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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Wildlife Talk 
Thread started 03 Jun 2016 (Friday) 03:01
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Distant Animal Shots

 
Fredan
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Joined Apr 2013
Location: England
     
Jun 03, 2016 03:01 |  #1

Hi everyone i was looking to get some information from you all if at all possible.
I'm looking at doing some nature shots etc with my Canon 7D Mark II
I need a decent lens for distant animals and since i had a Canon EF 70-300mm f4/5.6 IS USM i thought id try it out.
Downside i found was taking shots of anything distant seemed poor when zoomed in so i was after ideas if at all possible on what Lens to buy
As i have just spent £3000 on Camera gear i can afford maybe another £800 for now
Any suggestions on what Lens please? Be nice if Lens suggestions could be supported with some of your shots using that Lens
Thank you so much in advance for any help
Terry


Body: Canon 7D Mark II, Canon 430 EX III - RT Speedflash, Canon EF 24-70mm f4 L IS USM Lens, 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM Lens, Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM Lens, Canon MPE-65 Macro Lens, Manfrotto 290 MT294A3 Tripod, Manfrotto 498 Ball Head
Flickr account HERE (external link)

  
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werds
"Yes, Sire. You'll shut your trap!"
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Jun 03, 2016 09:28 |  #2

For under 800 british pounds http://pricespy.co.uk/​product.php?p=2418363 (external link)

Tamron 150-600 contemporary and for pictures check out the Flickr group https://www.flickr.com​/groups/2470447@N21/ (external link)

:)

The Sigma Contemporary 150-600 should be in similar range of cost as well I believe.


Gear: Nikon D750, Nikon D7200, Sigma 17-50 2.8 OS, Sigma 50-150 2.8 OS HSM EX , Nikon 70-200 2.8 VR1, Tamron 24-70 2.8 VC, Tamron 70-200 2.8 VC, Tamron 28-300mm Di VC PZD, Tamron 16-300mm VC PZD, Tamron 150-600 VC, Nikon AF-S 50mm 1.8, Nikon SB-900
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Tom ­ Reichner
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Location: Omak, in north-central Washington state, USA
Post edited over 3 years ago by Tom Reichner. (2 edits in all)
     
Jun 23, 2016 13:18 |  #3

.

Hi, Terry!

The lenses that werds suggested seem like sound suggestions to me, considering your 800 pound budget.

Just keep in mind that even at 600mm, or 800mm, you still have to get pretty close the animals in order to get "frame filling" photos. A lot of people think that long telephoto lenses are far more powerful than they really are. No camera lens, not even a 1200mm, will enable you to shoot frame-filling images of distant wildlife.

Once I had a guy stop and ask me a question at a National Wildlife Refuge. I was shooting some deer that were about 250 yards away with my 800mm lens. He saw the big lens, and he saw the deer out there in the prairie, and he asked me, "So, what are you taking pictures of, deer eyeballs?"

I said, "excuse me, what do you mean?"

He replied, "With that huge lens you must be getting closeups of their eyeballs, right?"

I responded, "No, not at all. In fact, these pictures don't bring the deer very close at all."

He thought I was joking, or being deceitful; he just couldn't believe what I was saying. So I invited him to look thru the lens. He came over and looked thru the viewfinder, and was shocked. "I can't believe it! I thought with that big lens you'd be getting closeups of their eyeballs."

In reality, what he saw thru the viewfinder of that 800mm lens was 4 or 5 deer that fit into the frame easily, with room to spare on either side of the herd.

I have had many people say similar things to me throughout the years. It just shows me that many people who are not familiar with wildlife photography or long telephoto lenses have a complete misconception of what long lenses are capable of. To take nice wildlife portraits, you really need to be close to the animals, no matter how long your lens is. If an animal is truly "distant", which is the term you used, then you will not be able to get portrait style photos no matter what lens you are using.

.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
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john ­ crossley
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Joined Nov 2009
     
Jun 23, 2016 13:57 |  #4

Fredan wrote in post #18027568 (external link)
Hi everyone i was looking to get some information from you all if at all possible.
I'm looking at doing some nature shots etc with my Canon 7D Mark II
I need a decent lens for distant animals and since i had a Canon EF 70-300mm f4/5.6 IS USM i thought id try it out.
Downside i found was taking shots of anything distant seemed poor when zoomed in so i was after ideas if at all possible on what Lens to buy
As i have just spent £3000 on Camera gear i can afford maybe another £800 for now
Any suggestions on what Lens please? Be nice if Lens suggestions could be supported with some of your shots using that Lens
Thank you so much in advance for any help
Terry


Two questions:

1) What animals are you photographing
2) How close are you to them


Football is a very simple game. Twenty-two players chase a ball and Germany always win.

  
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Copidosoma
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Location: Edmonton AB, Canada
     
Jun 24, 2016 12:13 |  #5

Tom Reichner wrote in post #18048023 (external link)
.

Hi, Terry!

The lenses that werds suggested seem like sound suggestions to me, considering your 800 pound budget.

Just keep in mind that even at 600mm, or 800mm, you still have to get pretty close the animals in order to get "frame filling" photos. A lot of people think that long telephoto lenses are far more powerful than they really are. No camera lens, not even a 1200mm, will enable you to shoot frame-filling images of distant wildlife.

Once I had a guy stop and ask me a question at a National Wildlife Refuge. I was shooting some deer that were about 250 yards away with my 800mm lens. He saw the big lens, and he saw the deer out there in the prairie, and he asked me, "So, what are you taking pictures of, deer eyeballs?"

I said, "excuse me, what do you mean?"

He replied, "With that huge lens you must be getting closeups of their eyeballs, right?"

I responded, "No, not at all. In fact, these pictures don't bring the deer very close at all."

He thought I was joking, or being deceitful; he just couldn't believe what I was saying. So I invited him to look thru the lens. He came over and looked thru the viewfinder, and was shocked. "I can't believe it! I thought with that big lens you'd be getting closeups of their eyeballs."

In reality, what he saw thru the viewfinder of that 800mm lens was 4 or 5 deer that fit into the frame easily, with room to spare on either side of the herd.

I have had many people say similar things to me throughout the years. It just shows me that many people who are not familiar with wildlife photography or long telephoto lenses have a complete misconception of what long lenses are capable of. To take nice wildlife portraits, you really need to be close to the animals, no matter how long your lens is. If an animal is truly "distant", which is the term you used, then you will not be able to get portrait style photos no matter what lens you are using.

.

Just to add to the point above, it is surprising how much image degradation can happen at long distances due to atmospheric conditions. Heat and dust/haze can degrade an image much more than a lowish quality lens can, even at what would be considered 'normal' wildlife ranges 100-200m.

Honestly, nothing beats getting closer.


Gear: 7DII | 6D | Fuji X100s |Sigma 24A, 50A, 150-600C |24-105L |Samyang 14 2.8|Tamron 90mm f2.8 |and some other stuff
http://www.shutterstoc​k.com/g/copidosoma (external link)
https://500px.com/chri​s_kolaczan (external link)

  
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Snydremark
my very own Lightrules moment
18,443 posts
Gallery: 45 photos
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Location: Issaquah, WA USA
     
Jun 24, 2016 12:54 |  #6

Your money should be on the Sigma 150-600 C for that price range, I'd say. And then heeding the info provided by Tom and others; if you're too far out to get a decent amount of, at least, one AF point covering your subject (and hopefully more), then you're too far out for quality pictures regardless of the lens you're using.


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
"The easiest way to improve your photos is to adjust the loose nut between the shutter release and the ground."

  
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Distant Animal Shots
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