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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Urban Life & Travel 
Thread started 30 Jan 2016 (Saturday) 14:54
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Amish country

 
Jeff_56
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Post edited over 3 years ago by Jeff_56.
     
Jan 30, 2016 14:54 |  #1
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I guess this qualifies for this forum. It's a different world than most know so it's a far off land to those people. I live in the middle of it. I hope you enjoy these shots. I could shoot photos of them all day if they would allow it but they shy away from such things. They don't see themselves as a tourist attraction.

Start with their farm equipment.

IMAGE: http://www.a-framevideo.com/Amish%20horse%20and%20wagon%20d.jpg

Then some shots of how they work. The first one is a little soft because I shot it from a long way off. They don't really like having their photo taken even I believe this girl seemed to be enjoying it.

IMAGE: http://www.a-framevideo.com/Amish%20girl%20milking%20cow%203.jpg

IMAGE: http://www.a-framevideo.com/fodder%20shocks%205x.jpg

IMAGE: http://www.a-framevideo.com/fodder%20shocks%204x.jpg

And a shot of their transportation.

IMAGE: http://www.a-framevideo.com/Amish%20buggy%20ride%201b.jpg

One more shot showing my family from 1885. Some things are eternal. This is my great, great, great grandfather working corn the same as the Amish in the photos here.

IMAGE: http://www.a-framevideo.com/great%20great%20great%20grandfather%20Daniel%20E%20McDavid%20c.jpg



  
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vilimo
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Feb 04, 2016 10:43 |  #2

Nice series... thanks for sharing




  
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DubR
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Feb 08, 2016 09:39 |  #3

One year in the 50s, when I lived on a farm, we did our corn up in fodder shocks, but only the one year. I fondly recall one cool, fall evening, climbing up on top and making a nest and lying there looking at the stars when a flight of hundreds geese flew over. Wish I could there now.


One thing I know, that, whereas I was blind, now I see.
John 9:25

  
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Jeff_56
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Feb 08, 2016 10:05 |  #4
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A very well known local author wrote in a book of how he was traveling to town to get his paycheck for teaching just after classes had let out for Christmas. This was back in maybe the 1930's or 1940's. He doesn't really say. But it's a very rural area and travel in the winter is tough. He was following a trail along the top of a ridge and missed a turn in a heavy snow. He got lost and spent a night in sub-zero weather huddled under a fodder shock for warmth. It was enough to keep him alive and in the light of day he found his way back to the trail.

Times have certainly changed. Now giant combines rumble around the country side that can harvest a 100 acre corn crop in a couple of hours. I remember doing that stuff by hand back in the 1960's and it took about 6 of us about 12 hours to do 10 acres of corn. We were pulling the corn off the stalks and tossing the corn into a wagon. We thought that was more modern than what many were doing. Now we have great roads that are kept open through the worst weather with only very rare exceptions. And even then I have a truck thst could make it through any snow storm I've seen in my life in this region. Times have really changed.




  
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DubR
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Feb 08, 2016 12:07 as a reply to  @ Jeff_56's post |  #5

Well, as I recall, it was very comfortable and warm, so getting inside I'm sure that one could survive a very cold night no problem.
My Grandfather farmed with a team of mules for years after the neighbors had gone modern. Modern being a relative term as these were the days that a John Deere was known as a "Johnny Pop." I often helped pick corn by hand, shucking the ears with that hook that you strapped on your hand. We'd shuck the corn and throw the ears in the wagon and when we started to get ahead, my Grandfather would shout at the mules to "Getup" and Whoa" to move them ahead in the row. Does it get any better than that!?
I've had a wonderful life having been over most of the world but I'd trade it all for those early years on the farm!
Yes,times have really changed.


One thing I know, that, whereas I was blind, now I see.
John 9:25

  
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Jeff_56
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Feb 08, 2016 12:32 |  #6
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Hey my family plowed with a mule when I was very young before we got our first JD. Never heard the Johnny Pop thing though. Do you know the commands to make the mules turn? "Gee" to turn right and "haw" to turn left. The terms are turned around in the UK because of the position of the driver. The commands actually tell the team to go either toward the driver or away from the driver. Dog sleds use the same terms.

We actually didn't do our own plowing with that mule. We had to hire it done since we didn't have our own mules. But my great-grandfather did. He used mules to plow right up until he retired from farming for a living which would have been in the mid-70's. He worked his farm by himself until he was about 80. It was common for men to work that long when there was no social security to fall back on. If you wanted to eat you worked as long as you could. He finally moved in with my grandmother and retired. I went to stay with him for about a week once. We got to ride his mule and my brother, who also stayed there with me, talked me into riding his 400 lb. hog. We were some crazy hillbillies but we had that hog buffaloed long enough to take a short ride. We got out of his stall pretty quick though. :-)

I knew people who cut timber with mules. They actually have several advantages over more modern equipment not the least of which was the price. It costs a lot of money to cut timber with modern equipment.




