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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Astronomy & Celestial 
Thread started 09 May 2016 (Monday) 13:08
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Mercury Transit

 
M_Six
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May 10, 2016 09:05 |  #16

MalVeauX wrote in post #18001690 (external link)
Load into photoshop or anything like that, enlarge your view (not the image) to whatever magnification it takes to easily see Mercury from edge to edge, crop it down to just Mercury and look at the pixel dimensions (resolution, H x W), since it's a diameter, just knowing one side is sufficient for a close guess. I'm just curious how many pixels it likely takes up as a reference (though it would be different on a different sensor with higher/lower pixel density of course).

Very best,

Looks to be 5-6 pixels on a side. It's not a distinct point at high magnification, so I grabbed the darkest areas.


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Celestron
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May 10, 2016 09:48 |  #17

Just make sure your filter is on when looking through that view finder.




  
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M_Six
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May 10, 2016 11:32 |  #18

Celestron wrote in post #18002238 (external link)
Just make sure your filter is on when looking through that view finder.

Oh, don't worry about that. I have no urge to damage my eyesight. :-)


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tuffty
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May 10, 2016 11:39 |  #19

The weather in my part of the UK was particularly bad yesterday but there was a window of opportunity around 12.30pm (British Summer Time) where the sun 'peaked' through thin cloud cover so I had a crack at it...


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It was quite tricky to focus as the cloud kept sweeping over the sun... I used EOS Utility on my Mac and a home made filter using a sheet of Thousand Oaks polymer film.... 100-400L MkII + 2x MkIII on a 6D

Was really hoping to get a series of shots throughout the afternoon but the cloud was just like a grey blanket :(

So put this together in PS... was happy to at least have captured what I could though...


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MalVeauX
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May 10, 2016 12:00 |  #20

Thanks!

6 pixels eh? Tiny!

Very best,


My Flickr (external link) :: My Astrobin (external link)

  
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chrismid259
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May 10, 2016 16:29 |  #21

Hi all,

Many thanks for all your replies. I do know the dangers of viewing the sun through the viewfinder and did use live view on 7D. I definitely value my own sight. Damaging a sensor would be bad news, but not as bad as damaging an eye. I did at one point switch from my 7D to 6D and used the WiFi Live View using the Canon app.

Like I said in my original post, I am no expert at astrophotography at all. I usually shoot people, events on a photojournalism level. I have taken images of the moon, included the recent lunar eclipse with success but never anything of the sun.

It is interesting to see other users points of view and images in regards to focal length. I have also today viewed images on Flickr that were taken with 300mm + 2x extenders and still had to crop significantly.

The next Mercury Transit visible here is in 2019. I will give it a go again, but maybe with better equipment next time, especially better protective equipment for my equipment.

:-)


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samsen
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May 10, 2016 19:10 |  #22

Very nice images Tuffty and Congratulations.


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Samsen
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tuffty
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May 11, 2016 03:39 |  #23

samsen wrote in post #18002904 (external link)
Very nice images Tuffty and Congratulations.

Thanks dude... :D

chrismid259 wrote in post #18002732 (external link)
Hi all,

Many thanks for all your replies. I do know the dangers of viewing the sun through the viewfinder and did use live view on 7D. I definitely value my own sight. Damaging a sensor would be bad news, but not as bad as damaging an eye. I did at one point switch from my 7D to 6D and used the WiFi Live View using the Canon app.

Like I said in my original post, I am no expert at astrophotography at all. I usually shoot people, events on a photojournalism level. I have taken images of the moon, included the recent lunar eclipse with success but never anything of the sun.

It is interesting to see other users points of view and images in regards to focal length. I have also today viewed images on Flickr that were taken with 300mm + 2x extenders and still had to crop significantly.

The next Mercury Transit visible here is in 2019. I will give it a go again, but maybe with better equipment next time, especially better protective equipment for my equipment.

:-)

I made a sun filter quite cheaply (£13 or roughly $18) which works rather well... more info in my blog here..
http://www.tuffty.co.u​k …02/photographin​g-the-sun/ (external link)

I used a 100-400L and a 2x extender on my 6D... I was going to use my 50D which despite being 15mp vs 20mp would have given me more res for the same crop but it needs a sensor clean, my test shots were a bit blotchy... :(

Surprising how much the 1.6x crop gives you in terms of reach over a full frame but I love the images the 6D gives so its always a compromise...

<tuffty/>




  
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heldGaze
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May 15, 2016 21:57 |  #24

So I shot the transit using my Meade LCXD55 SN-6" and Sony A7RII which is a full frame sensor. The telescope has a focal length of 762mm but I used a 2x Barlow, so my effective focal length was 1524mm, right? I just cropped this image of Mercury at 34 pixels. Just thought I'd throw that in for reference. It was hard to decide where Mercury's edge began, so I'd say its between 30-34 pixels wide.

In terms of finding and focusing. I would use my finder scope, with the lens caps on, and put my eye behind it. Even though your vision is blocked you can sort of get the scope close. Then either I'd use my 26mm eyepiece, or have my camera on and the live view active, and start making little circles until the sun came into view. I'd zoom in my live view for focusing. It's still quite difficult to nail focus, as when you're turning the focus knob, which moves the whole camera body in and out towards/away from the telescope, it causes vibrations and the image shakes and gets fuzzy.

Naturally I did all this with a solar filter on my telescope. I use the RG Film from Thousand Oaks.

Here's my first official image: https://photography-on-the.net …showthread.php?​p=18008303


IMAGE: http://chuck-d.net/images/potn/Astronomy/Mercury34Pixels.jpg

Cameras: Sony α7R II, Canon 40D, Samsung Galaxy S7
Lenses: Canon 11-24mm f/4 L, 24-70mm f/2.8 L II, 50mm f/1.8 II, Sigma 18-200mm
Telescope: Meade LXD55 SN-6" F=762mm f/5, with a 2x Barlow T-Mount
Retired Cameras: Canon SD300, Nokia N95, Galaxy S, S3 & S4
C&C Always Appreciated

  
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Mercury Transit
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