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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 20 Mar 2016 (Sunday) 13:28
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Crop and FF ramblings

 
Tapeman
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Mar 28, 2016 21:28 |  #16

I believe, as with film, larger formats and pixel sites are an advantage.
As photographic technology improves that advantage will perhaps diminish somewhat.


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Archibald
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Mar 28, 2016 21:38 |  #17

Tapeman wrote in post #17952715 (external link)
I believe, as with film, larger formats and pixel sites are an advantage.

Advantage and disadvantages.


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John ­ Sheehy
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Mar 29, 2016 09:08 |  #18

Tapeman wrote in post #17952715 (external link)
I believe, as with film, larger formats and pixel sites are an advantage.
As photographic technology improves that advantage will perhaps diminish somewhat.

It comes in waves now. If you look at it as read noise per unit of sensor area, big pixels usually lower it first, and then tomorrow's small pixels catch up with or surpass it. In the future, when photon-counting sensors are used, there will be zero benefit to large pixels, except for smaller files and burst speeds.




  
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chexjc
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Post edited over 3 years ago by chexjc. (2 edits in all)
     
Mar 30, 2016 08:32 |  #19

ebiggs wrote in post #17951852 (external link)
That is the BS that some push or want you to think. You can't use a 6D for sports or you can't use a 7D for landscapes. Right! It's nonsense. You as the photographer are more important to success than the gear you use.
My .02 cents and worth every penny. ;-)a

You are right and wrong. It's not BS when some push for one format over another with the subject in mind -- that makes a lot of sense. However, you can of course photograph whatever you want with whichever camera you please and, as you stated, the photographer is always going to be more important than the gear they use.

Personally, as someone who shot a variety of subjects (portraits, landscapes, sports, etc.) with a crop-sensor and then shot the same variety of subjects with a full frame camera, I would still recommend the full frame in 9 out of 10 scenarios. Generally speaking you get better resolution, dynamic range, low-light performance, a nicer viewfinder, and color/contrast rendition. Also generally speaking, the auto-focus performance of a modern FX camera is going to be sufficient for most needs. The real benefit of crop-sensors is the cost/quality war. There is undoubtedly an amazing lineup of crop-sensor glass that is extremely affordable by comparison. The only time I ever grabbed my crop-sensor was when I absolutely needed the extra reach, which wasn't often.


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John ­ Sheehy
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Mar 30, 2016 09:54 |  #20

chexjc wrote in post #17954518 (external link)
You are right and wrong. It's not BS when some push for one format over another with the subject in mind -- that makes a lot of sense. However, you can of course photograph whatever you want with whichever camera you please and, as you stated, the photographer is always going to be more important than the gear they use.

Personally, as someone who shot a variety of subjects (portraits, landscapes, sports, etc.) with a crop-sensor and then shot the same variety of subjects with a full frame camera, I would still recommend the full frame in 9 out of 10 scenarios. Generally speaking you get better resolution, dynamic range, low-light performance, a nicer viewfinder, and color/contrast rendition. Also generally speaking, the auto-focus performance of a modern FX camera is going to be sufficient for most needs. The real benefit of crop-sensors is the cost/quality war. There is undoubtedly an amazing lineup of crop-sensor glass that is extremely affordable by comparison. The only time I ever grabbed my crop-sensor was when I absolutely needed the extra reach, which wasn't often.

Then your 9 out of 10 doesn't work for people who are almost always focal-length-limited. Before cameras like the D800 and 5Ds which came out at a time when they had the same pixel density as the manufacturers' best crop cameras, total pixel counts were closer for FF and crop DSLRs. To me, because there are bandwidth/data limitations, this seems like a good temporary situation as we await faster processing. IOW, use a denser, smaller sensor as a better alternative to the TC. The elephant in the room that many people ignore is that there seems to be a limit to usable PD AF at about f/8; that means that if you use the larger sensor with the larger pixels, you get less pixels on subject with the AF limit. That is MAJOR; that is why I want a 10fps EOS body with a 20MP 1" sensor and f/8 AF! That, to me, would be progress; not regression.




  
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ebiggs
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Mar 30, 2016 09:56 |  #21

chexjc wrote in post #17954518 (external link)
... the photographer is always going to be more important than the gear they use.

... you get better resolution, dynamic range, low-light performance, a nicer viewfinder, and color/contrast rendition.

The problem with claiming this is, you probably bought a better camera. The trend in FF is mostly a more advanced camera with the best stuff engineered in it. Even the "entry" level 6D is pretty advanced. Especially for a bottom rung camera. Generally speaking the newest offering from Canon makes great images.

I contend it is pixel size more than sensor size that determines the "better" you are seeing. The term "crop sensor" was coined as a naming convention, more than an accurate description.


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Crop and FF ramblings
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