  
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DubR
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Feb 08, 2016 14:21 as a reply to  @ Jeff_56's post |  #7

My Grandfather did it all with the mules. I can only remember the one's name, Rastus. Can't for the life of me remember the other ones.

We called them Johnny Pops because of the unique sound they made. https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=C0O0_bserWQ (external link) Nothing else sounded like them. Hope this link works.

We tried to ride the pigs when we fed them. Talk about a wild ride! Three seconds might have been tops!

If I can find them, I have pictures of our farm when the crews came with the threshing machine!


One thing I know, that, whereas I was blind, now I see.
John 9:25

  
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Jeff_56
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Post edited over 3 years ago by Jeff_56. (2 edits in all)
     
Feb 08, 2016 14:24 |  #8
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LOL a 3 second hog ride was plenty long enough to take your life in your hands. Those things can do serious damage if they get motivated. I recognize the sound of those old JD's. But here there was another tractor that really had that sound even more. They were Allis Chalmers. Have you heard the old hit-and-miss engine single cylinder tractor engines? They still used those motors into the 40's. They were controlled by the spark instead of with a throttle. They really have a distinctive sound. People would use those engines for everything from powering a lumber mill to just about anything. They were simple and ran forever. I've seen lots of them at antique tractor shows which are becoming very popular these days. Here's one to listen to:

https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=0w5OII6h504 (external link)

This video has more information:

https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=K8XLhHKH4mA (external link)




  
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DubR
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Feb 08, 2016 15:44 as a reply to  @ Jeff_56's post |  #9

We saw the Allis Chalmers, International Farmall, Massey Ferguson but the John Deere always seemed to get us farm boys attention. We had a Massey Ferguson, small but it had it's good points (could get in the barn and chicken house in the spring to get the manure out). I'll post some pics of some old tractors I took a while back on a Meetup if you don't mind.

Never saw any hit and miss until going to fairs and such. Would see them being used to grind flour. Really neat.

Because they didn't have electricity until the late 50s, my Grandmother had a gasoline washing machine. In the winter they ran the flexible exhaust tubing outside and moved the whole thing out for the summer.

I hope to get up to the Amish area soon as it's been on my bucket list to take some pictures. Would love to take some winter B&W but not sure if that will happen. My wife's Mother and sister live in Frederick, Md and they try to go over in that area shopping. If you live close and the opportunity arises, B&W should be great for that area.


One thing I know, that, whereas I was blind, now I see.
John 9:25

  
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Jeff_56
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Feb 08, 2016 16:05 |  #10
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I live in the middle of a large area of Amish here in Ohio. The thing about taking their photos is that they aren't real keen on being considered tourist attractions. I generally take my shots from the road so they don't get mad at me. Or at least if they do I'm gone before I hear about it. :-) I don't think I'm doing them any harm and I generally don't post any faces unless, like the milking girl, they seem to enjoy having their photo taken. Not all Amish are as dedicated as the rest. I'm not trying to drive a wedge or anything. What can I say? I'm a photo junkie. :rolleyes:




  
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Reservoir ­ Dog
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Post edited over 3 years ago by Reservoir Dog.
     
Feb 08, 2016 22:52 |  #11

Interesting thread, i hope you will continue to shoot them and feed this thread (i subscribed ;-)a )


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rolling ­ green
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Feb 08, 2016 23:10 |  #12

Yes please keep them coming!




  
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adivineeternity
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Feb 09, 2016 11:27 |  #13

Lovely images. I've been to Amish country around Mansfield a couple of times and it is beautiful. I also lived in an area in PA (not Lancaster) with a sizable Amish population on and off when I lived with my mother. You're so right about their lack of fondness for having photos taken of them. I, too, hope you'll continue to post.


I have a flickr (external link)

  
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DubR
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Feb 18, 2016 19:59 |  #14

My Grandfather used one just like this behind a team of mules on his farm near Kingston, MO. until the late 60s. It was a hard life.


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One thing I know, that, whereas I was blind, now I see.
John 9:25

  
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Jeff_56
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Post edited over 3 years ago by Jeff_56.
     
Feb 18, 2016 21:27 |  #15
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My father and his father used mowing machines like that one. We had a couple of them sitting around the farm where they were left after we got a tractor. And they put up hay with pitchforks. Heck I put up hay with a pitchfork one year. It's way harder than using a baler. I never complained about putting up baled had after that. We built a big setup to allow cattle to feed from all winter on their own from the hay we put in with pitchforks. Wow was that ever hard and it ended up not even working right. That was the last time we tried that. Still I do know what it's like.




  
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