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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing 
Thread started 24 May 2016 (Tuesday) 19:04
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Newbie to RAW

 
Bogino
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May 24, 2016 19:04 |  #1

I'm totally used to using LR5. I also have Elements 10 though I hardly use it. I've never taken photo's in RAW and want to start. What program do I need to view and edit photo's in RAW. Does LR5 still have any role at that point. Thank You.


Canon 7D Mark II; Canon 70-300mm "L"; Canon 100mm Macro; Tamron 24-70mm; Tokina 11-16mm 2.8

  
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windpig
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May 24, 2016 19:11 |  #2

Your Canon camera came with DPP, it is a good place to start.
You may have to update your Elements 10
https://forums.adobe.c​om/thread/1386673 (external link)


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Bassat
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May 24, 2016 19:21 |  #3

LR 5 can handle all your raw processing needs from a 60D. There is no need to go to DPP. DPP is a raw converter. LR5 is the entire photo processing and file management program.




  
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Bogino
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May 24, 2016 19:31 as a reply to  @ Bassat's post |  #4

I've donated my 60D to my daughter and now use a 7D Mark 2. Assume that will work too?


Canon 7D Mark II; Canon 70-300mm "L"; Canon 100mm Macro; Tamron 24-70mm; Tokina 11-16mm 2.8

  
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Bassat
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Post edited over 2 years ago by Bassat.
     
May 24, 2016 21:11 as a reply to  @ Bogino's post |  #5

Yes. You may have to run an update, but it will work just fine.




  
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Big ­ Jake
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May 24, 2016 22:51 |  #6

I run LR 5 and shoot only RAW with a 7D mii. Your are all set with your current software. Have fun!




  
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tzalman
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May 25, 2016 02:47 |  #7

LR is primarily a Raw processor. If you have only been using it to edit jpgs, you have been using only 20% of its power.


Elie / אלי

  
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Bassat
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May 25, 2016 03:37 |  #8

tzalman wrote in post #18018315 (external link)
LR is primarily a Raw processor. If you have only been using it to edit jpgs, you have been using only 20% of its power.

Disagree. Completely. LR is a really good raw processor. It is also an excellent photo management system. It is also an excellent JPG processor. It is a complete photo processing package. Just because it is an extraordinary raw processor does not mean it is only a raw processor. If you are only processing raw photos with it, you are using far LESS than 20% of its power.




  
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john ­ crossley
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May 25, 2016 04:14 |  #9

tzalman wrote in post #18018315 (external link)
LR is primarily a Raw processor. If you have only been using it to edit jpgs, you have been using only 20% of its power.


I thought Lightroom was classed as DAM software (whatever that is). But whatever it is it's a damn good piece of software.


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Luckless
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May 25, 2016 10:28 |  #10

Lightroom is a great piece of software that bundles 3 key tools together that make dealing with photos really fast and easy.

The first two tools seamlessly blend together, and a lot of people don't really notice that two rather different things are going on:
1. Raw image file processing
2. Basic image editing/adjustment.

The raw file processing is blended together with the general image editing, which makes working with raw files like .cr2 files produced by canon dSLRs feel no different than working with a .png, .jpg, or .tiff. The file conversion happens in the background as you edit, but the big thing is that Lightroom doesn't mess with the original file. (However, you can't do as large of edits as you can with a full raster editor like Photoshop.)

Of course there is yet another tool that is a little less seamless compared to the first two, and often the most confusing to new users who haven't considered it as 'a thing'.
3. DAM - Digital Asset Management.

This is a huge thing that can take a very long time to really get your head around and find out how useful it is. But once you do, you'll have wished you made better use of it from the get go. At the heart of the system is the Catalogue and image "Metadata". The keywording is a very big deal that makes things so much easier to manage as you move on and collect more and more images. Taking time to apply suitable 'rough' keywords on import, and then refining those after you have sorted and done your culling, will save so much time and effort down the road when you go to dig up photos.

Someone asks if you have a photo of a duck landing on water? Well if you had only processed things through a raw converter, then edited in Photoshop, and dropped the finished photo into a dated folder (Or worse, a general "Finished" folder), then you could have a very hard time to find anything five years down the road when you have thousands, or tens of thousands, of 'good' photos that you were happy enough to keep. With a good set of keywords? Well then you can quickly search and filter your content.

(Facial Recognition is a really cool tool bundled with things that can be useful if you're doing lots of photos of people. Really saves time when it comes to keywording photos from events and such where all the images of a given person aren't in a row, or people are mixed in at random. However I believe that was only added in LR6, not 5. Also not all that useful of a tool if you're not dealing with human faces. I really need to sit down and run this more often on my sports photos.)


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BigAl007
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May 25, 2016 18:47 |  #11

Luckless wrote in post #18018645 (external link)
Lightroom is a great piece of software that bundles 3 key tools together that make dealing with photos really fast and easy.

The first two tools seamlessly blend together, and a lot of people don't really notice that two rather different things are going on:
1. Raw image file processing
2. Basic image editing/adjustment.

