd suggest testing a Sigma Art series 50mm. It sure doesn't have a red ring around it but the micro contrast presents a different look compared to the aging 50L. While your analysing :) you'll find the new fresh lenses from canon have a new signature look regarding sharpness.

Go ahead and test a 16-35Lmk2 f/2.8 and test the "newer" 16-35 f/4 IS. The fresh canon lens has a totally different look regarding sharpness. Much more micro contrast in the f/4 IS UWA lens.

I do not own a ART 50mm but I'd choose that look over the 50L since I seldom ever use f/1.2. Virtually all copies I've used and tested would catch me off guard due to my style of shooting and I'd get focus shift messing my shots. Since I am not a fan of the 50mm FL I'm just keeping my Canon f/1.4 for giggles. My 85Lmk2 is nice to have but for run/gun shooting in events and family documentation the look of the 70-200 f/2.8mk2 has more micro contrast than the 85L prime.

Depending on your shooting style you shouldn't be shooting f/1.2 portraits up close due to shallow dof.

85L and 85 f/1.8 are both susceptible to purple fringing. If your 85 f/1.8 is a good copy you'll capture more "moments" compared to the pig slow AF in the 85Lmk2. If you use f/2 to f/2.2 with the f/1.8 prime you'll still get some PF but the f/1.8 is extremely fast in the AF speed.

I love the 35L but I'd take the sigma art 35mm if your going to be ultra critical in pixel peeping and want more modern looking micro contrast. Both lenses look great on print.

The best photo's taken with my 85Lmk2 was with my 5d classic. The organic look was incredible. However the 5dmk2 and 5dmk3 ruined it with the razor sharpness digital non organic look. oh well.......... still looks good in 300 dpi print.


5Dmkiv |5Dmkiii | 24LmkII | 35mm f/2 IS | 85 mkII L | | 16-35L mkII | 24-70 f/2.8L mkii| 70-200 f/2.8 ISL mkII| 600EX-RT x2 | 580 EX II x2 | Einstein's
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mcluckie
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Dec 22, 2015 09:46 |  #13

In the studio, I think you'd be better off with 85mm or longer. For most other situations, the 50 suits me better.

The 50L may be creamy, and I had 2 copies, but for less money, I love the 50 Milvus MUCH better. It's razor sharp and buttery. 35 isn't always that close to 50 in different uses and there's so much more than angle of view in choosing lenses.


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Dec 22, 2015 09:47 |  #14

fordmondeo wrote in post #17826698 (external link)
What about canons perspective control lenses?

Well perspective control lenses don't even have an intrinsic perspective of their own. They do though have adjustments that allow you to control some of the unwanted effects of perspective when they might otherwise occur. By using shift and tilt adjustments for example you can photograph a tall building and correct the converging verticals that would otherwise be introduced by tilting the film/sensor plane away from vertical. Another use is to take a picture of a mirror without including the camera's reflection. These lenses cannot though be used to change the effect of distance on the resulting image.

Alan


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n1as
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Dec 22, 2015 14:49 |  #15

Woa, wait - 50+ yrs of the photography industry knowing that 85mm (on full-frame) is a better portrait lens than 50mm and we've been wrong.

Whoda thunk it! :lol:

OP, I suggest you do a bit more research to try to isolate what it is about the 50mm images that you prefer. Is it the perspective, the DOF, the contrast, the lighting, composition? So much goes into a photograph and often the differences between lenses gets completely masked by the other features.


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50l portrait looks more natural than 85l
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