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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 23 Mar 2016 (Wednesday) 18:00
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Slow motion video of shutter

 
iowajim
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Mar 23, 2016 18:00 |  #1

https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=CmjeCchGRQo (external link)

Here's an interesting look into the shutter of a dSLR in slow motion.


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Benitoite
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Mar 23, 2016 18:09 |  #2

iowajim wrote in post #17946128 (external link)
https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=CmjeCchGRQo (external link)

Here's an interesting look into the shutter of a dSLR in slow motion.

Yeah I love that episode. I like the one where they're spinning CDs at high speeds.




  
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Wilt
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Mar 23, 2016 18:42 |  #3

Great! I grabbed a still frame, so that i can illustrate the slit shutter curtain differences of higher speeds vs. the all-open curtains of the X-synch and slower speeds.


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Mar 24, 2016 05:55 |  #4

Absolutely amazing when you think about it. I have no idea what the average actuation lifetime is of DSLR's are (over a hundred-thousand?), but considering everything happens (the mirror clacking up and down, the shutter blades sliding, etc.) as many times as it does, it is a miracle DSLRs last as long as they do.


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iowajim
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Mar 24, 2016 06:49 |  #5

I've read a description of how the 'slit' shutter works to get those crazy fast shutter speeds, but I never seen it in action before.


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Wilt
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Mar 24, 2016 08:47 |  #6

It would be interesting and fun to see the same high speed camera show, in addition to the Canon dSLR, how the horizontal cloth shutter curtains of most 1960's-1980's SLR works, and also how the metal Copal Square vertical metal shutter curtains (of the three SLRs that used them) worked, all just above their limited X-Synch speeds (just above 1/60, just above 1/125 respectively)


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Tedder
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Mar 24, 2016 16:43 |  #7

Seeing that mirror slap and flap reminds me why mirror lock-up is useful for certain shutter speeds. Yikes!


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Slow motion video of shutter
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