The raw file processing is blended together with the general image editing, which makes working with raw files like .cr2 files produced by canon dSLRs feel no different than working with a .png, .jpg, or .tiff. The file conversion happens in the background as you edit, but the big thing is that Lightroom doesn't mess with the original file. (However, you can't do as large of edits as you can with a full raster editor like Photoshop.)

Of course there is yet another tool that is a little less seamless compared to the first two, and often the most confusing to new users who haven't considered it as 'a thing'.
3. DAM - Digital Asset Management.

This is a huge thing that can take a very long time to really get your head around and find out how useful it is. But once you do, you'll have wished you made better use of it from the get go. At the heart of the system is the Catalogue and image "Metadata". The keywording is a very big deal that makes things so much easier to manage as you move on and collect more and more images. Taking time to apply suitable 'rough' keywords on import, and then refining those after you have sorted and done your culling, will save so much time and effort down the road when you go to dig up photos.

Someone asks if you have a photo of a duck landing on water? Well if you had only processed things through a raw converter, then edited in Photoshop, and dropped the finished photo into a dated folder (Or worse, a general "Finished" folder), then you could have a very hard time to find anything five years down the road when you have thousands, or tens of thousands, of 'good' photos that you were happy enough to keep. With a good set of keywords? Well then you can quickly search and filter your content.

(Facial Recognition is a really cool tool bundled with things that can be useful if you're doing lots of photos of people. Really saves time when it comes to keywording photos from events and such where all the images of a given person aren't in a row, or people are mixed in at random. However I believe that was only added in LR6, not 5. Also not all that useful of a tool if you're not dealing with human faces. I really need to sit down and run this more often on my sports photos.)

You forgot the "OTHER" great thing that LR is really good at, creating your final output! I don't just mean exporting a JPEG file either, although it is very good at that too. Actually exporting a JPEG file is so easy, and by making presets for your usual needs it is usually easier to simply produce an output file for a tailored use, use the file and simply delete it until you need a file for something else. There is also the print module, which once you understand they way it can be used to lay out images on the page is a vastly better way of printing your images than using the clunky old printing system in Photoshop. Again it is really easy to save presets so that next time it is simply a matter of selecting your images and the required preset. In addition to the printing module there are also modules for generating web galleries, slideshows and even a photo book module. Again in all of them it is very easy to create your own presets so that you can quickly produce your own output style.

It is this complete system from importing the RAW file, to finished output, along with the strong tools for sorting images by multiple categories, that I am such a keen user of LR.

Alan


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tonylong
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May 25, 2016 19:37 |  #12

Bogino wrote in post #18017916 (external link)
I'm totally used to using LR5. I also have Elements 10 though I hardly use it. I've never taken photo's in RAW and want to start. What program do I need to view and edit photo's in RAW. Does LR5 still have any role at that point. Thank You.

Well, rather than repeat myself:

https://photography-on-the.net …showthread.php?​p=18019164


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Luckless
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May 26, 2016 06:52 |  #13

BigAl007 wrote in post #18019150 (external link)
You forgot the "OTHER" great thing that LR is really good at, creating your final output! I don't just mean exporting a JPEG file either, although it is very good at that too. Actually exporting a JPEG file is so easy, and by making presets for your usual needs it is usually easier to simply produce an output file for a tailored use, use the file and simply delete it until you need a file for something else. There is also the print module, which once you understand they way it can be used to lay out images on the page is a vastly better way of printing your images than using the clunky old printing system in Photoshop. Again it is really easy to save presets so that next time it is simply a matter of selecting your images and the required preset. In addition to the printing module there are also modules for generating web galleries, slideshows and even a photo book module. Again in all of them it is very easy to create your own presets so that you can quickly produce your own output style.

It is this complete system from importing the RAW file, to finished output, along with the strong tools for sorting images by multiple categories, that I am such a keen user of LR.

Alan

I was kind of lumping all that "Export" option stuff into the conversion/editor functionality, given that an editing tool that doesn't let you actually do anything with the changes you've made isn't all that useful of a tool.

But that's a really good point. Lightroom's export workflow is so smooth and seamless that I never really think about it anymore. I only use Photoshop for a few images, stuff that needs more tools and work than what I can readily do in Lightroom alone (which is basically anything that I want layers for), but I no longer actually save/export finished images from photoshop anymore. Only time I really muck about with the file handling in photoshop these days is handling tech stuff for software development. (Icons, backgrounds, mockups, etc.) Photo workflow? Import into Lightroom: Do initial adjustments: "Open In" photoshop: Edit: Save and return to Lightroom: Final adjustments and evaluation: Export.

Eventually I need to sit down and figure out how to point Lightroom Facebook uploads to a Facebook Page. (Last time I tried I could only get it to create folders/galleries on my personal profile page, not my more public "Page".)


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tzalman
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May 26, 2016 11:14 |  #14

tzalman wrote in post #18018315 (external link)
LR is primarily a Raw processor. If you have only been using it to edit jpgs, you have been using only 20% of its power.

Sorry, my bad. The first sentence should start "LR's Develop module is..."
Without reference to all the other things that LR does in other modules, if you process from Raw it is far more powerful than when it is trying to patch up a photo already rendered to RGB, especially if it is a camera-rendered and compressed jpg.


Elie / אלי

  
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