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Thread started 20 Oct 2011 (Thursday) 11:46
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Milkyway nightscapes

 
Philli_B_123
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Feb 14, 2016 18:21 |  #2791

I got lucky the other night and got some pink glow from the Aurora Australis!

Pretty grainy photo but I don't really care because its the Aurora Australis! haha

IMAGE: https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1662/24315354664_b94d4f73c6_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/D3Ex​NQ  (external link) Milkyway and the Aurora Australis (external link) by Phill Berkhout (external link), on Flickr

flickr (external link) - Canon 600D/Tokina 11-16mm f2.8/Canon 15-85mm f3.5-5.6/Canon 50mm 1.4/Tamron 70-300mm f4-5.6/noob skills --->Instagram (external link)<---

  
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S.R.M.
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Feb 21, 2016 04:51 |  #2792

I spent a few hours observing with my brother-in-law's 14 inch Dobsonian scope a few nights ago. Here's an image taken during the alignment process, for which a green laser was used. It shows the southern Milky way and Magellanic Clouds.

IMAGE: https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1658/25043076415_e2cbf9480a_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/E9Yj​8z  (external link) Aligning the telescope (external link) by Stephen Mudge (external link), on Flickr


Stephen
---------------
6D; EF 16-35 f/4L IS USM; EF 24mm f/2.8 IS USM; EF 35mm f/2; EF 50mm f/1.8 II; EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM; EF 70-200 f/4L USM; Samyang 14mm f/2.8

flickr (external link) / flickriver (external link)

  
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Celestron
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Feb 21, 2016 10:51 |  #2793

That's a new way to me using a green lazer that way. When you say aligning are you meaning polar alignment or just easier way than using a finderscope ? How were the views in that dob ?




  
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lblanchardiii
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Feb 21, 2016 16:13 |  #2794

I wish I could take a picture of the milkyway. I can't seem to grasp the concept apparently as I've tried a few times.




  
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FEChariot
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Feb 21, 2016 16:16 |  #2795

lblanchardiii wrote in post #17907278 (external link)
I wish I could take a picture of the milkyway. I can't seem to grasp the concept apparently as I've tried a few times.


Check out lonelyspeck.com for a good tutorial.


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xpfloyd
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Feb 21, 2016 16:20 |  #2796

lblanchardiii wrote in post #17907278 (external link)
I wish I could take a picture of the milkyway. I can't seem to grasp the concept apparently as I've tried a few times.

Dark sky / high ISO / wide aperture / as long an exposure time as you can push without star trails


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lblanchardiii
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Feb 21, 2016 16:22 |  #2797

FEChariot wrote in post #17907283 (external link)
Check out lonelyspeck.com for a good tutorial.

Thanks for that. Time to start reading.




  
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sandwedge
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Feb 21, 2016 23:27 |  #2798

A question for the crop shooters here: would the new Tokina 14-20 F/2 be wide enough for Milky way nightscapes? I'm going to purchase a lens soon (probably the 11-16 2.8), but might get the new lens if 14mm is wide enough. The main purpose for the lens would be for Milky Way and meteor showers.


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S.R.M.
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Feb 22, 2016 04:51 |  #2799

Celestron wrote in post #17906815 (external link)
That's a new way to me using a green lazer that way. When you say aligning are you meaning polar alignment or just easier way than using a finderscope ? How were the views in that dob ?

Hi Ron,

this was a "go-to" Dob, so all that was required was a two star alignment at the beginning. What we were doing was holding the laser flush against the "eye" end of the finder and shining the beam through the finder. That way the beam marks exactly where the scope is aiming! No need to actually look through the finder. Once the beam is aligned with the chosen star (which in this case was Rigel in Orion),the star is within the field of a 35mm eyepiece in the scope.

I works well, and it provides a good opportunity for photos at the same time!

Cheers,
Stephen



Stephen
---------------
6D; EF 16-35 f/4L IS USM; EF 24mm f/2.8 IS USM; EF 35mm f/2; EF 50mm f/1.8 II; EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM; EF 70-200 f/4L USM; Samyang 14mm f/2.8

flickr (external link) / flickriver (external link)

  
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Bauhaus
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Feb 22, 2016 08:05 |  #2800

Milkyway over Alcudia. One of my first attempts.

IMAGE: https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5708/24040142296_bc024c3216_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/CCm1​L1  (external link) IMG_4166 (external link) by Gravity Visuals (external link), auf Flickr

6D GRIPPED | 5D II GRIPPED | 24 1.4 ART | 35 1.4 ART | 50 1.2 L | 85 1.8 USM | 24-105 4.0 L
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VSCO FILM 01 - 07

  
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TCampbell
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Feb 22, 2016 09:32 |  #2801

Bauhaus wrote in post #17908050 (external link)
Milkyway over Alcudia. One of my first attempts.

You're starting to get some structure in there, but I noticed the light glow in the upper left corner. I checked the date... looks like you had a waxing gibbous moon.

You'll be able to get much more structure in the Milky Way if you can shoot it on a moonless night... and better still if you can get away from city lights.




  
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Bauhaus
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Feb 22, 2016 09:35 |  #2802

TCampbell wrote in post #17908118 (external link)
You're starting to get some structure in there, but I noticed the light glow in the upper left corner. I checked the date... looks like you had a waxing gibbous moon.

