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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Architecture, Real-Estate & Buildings Talk 
Thread started 22 Jan 2016 (Friday) 14:20
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Marketing Interior Photography

 
mltn
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Post edited over 4 years ago by mltn.
     
Jan 22, 2016 14:20 |  #1

I'm gathering info in preparation of a marketing push to architects, interior designers, renovators, contractors, or basically any person or entity in need of high-end interior photographs. I have a Houzz.com profile, so I think this is the appropriate place to start.

Does anyone else have experience using Houzz to find new clients? How do you differentiate you and your services from that of your competition?

My first instinct was to find people who had bad photography on their existing projects, because obviously I could offer a major improvement. On the other hand, these people may just not care that the photos suck, and not be willing to shell out much or any money to have them done well.

Any thoughts are appreciated!




  
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markd61
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Jan 22, 2016 23:58 |  #2

I have no experience in using Houzz to find clients. It seems that it is a site that gets a lot of Pinterest type viewers. Homeowners looking for designers and contractors and not peripheral professionals.

I spend a lot of time marketing directly to realtors, architects, designers and in-house sales teams at country clubs.

MEET WITH PEOPLE. Do not drop off flyers. You will only get the price buyers who are looking for someone at the last minute.

When you create a relationship you get someone who is predisposed to you already as they are reasonably confident you are not a flake or jerk. They will also wait to book with you if you are busy.
I actually went to a builder and offered to shoot their model homes on spec. They would only pay me if they loved the photos otherwise they would pay nothing. Of course if they said they didn't like them, they wouldn't get pics.
They loved them and went on to use me on a variety of projects. They also referred me to other builders and designers.

The smartest thing I did was to demand a good price at the outset. I then never had to agonize over price increases. Starting low is the worst thing you can do.
As for pricing, learn how to price. It is not just calling around to see what others are charging. It is learning your costs and knowing your revenue needs. Set your prices and go forward. You are targeting high end clients so you need to charge the right price.

Then you aren't that photographer living in your mother's basement complaining about the competition.




  
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cccc
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Jan 24, 2016 10:51 |  #3

mltn wrote in post #17868629 (external link)
I'm gathering info in preparation of a marketing push to architects, interior designers, renovators, contractors, or basically any person or entity in need of high-end interior photographs. I have a Houzz.com profile, so I think this is the appropriate place to start.

Does anyone else have experience using Houzz to find new clients? How do you differentiate you and your services from that of your competition?

My first instinct was to find people who had bad photography on their existing projects, because obviously I could offer a major improvement. On the other hand, these people may just not care that the photos suck, and not be willing to shell out much or any money to have them done well.

Any thoughts are appreciated!

I have about 15 reviews on my Houzz profile and it has converted a few "lookers" into clients for me. I asked these new clients how they found me and they replied "You have the best reviews on Houzz in the area!"

If you want to use Houzz, make sure your clients are reviewing you.




  
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mltn
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Jan 26, 2016 13:36 |  #4

markd61 wrote in post #17869204 (external link)
I have no experience in using Houzz to find clients. It seems that it is a site that gets a lot of Pinterest type viewers. Homeowners looking for designers and contractors and not peripheral professionals.

I spend a lot of time marketing directly to realtors, architects, designers and in-house sales teams at country clubs.

I just threw my stuff up in Houzz and initially hadn't considered it a strong marketing asset, but after I got a little attention with no effort, it's worth a shot to try a bit more. I wanted to gather a list of businesses to market to, and it dawned on me that many of these people are on Houzz already, which greatly simplifies that aspect.

I do agree that in person meetings are best. What are your marketing strategies in person? Are you focusing on the quality of your product only? Or do you offer financial incentive upfront? Do you compare yourself to the local competition in any way?

I am intrigued by working on spec, as I can always use the portfolio shots. However I've found that some people won't put all of their creative energy into such a shoot, which can lead to a much lower quality product. When they're paying $X,XXX, they have to put in a lot of effort in terms of staging, styling, and on-site feedback to get the strongest images for their buck. Have you experienced this at all?

Thanks for the great feedback!

cccc wrote in post #17870810 (external link)
I have about 15 reviews on my Houzz profile and it has converted a few "lookers" into clients for me. I asked these new clients how they found me and they replied "You have the best reviews on Houzz in the area!"

If you want to use Houzz, make sure your clients are reviewing you.

This makes a lot of sense, I'll have to get cracking on this, thanks for sharing!




  
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digirebelva
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Jan 27, 2016 20:10 |  #5

so we dont re-invent the wheel

http://photographyforr​ealestate.net …te-photography-marketing/ (external link)


EOS 6d, 7dMKII, Tokina 11-16, Tokina 16-28, Sigma 70-200mm F/2.8, Sigma 17-50 F/2.8, Canon 24-70mm F/2.8L, Canon 70-200 F/2.8L, Mixed Speedlites and other stuff.

When it ceases to be fun, it will be time to walk away
Website (external link) | Fine Art America (external link)

  
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markd61
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Feb 09, 2016 17:27 |  #6

mltn wrote in post #17873782 (external link)
I just threw my stuff up in Houzz and initially hadn't considered it a strong marketing asset, but after I got a little attention with no effort, it's worth a shot to try a bit more. I wanted to gather a list of businesses to market to, and it dawned on me that many of these people are on Houzz already, which greatly simplifies that aspect.

I do agree that in person meetings are best. What are your marketing strategies in person? Are you focusing on the quality of your product only? Or do you offer financial incentive upfront? Do you compare yourself to the local competition in any way?

I am intrigued by working on spec, as I can always use the portfolio shots. However I've found that some people won't put all of their creative energy into such a shoot, which can lead to a much lower quality product. When they're paying $X,XXX, they have to put in a lot of effort in terms of staging, styling, and on-site feedback to get the strongest images for their buck. Have you experienced this at all?

Thanks for the great feedback!

This makes a lot of sense, I'll have to get cracking on this, thanks for sharing!

I look for new construction or remodel projects with a sign in front. I write down the info and walk in to the office without an appointment. I have brought brownies for the staff in the past but found that I ate a lot of brownies while driving around. Usually the principals are not in but I talk to the staff in a friendly way and show them my work (iPad or portfolio book). I ask if they are in need of photography ( I always look at their site to gauge their likelihood) and if they have any upcoming projects they are interested in. If they have a regular photographer I just say that if he or she retires or goes into witness protection I would be happy if they called me. I also try to get them to arrange a meeting with the principals (not too easy but hey, its a cheap ask). I call back a couple of days out and ask if the principals showed any interest. If so there is a good chance of a meeting and a possible small job.

As for shooting models on spec; it is pretty easy to do so as the models are already staged. If you get in early (before completion) you can show your work and make the pitch. I tell them that I will shoot for free, but if they like my photos and want to use them then they can pay me $xxx. If your work makes them comfortable they will usually say yes as they have nothing to lose. This works best with local developers as the National organizations have staff they ship all over the region doing their work.

At the end of the day you have to just go in and talk. You have zero to lose unless you are terribly smelly, disgusting or offensive. Being fun and confident helps and you help break up their day. You can become a welcome visitor.




  
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