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Thread started 19 Apr 2016 (Tuesday) 18:18
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D is for ........

 
BigAl007
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Apr 19, 2016 18:18 |  #1

de Haviland of course. Geoffrey de Havilland started out as the designer for Airco, and designed several Scout and light bomber types for the RFC/RNAS. I don't have any pictures of the DH4, I don't even know if one has survived. Looking at Wikipedia I see that the US also widely used the DH4, with many built by various manufacturers including Boeing. The DH4 was to be superseded by the DH9, but the engine that it was to use turned out to be underpowered once it was fully developed. So although the DH9 entered service, instead of it being as fast as the German fighters of the day it was considerably slower. This led to heavy losses.

DH9 at the IWM Duxford.

IMAGE: https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3745/10520961995_f8ae74dbec_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/h2GF​st  (external link) de Havilland DH 9 (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

The DH9 was considerably redesigned and fitted with a better engine, mostly the American Liberty, but also some others as well and became the DH9A, or as it was better known in RAF service the Nine Ack. The Nine Ack had a long service life, operating in much of the Empire.

DH9A at the RAF Museum Hendon.

IMAGE: https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3817/9245597316_38eea71ea7_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/f616​Yh  (external link) de Havilland DH 9A (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

In 1916 Airco also founded a civilian airline, Air Transport and Travel (AT&T) operating flights between London and Paris using modified DH4's initially. This went on until 1919 when Airco went bust. AT&T were taken over by Daimler hire cars, then part of the BSA group. At the same time Geoffrey de Havilland formed the de Havilland Aircraft company, buying out much of Airco's stock of components and engines. de Havilland continued to produce a range of single and twin engined passenger types, as well as it's famous range of "Moth" light sport aircraft throughout the 1920's and 30's.

First up is the DH51, this is not one of the "Moths" and is a three seater. It was built in 1924, and in 1929 was exported to Kenya, where it was christened "Miss Kenya". Although postdating the company the DH51 is currently painted in a scheme that represents the early AT&T airline. The aircraft which is operated by the Shuttleworth Collection was used in a TV advert for BA, as AT&T's successor company Daimler Hire, went on to become Imperial Airways and then British Airways.

IMAGE: https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5525/10496086516_cfc702e585_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/gZvb​QU  (external link) de Havilland DH 51 (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

The original "Moths" were the DH60 series, either Cirrus Moths or Gypsy Moths depending on the engine that was fitted. The original Cirrus engine used parts from an old WWI surplus Renault engine, which limited supply. The Gypsy engine was designed and built solely by de Havilland's and although a much better engine it kept production costs down such that Gypsy Moths cost the same as the Cirrus Moths.

A 1925 DH60 Cirrus Moth

IMAGE: https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8397/8644614175_93542d6ed2_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/eaTU​BZ  (external link) DeHavilland DH60 Moth (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

Although in the DH60X model the X stood for experimental, as it was the prototype specification it was possible to order the aircraft in this specification throughout it's production life. This one is from 1928

IMAGE: https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8405/8645675168_6f4d05241b_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/eaZm​1Y  (external link) de Havilland DH 60X Moth (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

Possibly the most famous of the "Moths" was the Tiger Moth. This was actually developed to be a basic training aircraft for the RAF. The number of modifications over the Gypsy Moth lead it to gain it's own model number, becoming the DH82 series of aircraft. Saying that all of the Tiger Moths still on the UK register are DH82a's. This one at the Shuttleworth Collection is in RAF markings.

IMAGE: https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8118/8645710088_efdde82a01_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/eaZw​p3  (external link) DeHavilland DH82a Tiger Moth, DeHavilland DH51 (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr.

As well as light sport aircraft such as the Moth's, and the larger airliners DH also built the famous DH88 Comet Racer, which should not be confused with the post war DH106 Comet airliner. There were three DH88's entered in the 1936 MacRobertson London to Sidney Air race, which actually departed from RAF Mildenhall in Suffolk (now a USAF base). The race was won by Campbell and Black in one of the DH88's. This is the only surviving DH88, and is again fully airworthy and part of the Shuttleworth collection.

IMAGE: https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1650/25723817780_3c124b05b6_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/Fc8h​PE  (external link) de Havilland DH 88 Comet (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

One of the more recognisable of the DH biplane airliners are the DH84 Dragon, and the improved DH89 Dragon Rapide, which as also known as the Dominie in RAF service. This is the earlier DH84 Dragon, in the colours of Railway Air Services.

