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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Critique Corner 
Thread started 29 Jan 2016 (Friday) 09:23
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Blind ­ Fool
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Post edited over 4 years ago by Blind Fool.
     
Jan 29, 2016 09:23 |  #1

I took this shot of a local lake at sunrise at the end of last year and have been editing since then, I'd like some feedback on both the composition and the editing please as I think I've been staring at it too long now.

Shot at f/14 11mm for 180 seconds.

Updated image with suggested edits.


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MalVeauX
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Jan 29, 2016 09:35 |  #2

Heya,

Well for me, the right side tree line is over-exposed to the point where you lose detail, can't even see branches unless it's against the sky for some contrast. And the left side, under-exposed, to the point of also having no detail. I would think lifting shadows in general would help the left side and foreground, while dropping some exposure/highlights on the right side through masks, to even it out a bit.

Very best,


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rrblint
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Jan 29, 2016 10:04 |  #3

There appears to be a lot of diffraction. Why f14 at 11mm? f5.6 or so would have been perfect.


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Blind ­ Fool
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Jan 29, 2016 10:22 |  #4

MalVeauX wrote in post #17877573 (external link)
Heya,

Well for me, the right side tree line is over-exposed to the point where you lose detail, can't even see branches unless it's against the sky for some contrast. And the left side, under-exposed, to the point of also having no detail. I would think lifting shadows in general would help the left side and foreground, while dropping some exposure/highlights on the right side through masks, to even it out a bit.

Very best,

Thank you, I hadn't even seen that anymore!


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Blind ­ Fool
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Jan 29, 2016 10:23 |  #5

rrblint wrote in post #17877608 (external link)
There appears to be a lot of diffraction. Why f14 at 11mm? f5.6 or so would have been perfect.

I'm still fairly new to photography and thought I needed f/14 there abouts for the depth of field to keep everything sharp..


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MalVeauX
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Jan 29, 2016 10:35 |  #6

Blind Fool wrote in post #17877630 (external link)
I'm still fairly new to photography and thought I needed f/14 there abouts for the depth of field to keep everything sharp..

Heya,

Ultrawide is useful not just for it's field of view, but also, for how depth of field is calculated.

Here's a helpful calculator to help put it into perspective: LINK (external link).

I like to basically use this to get an idea for various focal lengths (I just round and generalize them) so I know what the maximum aperture should be, for appropriate depth of field to keep the horizon reasonably sharp.

If you put in the calculation for an APS-C sensor, 11mm focal length, F5.6 with a subject distance of 4 feet, you'll get 2 feet to infinity in focus basically. F8 gets you even closer in focus to the foreground.

I use things like that so I know about what aperture I have as an option.

When it comes to long exposure, aperture can be further stopped down to gain time.

But it's a handy way to have a quick knowledge of effective working distance and aperture for depth of field, while considering best image quality at a lens's best aperture for sharpness and performance, etc. It's probably closer to F8~F11.

Very best,


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rrblint
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Jan 29, 2016 10:37 |  #7

Blind Fool wrote in post #17877630 (external link)
I'm still fairly new to photography and thought I needed f/14 there abouts for the depth of field to keep everything sharp..

DOF is very large at 11mm. For example with focus pt at 4ft, aperture f5.6 DOF is:



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Blind ­ Fool
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Jan 29, 2016 10:38 |  #8

MalVeauX wrote in post #17877645 (external link)
Heya,

Ultrawide is useful not just for it's field of view, but also, for how depth of field is calculated.

Here's a helpful calculator to help put it into perspective: LINK (external link).

I like to basically use this to get an idea for various focal lengths (I just round and generalize them) so I know what the maximum aperture should be, for appropriate depth of field to keep the horizon reasonably sharp.

If you put in the calculation for an APS-C sensor, 11mm focal length, F5.6 with a subject distance of 4 feet, you'll get 2 feet to infinity in focus basically. F8 gets you even closer in focus to the foreground.

I use things like that so I know about what aperture I have as an option.

When it comes to long exposure, aperture can be further stopped down to gain time.

But it's a handy way to have a quick knowledge of effective working distance and aperture for depth of field, while considering best image quality at a lens's best aperture for sharpness and performance, etc. It's probably closer to F8~F11.

Very best,

Thank you very much, looks like I've got some reading and practice to do :)


My flickr (external link)
Canon EOS 700D - EF-S 18-55mm f3.5-5.6 IS STM, EF-S 55-250mm f4-5.6 IS II, EF 50mm f1.8, EF Macro 100mm f2.8L IS USM, EF-S10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM

  
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Blind ­ Fool
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Jan 29, 2016 10:39 |  #9

rrblint wrote in post #17877649 (external link)
DOF is very large at 11mm. For example with focus pt at 4ft, aperture f5.6 DOF is:

thumbnail
Hosted photo: posted by rrblint in
./showthread.php?p=178​77649&i=i163476173
forum: Critique Corner

Thank you so much, still so much to learn...


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Canon EOS 700D - EF-S 18-55mm f3.5-5.6 IS STM, EF-S 55-250mm f4-5.6 IS II, EF 50mm f1.8, EF Macro 100mm f2.8L IS USM, EF-S10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM

  
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Blind ­ Fool
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Jan 29, 2016 10:57 |  #10

MalVeauX wrote in post #17877573 (external link)
Heya,

Well for me, the right side tree line is over-exposed to the point where you lose detail, can't even see branches unless it's against the sky for some contrast. And the left side, under-exposed, to the point of also having no detail. I would think lifting shadows in general would help the left side and foreground, while dropping some exposure/highlights on the right side through masks, to even it out a bit.

Very best,

I've masked over the areas and adjusted them as suggested, personally I think it's a lot better now, thank you :)


My flickr (external link)
Canon EOS 700D - EF-S 18-55mm f3.5-5.6 IS STM, EF-S 55-250mm f4-5.6 IS II, EF 50mm f1.8, EF Macro 100mm f2.8L IS USM, EF-S10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM

  
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