You'll be able to get much more structure in the Milky Way if you can shoot it on a moonless night... and better still if you can get away from city lights.

Yeah, the moon was really bright. I just tried a shot from our appartment roof there and that was the result The other days with less moon were really cloudy, so this was the best I could get. Since I am living in a big city I need to drive at least 60-70km's to enter an area of low light pollution. Thanks for your compliment anyway! :-)


6D GRIPPED | 5D II GRIPPED | 24 1.4 ART | 35 1.4 ART | 50 1.2 L | 85 1.8 USM | 24-105 4.0 L
550D GRIPPED | 10-20 4.0-5.6
SPEEDLITE 430 EXII
VSCO FILM 01 - 07

  
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TCampbell
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Feb 22, 2016 10:13 |  #2803

lblanchardiii wrote in post #17907278 (external link)
I wish I could take a picture of the milkyway. I can't seem to grasp the concept apparently as I've tried a few times.

You want

(a) a solid tripod (nothing that would shake or vibrate during the exposure -- especially if it's windy)
(b) a very wide angle lens (you'll see why in a moment)
(c) a way to trigger the exposure without touching the camera... either a remote shutter release or you can use the self-timer on your camera. But if you do use the self-timer on your camera then you probably can't use bulb mode and you might want to use bulb mode.
(d) some math...

If you have a "full frame" sensor camera (36mm x 24mm sensor size) then your number is "600" (remember that number). If you have any other camera (e.g. an APS-C camera) then you need to divide 600 by the crop factor of your camera. E.g. an APS-C camera with a crop-factor of either 1.5 or 1.6 would bring that 600 number down to either 400 or 375 (e.g. 600 ÷ 1.5 = 400... and 600 ÷ 1.6 = 375.) This is your base number for the exposure time calculation.

Now... divide that base number by the focal length of your lens. The result is the number of seconds you can leave the shutter open and NOT notice the stars elongating due to the movement of the Earth.

For example, suppose you have a "full frame" DSLR camera with a 14mm wide-angle lens. You would divide: 600 ÷ 14 = 42.857... let's just round that to 43 seconds. That's the number of seconds. Go longer than this and your stars will begin to elongate and form star trails.

Another example, suppose you have an APS-C DLSR with a 1.6 crop factor, and a 10mm lens. Then you'd get: 375 ÷ 10 = 37.5 seconds for your longest exposure.

If you try this with longer focal length lenses, you'll see that you don't get nearly so much time. E.g. if you have, say a Nikon APS-C sensor camera (crop factor is 1.5 ... so your base value is 400) and you try to use a 50mm lens, then you'd get 400 ÷ 50 = 8 -- only 8 seconds isn't very long to expose the stars. This is why short focal length lenses provide a big advantage.

Some photographers think this 600 base is a bit much and they prefer to start with a smaller base such as 500 - just to make sure they don't see any evidence of elongation in the stars even under close scrutiny. That's up to you.

It also helps if the focal ratio of the lens is low. Low focal ratio ultra-wide angle lenses can be expensive. Rokinon makes a 14mm f/2.8 which is entirely manual (even the aperture has a manual aperture ring) which costs about $300 USD. Nothing is automatic on it -- no auto-focus, no auto-aperture, but for astrophotography you really don't care about those anyway since you have to manually focus and you'll want the widest possible aperture. Rokinon also makes a 10mm f/2.8 but it's about $400. They also have an 8mm f/3.5 but it's a fish-eye. These tend to be somewhat popular for Milky Way shots because the optics are reasonable and the price is low.

If you go longer then you need a tracking head and you'll get blurry horizons.

Also... dark skies rule! Get away from urban/sub-urban light pollution and shoot on a moonless night (check your calendar to find the "new moon" and pick a clear night near the new moon -- or even near the 3rd quarter moon since a 3rd quarter moon doesn't rise until the middle of the night and you'll probably be done shooting by then.)




  
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Celestron
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Post edited over 2 years ago by Celestron.
     
Feb 22, 2016 11:12 |  #2804

lblanchardiii wrote in post #17907278 (external link)
I wish I could take a picture of the milkyway. I can't seem to grasp the concept apparently as I've tried a few times.


What camera are you using and what lenses do you have ? That is key items to helping you take a night time image of anything . Not all cameras work the same way and not all cameras have the same settings . My older camera XSi (450D) has a night time mod with no flash and all I do is focus , aim and trip the shutter and the camera does everything in auto and I can get decent images without star trails . Basically it works off the amount of light that has been absorbed for an image and then it stops exposing . I don't know that new or more expensive cameras have the same exact setting mode or not . Sometimes I mention that and no one knows what I'm talking about . However if you have a newer camera you can do the calculations mentioned above and get decent shots .




  
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heldGaze
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Feb 22, 2016 15:19 |  #2805

TCampbell wrote in post #17908163 (external link)
You want ...


...to start searching TCampbell's posts in the Astronomy & Celestial forums. Such detailed posts are going to be helpful whether or not you had that specific question to begin with.

PS - Thanks again TCampbell for the direct help you've given me. I see now that I'm not special though, you just take your time to help people out like this.


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