IMAGE: https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3933/15483561902_2c4b014b17_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/pAei​vQ  (external link) de Havilland DH 84 Dragon (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

Since that is my eight images, I'll have to leave the rest of the DH types until another thread. Unless there is enough call to put it in a second post in this thread.

Alan

Previously in this series we had:

A is for..........
B is for .........
A is also for .......
So B is also for .......
Finally B is also for ..........
C is for .....
D is for ........
E is for ........
F is for ......
G is for:
H is for Hawker!

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TerryMiller
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Apr 19, 2016 18:32 |  #2

I for one would prefer to keep the entire series here. Please continue on with the photos.


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Apr 19, 2016 18:56 |  #3

Since that is my eight images, I'll have to leave the rest of the DH types until another thread. Unless there is enough call to put it in a second post in this thread.

Another vote to keep this thread together, so it's OK to post them up!


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Apr 19, 2016 19:03 |  #4

PhotosGuy wrote in post #17977764 (external link)
Another vote to keep this thread together, so it's OK to post them up!

Thanks Frank I'll do the post here in the next day or so. One of these posts takes me about two hours to produce, and it's now 01:00 and I should be going to bed.

Alan


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Apr 19, 2016 23:38 |  #5

Great series
Thanks


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Apr 20, 2016 11:51 |  #6

Wow! nice!


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Apr 20, 2016 12:11 |  #7

Excellent set & glad you can continue adding to it. I'm pretty sure I have a few photos of a nice scale DH 4 plus although from a different era I lived very close to the De Havilland plant located in Toronto when they were developing the Caribou, which I still think is an amazing plane.


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Apr 20, 2016 16:44 |  #8

cicopo wrote in post #17978512 (external link)
Excellent set & glad you can continue adding to it. I'm pretty sure I have a few photos of a nice scale DH 4 plus although from a different era I lived very close to the De Havilland plant located in Toronto when they were developing the Caribou, which I still think is an amazing plane.

If you have a photo's of a nice scale DH4 then feel free to post them up here. It would be nice to see one. My father was heavily in to RC aircraft, so I have been around them for as long as I can remember. The club we belonged to flew from the peri track at the old RAF Hornchurch airfield until it was built on in the mid 70's. We used to park the cars in one of the old E pens. In the mid 90's there was an archaeology program on the TV, called 2 men in a Trench that dug famous British Battlefield sites. They did a dig at RAF Hornchurch looking for one of the old E pens, as they had all been bulldozed flat when the built the housing estate and park area. Funny to think that something that you played in/on as a kid could end up as a subject for an archeology dig. I was involved with the hobby up till my early 20's when being in the RAF, other interests/sports and then marriage got in the way. The RC aircraft were probably one of the reasons that I got my interest in aviation.

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Apr 20, 2016 18:19 |  #9

My passion started early in life, and started with Lancasters because my father served a full career with the RCAF & my early years were at a Lancaster base. Took a while but I have found a couple of decent photos of the DH 4.

IMAGE: http://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-_iGel5fhUcg/TnFB8Uyj39I/AAAAAAAAJfc/tiL6CwHKZvk_UIdV79_qRPu5ADE87cAIQCCo/s1200-Ic42/VZ1Q5174.JPG

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Apr 22, 2016 10:08 |  #10

Very good, Alan.
I'm gonna have to put a UK air show on my bucket list.


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Apr 22, 2016 12:46 |  #11

So moving on from the Dragon, it's replacement, and probably the most successful of the British short haul airliners we have the DH89 Dragon Rapide. This was actually based on a scaled down version of the four engined DH84 Express, and features that aircrafts finely tapering pointed wings. This is a DH89A in wartime civilian markings, as operated by Scottish Airways Ltd.

IMAGE: https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1625/25803042612_ffdb8f8ee2_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/Fj8k​B3  (external link) de Havilland DH 89A Dragon Rapide (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

Although by the outbreak of WWII DH had provided the RAF with what had become it's standard basic training aircraft, the company had not continued to provide operational types for the RAF. With the outbreak of the war that was to change. DH were keen to help the war effort with operational types, and put forwards proposals for several different fast light bombers. They were repeatedly turned down by the Air Ministry, and because of the scarcity of material could not produce a new type of aircraft without official permission. So The DH designers thought outside of the box, and came up with a design that did not use any of the restricted materials. Instead they designed an aircraft that made use of a stressed monocoque made from plywood and Balsa, similar to the used in the DH91 Albatross four engined airliner. This aircraft the DH 98 Mosquito, probably the most famous of all the DH types, was to become one of the first true multi role combat aircraft to enter service with an air force. The Mosquito served as Bomber, Fighter Bomber, Fighter, Night Fighter, and Photo Reconnaissance variants. The bomber variant was adapted to carry the 4000 Lb Cookie, and it could carry that bomb all the way to Berlin, and achieve a speed of 415 mph at 28000' (in level flight) while fully loaded. On entering service the Mosquito was the fastest aircraft in the world. The Mosquito with it's two man crew could carry the same bomb load to Berlin as the B17 with it's 10 man crew. Although the B17G did up that to 4500 Lbs. Unfortunately we no longer have an airworthy DH98 in the UK, the only flying example being operated in the USA, so no in flight shots of this milestone aircraft.

IMAGE: https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7358/9098281059_95a5588008_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/eRZ4​YP  (external link) de Havilland DH 98 Mosquito B35 (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

This is the B35 bomber variant, with the glass nose for the bomb aimer. In the famous film 633 Squadron they used the Fighter Bomber variant, that had a slightly smaller bomb bay, but had three 20mm Canon and 3 .303 machine guns fitted in the solid nose. Surprisingly for a type of this era, the original prototype that first flew in November 1940 is still preserved in the De Havilland Museum (external link), which is actually Britain's oldest Aviation Museum. They also have an active Facebook page which anyone interested in the DH marque can join.

Although Gloster's were the first to produce a jet powered operational fighter for the Allies, de Havilland did produce the second jet type to enter service with the RAF, in the form of the smaller single engined, but very distinctive twin boom design DH100 Vampire. A design layout harking back to Geoffrey de Havilland's DH1 two seat Scout and DH2 which was the RFC's first effectively armed single seater Scout (fighter in the modern parlance). This is the DH100 Vampire F3 in the RAF Museum Hendon.

IMAGE: https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7362/9419965980_788c8336d9_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/fmpM​Gy  (external link) de Havilland DH 100 Vampire F3 (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

In fact the twing boom design became somewhat of a distinguishing feature of the DH military jets. As wel as the original DH100 Vampire and it's Naval compatriot the Sea Vampire, there was the DH 113 and DH 115 Twin Seat versions, the DH 112 Venom/Sea Venom, and finally the much larger twin engined, two man crewed DH 110 Sea Vixen.

There were two twin seat versions of the Vampire the DH 113 Nightfighter variant and the DH 115 trainer version.

DH 115 Vampire T11, next to it's RR Goblin engine at IWM Duxford.

IMAGE: https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5509/9281663284_f99b15f31d_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/f9bX​8j  (external link) De Havilland DH 115 Vampire T11 (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

de Havilland DH 112 Sea Venom FAW 21 IWM Duxford.

IMAGE: https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8527/8645174748_e2912a749b_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/eaWM​g3  (external link) de Havilland DH 112 Sea Venom FAW 21 (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

Finally in the group of types the Sea Vixen. It was a the original Sea Vixen prototype, that just after doing a low level supersonic demonstration, tragically shed it's outer wing panels, with the resulting 12G reaction causing the aircraft to break up in flight, ejecting both RR Avon engines, one of which hit a crowd of spectators that the 1952 SBAC Farnborough Air Show. The crash resulted in the deaths of 29 spectators on the ground and the two crew. After the significant tightening of the safety rules these were the last casualties on the ground at a UK air show until the unfortunate incident at last years Shoreham Air Show.

IMAGE: https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8521/8643872800_c8ca0f6006_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/eaQ7​eE  (external link) DeHavilland DH110 Sea Vixen FAW 2 (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

Although de Havilland were building a lot of military jets they did not forget the civil aviation market post war. Aside from the DH106 Comet, which would become the first jet airliner to enter service anywhere in the world, they also continued with lighter shot haul aircraft. The type that superseded the Dh 89 would be the DH 104 Dove

IMAGE: https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1503/26579698985_82bce5d179_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/GuKU​ua  (external link) de Havilland DH 104 Dove 6 (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

As well as the Original factory in the UK de Havilland also had overseas subsidiaries in several British Commonwealth countries, Australia and New Zealand both had DH subsidiaries, and the Australian one did also design it's own types. But by far the most well known of them all was de Havilland Canada, better known as DHC. The first two of their designs being pretty iconic types. Not only was the first of the DHC types a huge success for de Havilland Canada, but it was built in, for the post war years, large numbers by the original company too. That aircraft became the successor to the DH 82a Tiger Moth as a basic trainer in the RAF, and equipped the University Air Squadrons as well as the Air Cadets Air Experience Flights, only being replaced by the Scottish Aviation Bulldog in the 1990's. Not bad for a 1946 design. That aircraft is the DHC 1 Chipmunk. I have very fond memories of flying in the Chipmunks of No5 AEF then based at Marshalls Airport Cambridge. So I have decided to pick a picture that features a Chipmunk in the markings that were in use by the AEF's and other RAF Flying Training units of the late 1970's and early 80's

IMAGE: https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2813/8819627858_52c2cd59a5_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/ermU​6h  (external link) de Havilland (Canada) DHC 1 Chipmunk 22 (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

Alan

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Apr 22, 2016 13:20 |  #12

Perfectly Frank wrote in post #17980811 (external link)
Very good, Alan.
I'm gonna have to put a UK air show on my bucket list.

Thanks for the kind comment. As far as UK airshows go we do have a few that are rather good. If you like the modern stuff, then there is RIAT, which is one of the biggest and is currently at Fairford in Gloucestershire. The last time I went it was at Greenham Common, but that was before the Ground Launched Cruise Missiles went there in the 80's. I did also attend the very first RIAT at the former RAF North Weald, a 12 Group (Midlands and East Anglia) Fighter Station during the Battle of Britain.

If you prefer you aircraft a little more historical, and you like a good museum to look round too, then try one of the IWM Duxford Shows at the former RAF Duxford in Cambridgeshire. This was also in 12 Group, and during the Battle of Britain the RAF's US Eagle Squadron was based there. It also went on to become a fighter base for the USAAF 8th Air Force. Operating Mustangs and Thunderbolts. They have three air shows a year, May, July and September. The big show is the July one.

If you like your aircraft to be predominantly pre WWII then the Shuttleworth Collection is really the place to go. They have an amazing collection of aircraft, including the oldest airworthy aircraft in the world, the oldest surviving British Aircraft, Oh and that one is not only airworthy it flys really well. They have a good collection of original and reproduction WWI aircraft, as well as a range of military and civilian types from the 20's and 30's. They pretty much stop at the start of WWII, but the do have some later types. They house the only surviving Battle of Britain Hurricane, as well as the only surviving Sea Hurricane a MK1b, there are no MK1a's as they were the ones used on the CAM ships, launched by catapult and then ditched in the sea. Their Spitfire is still undergoing a major restoration, as they had to completely rebuild it due to issues with rivets, that required every single one to be replaced. They also have from the post war era a Chipmunk and a Percival Provost. The collection hold a flying display on the first Sunday of the month from May to October.

If you want to get the most out of a trip, that is arranged around seeing a good british airshow then I would suggest the following idea. The IWM Duxford Spring airshow is on the Saturday and Sunday of the Spring Bank Holiday weekend. The bank holiday is the last Monday in May. So unless the last day of May is the Sunday, the first Sunday of June is the Following weekend. This could give the visitor the chance to see not only the Duxford show, but also the Shuttleworth show the following weekend. The two locations are only about 20 miles apart. You could stay in and around Cambridge which is a very old University city (somewhat older than your one in Mass) Also these days the road links from this area are really good, and you can get around most of the center of England, as well as visiting London. Late spring and early summer are a really good time to visit England too.

Oh and as I had to miss it out in the last post, here is the DHC 2 Beaver at IWM Duxford last May.

IMAGE: https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1446/25623199180_8595a171a3_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: https://flic.kr/p/F3eA​qd  (external link) de Havilland (Canada) DHC-2 Beaver (external link) by Alan Evans (external link), on Flickr

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Apr 23, 2016 18:24 |  #13

^^ Thanks, Alan.
Copied for future reference.


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Apr 24, 2016 05:04 |  #14

another excellent series!

BigAl007 wrote in post #17980986 (external link)
Unfortunately we no longer have an airworthy DH98 in the UK, the only flying example being operated in the USA, so no in flight shots of this milestone aircraft.

must say taking my dad out to Ardmore in 2012 to see KA114 flying was awesome...


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